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Author Topic: PV instalation  (Read 2351 times)
iann41
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« on: May 01, 2014, 08:22:36 AM »




hello, Iím after an installer in the Sheffield area.

before I go ahead I have a few questions as Iím new to PV solar.

the house is semi-detached and south,westish facing, but has a tiny roof. Iíll get about 5 panels on the front, 5 on the side and 5 on the back.

front and side get sun 3/4 of the day as it travels across the sky. back of house from 1pm in summer.

there is no shading apart from very early in the morning from the chimney and this would only affect the nearest panel for about an hour.

my questions are,

how much is it to install PV solar these days roughly for 15/16 panels.

would having 1 area of the roof in shade part of the day affect the rest of the panels.

is it possible to diy it and have it have an electrician connect it up. how hard is it. (I have solar thermal which I did diy myself, about 6 years ago)(this will have to be taken down)

how much is FITS and is it going to decrease any time soon.

i have more questions but my minds a blank at moment.

thx Ian
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ianh64
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« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2014, 08:48:34 AM »

Hi

I will try and answer a few questions for you.

I didn't realise this at first, but this is a forum hosted by a Solar supplier, so you will only get open responses to the installer question from those that are Navitron installers. But you may get a PM from someone recommending someone else who is not.

You say you have a tiny roof, but want 15/16 panels. That should give you the full compliment of 4kWp that ideally you should be aiming for for FIT purposes.

As for cost. How long is a piece of string. Many variables, panel make/type etc, inverter type/make etc etcÖ But, say you went for a 4kWp install on an easy roof with no shading options/split aspects, have 6K+ in your head and you won't be far out. Check out here for more examples.

BUT. You do not have a basic roof. You have split aspect, which bumps things up and needs an installer who knows what they are talking about. So don't bother going to Ikea if you thought about considering thatÖ

Shading is a killer for PV. Think of it like a garden hose with lots of outlets. You put a kink in the hose and all the flow is affected. So you get one panel in the shade, and it affects everything. It takes an installer who knows what they are doing to mitigate this, or paying extra for a system that can cope with this. Take a look at SolarEdge - it will help with your dual aspect too.

As for DIY. To get FIT, it needs to be all approved kit from an approved MCS installer. Im not saying you can't, but the complexity of your install and all the hoops you need to jump through, I would think that DIY really was not an option.

FITS decrease, but not huge amounts since I have been watching them. You can find rates, and limited future rates at Ofgen. FITs are affected by the EPC rating of your house. If you are band D or above, you get the higher rate.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2014, 10:29:39 AM by ianh64 » Logged
brackwell
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« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2014, 08:58:38 AM »

I suggest you contact  www.leeds-solar.co.uk    Very knowledgeable and honest. I have no connection with them.

Would not bother with the north roof - not cost effective and will have implications for the rest.

Ken
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pluggy
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« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2014, 12:38:05 PM »

If you do go for the north roof, make sure it's ,on it's own 'string' and invertor/input, that way it won't affect the others but it puts the price up and cost-effectively is probably not really viable. The steeper the roof, the less the north facing panels will achieve. 
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M
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« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2014, 03:54:48 PM »


the house is semi-detached and south,westish facing, but has a tiny roof. Iíll get about 5 panels on the front, 5 on the side and 5 on the back.

front and side get sun 3/4 of the day as it travels across the sky. back of house from 1pm in summer.

there is no shading apart from very early in the morning from the chimney and this would only affect the nearest panel for about an hour.

thx Ian

I'm not totally clear what the orientations of the rooves are, nor their relationship to each other - are they 90d apart?

SW(ish) facing would suggest back roof is NE, but getting the sun from 1pm onwards in the summer, suggests it's NW. Are your rooves SE, SW & NW?

Tricky to explain all of this quickly, but I'd disagree with some comments, stick my neck out and suggest using all 3 rooves may be the best option, if that's what it takes to squeeze 4kWp on.

You'll need to number crunch all of the combinations and costs, but a very simple example is to picture a house with small rooves, south and north. Both can fit 2kWp. A 2kWp system, south only will probably cost around £4k, whilst a 4kWp system utilising the north roof too, will possibly be around £6k. So 50% more, but the north roof should generate more than 50% extra, hopefully 55% to 70% depending on pitch.

As you get further from north (and south) the difference in relative generations will diminish a little bit as the now non-north roof grows a bit (compared to due north) and the now non-south roof drops a bit (compared to due south).

For a triple roof system, you'll probably need a SolarEdge install using power optimisers (I have these on my WNW roof). This will add a little bit to the cost (inverters are cheap(ish) but the PO's will cost a bit more). However this will also help with the chimney shade, and maximise the potential of each panel.

It's definitely worth considering all of your options, if only to dismiss some later on.

Here's a recent thread from the MSE site, where a potential PV'er Ray (now he's up and running, and happy) looked at every option, combination, layout, panel etc under the sun, and finally opted for a 3 roof SolarEdge package. It's a long thread, and I waffle on way too much, but it does pretty much explain all of the cost/generation possibilities, and with some real numbers for comparison, even some photos, before and after. Ray was also highly sceptical of using a north(ish) roof, but he's now number 4 on the MSE threads with a N roof.

http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=4909999

Mart.

PS Just to be clear, I'm not suggesting a N roof is desirable, but as part of a package, it may be worth consideration, if a largish amount of kWp can't be obtained via an alternative. M.
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Just call me Mart.     Cardiff: 5.58kWp PV - (3.58kWp SE3500 + 2kWp SE2200 WNW)
brackwell
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« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2014, 06:12:04 PM »

Ian,
I guess you realise that all panels are not equal size, so by going for more efficient panels for their size you may be able to get more on the better roofs. And the panels can be fitted in landscape and portrait.

Ken
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