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Author Topic: Can you burn painted wood ?  (Read 22848 times)
pcolbeck
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« on: March 10, 2009, 06:03:18 PM »

I am going to replace the rotten soffits nad barge boards etc on my house with plastic ones. They are painted with exterior gloss. Is it OK to burn this in a multi fuel stove or should I take it all down the tip ?
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Amy
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« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2009, 06:08:10 PM »

I would suggest you try it but make sure the fire is hot first so any smoking paint is fully burned and doesnt send paint fumes up the chimney.

If you think its lead paint then be careful and dont tell the council if you decide to take it to the tip
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mespilus
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« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2009, 06:27:45 PM »

NO, no, no, no, no.

Treated wood of any age beyond a couple of years will have been 'Tanalised'.

This process used copper chrome arsenate in solvent to penetrate into the 'raw' wood.

Any of copper, chrome or arsenic can kill you in vanishingly small quantities, let alone in combination.

The only way to responsibly dispose of 'Treated' wood is,
to a Local Authority Waste Site where it can be consigned to landfill forever.
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guydewdney
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« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2009, 08:25:37 PM »

seriously? bury it so it can seep into the rivers etc - rather than burn it? Modern wood is 'tanalised' isnt it?
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desperate
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« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2009, 08:38:49 PM »

I would have thought that most painted wood was not tanalised, however what the paint contains is anybodys guess, I have been burning demolition timber on an open fire for years with no bad effects, I think, Tongue but I do steer clear of sawn/treated.

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billi
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« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2009, 09:20:57 PM »

sure a good incineration idea would help , but home incineration is another story


billi
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« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2009, 11:38:23 PM »

If you enjoy filling the atmosphere with carcinogenic fumes and PCBs by all means go ahead. But don't let the EEC emissions inspectors know as they might lock you in the Tower and throw the key away.   (Edit:  Wink)

-Paul
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guydewdney
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« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2009, 11:48:11 PM »

I hope thats tongue in cheek paul - the inspectors (if they exist) are hardly going to pop round to 27 acacia avenue, blandville, nowhereshire to check on emisssions....
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County 4x4
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« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2009, 06:56:45 AM »

There's a thread running on another forum at the minute about whether sleepers etc should be burned.

The point I made there is that it often strikes me as a bit odd that many people on what are basically "green" forums are more concerned about whether burning a particular material will damage their appliance or flue than they are about the stuff that's going up said flue for the rest of us to breathe in at a later date.

Many materials like this have to be incinerated at very high temperatures industrially, and exhaust stacks are often scrubbed as well. A very different animal to your domestic wood stove. Burning tanalised timber can leave some very concentrated nasties in the ash or so I've read. The CCA ingredient that was used in tanalised timber has been phased out now - modern Tanalith treatments are a different formulation I believe.

Personally, I'm all for free heat and so on, but I'd be no happier burning sleepers and chipboard in my stove than I would be throwing on all our plastic milk bottles and packaging. It might all disappear, and it probably won't make a stink in your living room, but we need to have a thought for everyone else at the other end of the chimney.

Andy
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wyleu
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« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2009, 07:17:41 AM »

Will the first town to develop a good old fashioned smog from domestic wood fires be a environmental success or a disaster?

...and just to bring a little research element into this, where do people think it might be?
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« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2009, 09:09:39 AM »

I guess that will be hippyville then?

Everything comes with risk, we just have to decide which is the lesser.

When I think back over my lifes involvment in farming and the chemicals ive worked with and come into contact with, i can only imagain im a ticking timebomb lottery of what illnesses might develop.

Fulminate of mercury powder was used to treat seed corn, applied by weighing out and sprinkling over a pile of grain then turned by hand with a shovel to mix in. - No mask as you couldnt find one when you needed it.

Formaldahyde used in sheep foot baths, used to treat silage and damp corn going to store.

Numerous liquid fungicides, insecticides, herbicides used in crop spray. powders mixed in a bucket then added to the tank. Only in later years were decent safety items supplied and used.

Anti viral and bacterial cocktails mixed and sprayed in animal sheds between crops, not to mention the long term effects of organophosphates which even now some people deny are dangerous.

Many of these chemicals were used together with little or no understanding of the potential chemical reactions, the fumes and gasses given off, many of which wouldnt have been protected against by the normal standard of protective equipment available.

Even the humble particle dust masks wernt worn by many as you couldnt do hard physical work and breath through one at the same time.

When i was 7 and we moved into the farmhouse, i was playing in the old garden shed. It was full of many years of junk including cans of weed killer and creosote. I picked up a rusty can which split and splashed my arm with stinking brown goo. I found my way to the house and was cleaned up, only to hear people talking about DDT.
Who knows how much has soaked through my skin and is altering my DNA.

Of course, its all changed now. Theres more awareness and the insurance companies have made H&S a top priority.

So after all ive been through, a little woodsmoke seems rather insignificant.



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wdh
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« Reply #11 on: March 11, 2009, 10:19:46 AM »

I am going to replace the rotten soffits nad barge boards etc on my house with plastic ones. They are painted with exterior gloss. Is it OK to burn this in a multi fuel stove or should I take it all down the tip ?


Are you worried about your own health, or the risk of environmental damage?

Regarding your own health, the only likely risk would be from the ash. (No fumes escaping to the room, I hope.)
I'd send the ash to landfill rather than putting it on the veg bed as you might with 'clean' wood ash. And I would try (as always) not to stir up the dust excessively.

If its rotten, how well will it burn? And do you want to introduce all that rot into the house?

Regarding the environment, my guess is that there wouldn't be a significant difference between the different disposal options. Your quantity of contaminants must be pretty tiny. And unless the paint is more than 40 (Huh) years old, it shouldn't contain any lead. Might there still be some other 'heavy metals' in the pigments ? 
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dhaslam
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« Reply #12 on: March 11, 2009, 10:27:15 AM »

Paint was  traditionally burned off, before painting,  by professional painters.  If they survived a full lifetime doing this  burning paint cannot be all that dangerous.    Wood burning in itself is quite polluting, fine dust inside the house is quite unhealthy but outside the smoke shouldn't cause too much problems except in densely populated areas.   Parts of Holland are now very polluted by wood smoke.   
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« Reply #13 on: March 11, 2009, 11:11:12 AM »

I'm with county 4x4, why do it, if there is any risk don't do it if there is a viable alternative, landfill it.
I think county 4x4 has experience of professional waste disposal etc.
I have read that the US and Canada have big problems with pollution from wood burning which is why some are promoting masonry and gassifying stoves.
laters
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County 4x4
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« Reply #14 on: March 11, 2009, 05:44:36 PM »

I live in hope that most people will learn how to burn and use wood properly - your chimney shouldn't really have smoke puthering out of it for hours and hours. We start our stove with dry wood and plenty of draught and it's roaring away in a matter of two minutes or less - it's rare to see anything but a heat haze coming out of our chimney. Also, I'm not altogether convinced that burning overnight is a great idea because you have fuel smouldering away and chucking smoke out all night. Very handy in the morning - you can probably save at least three minutes out of your day which is about the time it takes to lay a fire.

As far as paint and stuff goes, well maybe many of the paint burners were okay, but do we know that none of them suffered any ill effects as a result? My grandad smoked a pipe until he died at 96 - that doesn't mean smoking is a good idea though does it?

It's very easy to chuck stuff on the fire and watch it disappear - one of my neighbours who's a grand old boy burns all his plastic bottles etc because he can't see that it will do any harm - but even though your house smells fine, your fire draws nicely and so on, all that cr*p produced when these things are burned at relatively low temperatures HAS to go somewhere.

Andy
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