navitron
 
Renewable Energy and Sustainability Forum
UK's most popular Renewable Energy Forum December 20, 2014, 05:56:14 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Anyone wishing to register as a new member on the forum is strongly recommended to use a "proper" email address - following recent spam/hack attempts on the forum, all security is set to "high", and "disposable" email addresses like Gmail, Yahoo and Hotmail tend to be viewed with suspicion, and the application rejected if there is any doubt whatsoever
 
Recent Articles: Navitron Partners With Solax to Help Create A More Sustainable Future | Navitron Calls for Increased Carbon Footprint Reduction In Light of Earth Overshoot Day | A plea from The David School - Issue 18
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: wood burning stove with hot plate ..any good for cooking ?  (Read 13494 times)
citrus
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 15


« on: December 18, 2011, 08:55:59 AM »

so thinking about getting a wood/multi-fuel burning stove for the front room but would like a hot plate on it  .....my question is  ...how hot does that plate get  ...can you boil water or actually make any food on it  ?

or are they simply for warming middle class fondue ?

Cheers

Chris
Logged
ecogeorge
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1154


« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2011, 09:35:11 AM »

Got an Aarrow Stratford T50b with hotplate. Does not get hot enough to cook when using wood and air inlet thermostat set to 4/5 . Ok for keeping things hot and perhaps a very prolonged simmer.
I guess I could run the fire hotter but my setting produces enough heat for room and ufh.
Anyone else cook on an Aarrow?
rgds George.

Logged
garethpuk
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 141


« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2011, 09:40:09 AM »

Hi Chris,

It will get hot but I'm not sure if you could cook on it, I've tried a kettle on 3 different stoves and found that a small 1 cup camping kettle boiled quickly but a normal cooker size takes ages (upto an hour.) I'm guessing here but I wonder if a stove for heating has a firebox designed to chuck the heat into the room and a stove for cooking concentrates all the heat on the hot plates?
 
Gareth.
Logged
ecogeorge
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1154


« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2011, 09:58:16 AM »

Just taken photo of our Aarrow . Heating (ufh) is on and demanding heat (hard frost here) . Stove water output is 54c. Stove has loading valve set to approx 50c on the boiler.
Return to stove is I guess only 28-30c as buffer tank depleted from last nights burn.
Air inlet thermostat set at 3 so probably shut off ! air entering via vents above glass (air wash) to sustain burn.
Not hot enough to cook on. but if you look closely at the top of the stove you will see some molten aluminium removed from the ash pan this morning so my burn is hot enough!.
Burning waste door/window frames from my double glazing neighbour (he has oil and pays to have wood removed -how crazy) who is glad to get shot of them.
rgds George.


* DSCF0666.jpg (102.51 KB, 722x541 - viewed 6366 times.)
Logged
Heinz
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 766



« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2011, 10:13:31 AM »

The main reason why my current stove is flat topped is so I could cook in an emergency, Burns day storm in 1990 was a wake up call, not had the need since though.
I've done sausages in a deep baking tray with foil over the top, took a while, but it was free. Did a stew a while ago, bit like doing it in a slow cooker. Never tried boiling a kettle as the room with the stove is where the kids are and I didn't like the idea of boiling water and children. Suppose they are bigger now and I might give it a go later. Got a cast iron trivet on the stove which reduces the heat a bit, ideal for defrosting/heating mince pies   Cool

H
Logged


"Do, or do not. There is no 'try' "  Yoda
titan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 403


« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2011, 10:18:37 AM »

so thinking about getting a wood/multi-fuel burning stove for the front room but would like a hot plate on it  .....my question is  ...how hot does that plate get  ...can you boil water or actually make any food on it  ?


We have a standard Dowling Hybrid 6 kW multi fuel and it easily boils a big kettle ( on wood) we use it all the time for this. There is no hotplate just the top of the stove.
Logged
mikey9
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 295


Fetlar....


« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2011, 10:22:14 AM »

Yes - Yes and yes.
 We have a Clearview Pioneer (the one thing we have recommended more than anything else in our house) 5kW stove - with back boiler.

It is run for 6 months of the year and is the only heat source for our kitchen (our main lving space) - it typically is filled with logs and shut down overnight - then back up in minutes the following morning.

We cook soup, curries, casseroles in Le Cruset iron pots on the top of the stove - and have two levels of trivet to move the pots onto if they are boiling too vigourously.

We also have an AGA 3 litre kettle - this sits on top most of the time - and we fill the leccy kettle from it (making a boil about 30 secs) - and use the hot for all manner of other tasks you would either  boil the kettle for - or run the hot water for.

I suppose we also get space heating from our dinner.......the pots being like a big radiator Grin

We also have an  electric oven, grill and hob - and use them all.....but so much less.
Logged

5kw WBS with 1kW Back Boiler - 6m sq Genersys Solar Thermal, 3.05kWp Yingli PV, 10 raised beds, 2 apple, 1 plum and 1 pear tree - and two little helpers
First 2 mWh produced April 2011 ;-)
biff
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7550


An unpaid Navitron volunteer who lives off-grid.


« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2011, 10:28:57 AM »

that is a really good looking fire george,
                         the two flatscreens are a bit confusing,? but you would only have to look at that fire to feel warm.
                                                                                                    biff
Logged

An unpaid Navitron volunteer,who has been living off-grid,powered by wind and solar,each year better than the last one.
Baz
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1391


« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2011, 11:04:06 AM »

In most wbs there is a 'throat plate' above the fire to direct the hot gases forwards then they curl through a gap at the front over the back of the plate to the flue. This is to stop the hot gas and flames going straight up the chimney for better efficiency. So the top of the stove is heated by hot gas not flames/radiant heat off the glowing wood and so will be only about 150C unless you are overstoking the fire.
In a cooker, eg kitchen range, the stove top above the fire is exposed to the radiant heat so can get hotter, then the gases flow sideways over the top of the oven and underside of the rest of the hotplate which is used for simmering. If the cooker is equipped with covers they will hold the heat allowing the top, especially if heavy cast iron, to reach a high temp and have the reserve capacity to boil the kettle fast.
A few cookers eg Broseley have a couple or multiple rings on top, (also often seen in stoves in wild west movies) which are known as 'boiling rings' which is no coincidence. They are taken out according to the size of the pan/kettle to allow direct radiant heat which is especially helpful when the pan is not a ground flat base but rounded through use.
Finally a couple of designs of cooker have grates that can be raised up so that a small fire can get right up close to the top plate to concentrate that radiant heat. Radiant heat is very important and in a steam locomotive at least half the heat is captured in firebox with the tubes in the boiler just ehlping out for economy.
Logged
Eleanor
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2576



« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2011, 11:46:08 AM »

This has reminded me to get on and buy the Le Creuset tagine as I'm sure it will work really well on our WindySmithy stove  stir
Logged

I'm doing this for free, please be nice to me surrender
"Very few batteries die a natural death ... most are murdered" stir
spaces
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 778



« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2011, 01:19:23 PM »

Breakfast, whether toast and coffee or bacon, mushrooms, egg and the rest is always cooked on our ancient French stove. If it's still warming up the toast is done directly on the steel top (with the decorative lid hinged up) otherwise once hot a trivet is used - or on the decorative top if down. Tea and suppers are often done on the stove also - le Creuset stuff works as intended. At the moment am looking into making a small oven to go on the stove top, but so much gas is saved we don't bergrudge using propane at times. The lower picture is like our stove - brought back from Brittany by some friends from a holiday property which some English were 'renovating' - the stove was to be chucked because of a small crack in the top plate.  facepalm

       
Logged

Simplicity, the ultimate refinement
mikey9
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 295


Fetlar....


« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2011, 03:22:31 PM »

Am trying to cook our very low food miles mince and tatties (not just your normal mince and tatties though....) this afternoon on the stove.

Am taking pics and mental notes as we go - so will update later.
The sound of bubbling veg/mince as I type is quite pleasant though.

..... - off to turn the stove down a smidge   Grin
Logged

5kw WBS with 1kW Back Boiler - 6m sq Genersys Solar Thermal, 3.05kWp Yingli PV, 10 raised beds, 2 apple, 1 plum and 1 pear tree - and two little helpers
First 2 mWh produced April 2011 ;-)
mikey9
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 295


Fetlar....


« Reply #12 on: December 18, 2011, 09:13:44 PM »

Onions on to soften


Nice low simmering heat


Add beef mince (Stewey 4 - local Shetland bullock from Organic Farm down the road)
Turn up heat a bit to get it browning nicely


Add Diced Parsnip, Carrot from garden - and Celery from god knows where at this time of year (not perfect  Roll Eyes)
Also some random dried mixed herbs, a bit of veg boullion and two tins of tomatoes - and splash of water (from kettle behind)


SImmer gently for - lets say - as long as you have got (for us today - it was 3.5 hours ish)
from:


to nearly ready:


Boil Potatoes and steam Sprouts (both from the "Spud Hut" at Garguston farm - 2 miles down the road from here - some of the best Roosters on the Black Isle - and the Black Isle produces many very fine spuds). We did these in 20 mins on the hob (I did say we are NOT perfect!)

And Serve


And even the three year old had a go at his Sprouts (proud Dad...) - the slow cooking approach really does let the

And a couple of portions left over for tomorrow night for the In Laws.

So - the stove was on anyway (tis freezing and snowing here - and a cosy 18.5 C all day in the Kitchen) and we were around enough to keep an eye on the pot to make sure it didn't burn. The stove was ticking over most of the time - not flaming - and closed mostly down - with good hot wood inside.
For browning the meat - I let a bit of air in to get the temp up quickly - but after 5 mins - back down to simmer.

The stove doesn't have a specific "hotplate" this all just used the 7-8mm thick stove top which obviously does get hot enough to cook on - to dispute the earlier statements in this thread. We can also BOIL the 3 litre kettle from cold water - I haven't timed it as we always pour whatever we have in it into the electric kettle to finish the boil.
For those who worry about hot water an the kids - I would be worried about the Stove! Get an excellent Morso Fire Guard (see pics).

We burn mainly Birch at the moment - very local and lots available (including in our back garden) - although not supposed to be the best burning - seasoned for at least  year by us - it goes pretty well. We do have a very long chimney - which appears to give an excellent draw - even on the calmest of days.

Hope this is useful to someone  Grin
« Last Edit: December 18, 2011, 09:25:20 PM by mikey9 » Logged

5kw WBS with 1kW Back Boiler - 6m sq Genersys Solar Thermal, 3.05kWp Yingli PV, 10 raised beds, 2 apple, 1 plum and 1 pear tree - and two little helpers
First 2 mWh produced April 2011 ;-)
DominicJ
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 146


« Reply #13 on: December 19, 2011, 10:37:53 AM »

http://www.firesrus.co.uk/catalog/sabina-wood-burning-steel-stovewith-oven-p-3173.html
http://www.esse.com/range-cookers/ironheart/

I was looking at something like that, before the other half put her foot down and we ended up with a silly gas fire.
My research led me to believe that you were best off slow cooking in a Creuset.

My (possibly wrong) maths is telling me you need about 240,000j to boil a litre of water, which is the entire heat out put of a stove for the better part of a minute.
Of course, some will go to the room, lots will go to the back boiler if you have one, and your fire is unlikely to be running at full blast.

But then, you dont need boiling water for a cuppa anyway.
Logged

-------------------
I'm not a hippie
Baz
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1391


« Reply #14 on: December 19, 2011, 01:01:23 PM »

 "you dont need boiling water for a cuppa anyway."

not coming to tea with yuo then. hope you at least warm the pot in front of the fire. ( I have a special log for putting the pot on at the right height.)
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!