Navitron Renewable Energy and Sustainability Forum

Announcements & News => Astronomy & Science => Topic started by: stannn on September 09, 2014, 09:49:13 PM



Title: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on September 09, 2014, 09:49:13 PM
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26177-no-easy-parking-spot-for-firstever-comet-landing.html#.VA9mUtddXts


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on September 09, 2014, 10:03:18 PM
I wonder what the escape velocity is? it must be quite difficult to land on a comet without bouncing off again. Maybe it has sink plungers for feet ;D

Desp


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: dan_b on September 17, 2014, 09:25:11 AM
I've read it definitely has some sort of anchoring mechanism to stop it bouncing away again yes. Incredible mission this one!


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: M on September 17, 2014, 12:00:11 PM
I've read it definitely has some sort of anchoring mechanism to stop it bouncing away again yes. Incredible mission this one!

Reading in New Scientist, the landing part (to be chucked backwards out of the main body as it goes past) will use a grappling hook. But I expect it's a very special grappling hook. [Edit: not a grapple, but a harpoon. M.]

[Further edit: "At the right moment the lander 'Philae' will be ejected backwards, allowing it to gently fall to the comet's surface, which could take as long as 12 hours. At touchdown the lander will deploy a harpoon to anchor itself." M.]

Alternatively, they could just paint a sign on it saying "I wish to purchase an extended warranty for my leccy goods", then 'Comet' will come to them, and stick like glue!

Mart.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on September 17, 2014, 12:31:28 PM
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26212-rosetta-landing-site-chosen-for-first-comet-mission.html#.VBlwEmt5mSM


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Ivan on September 19, 2014, 02:34:04 PM
I wish they'd hurry up and land the thing - it's going to be ages before it does so.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on November 03, 2014, 12:44:10 PM
http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/nov/01/rosetta-comet-space-mission-nears-end


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on November 11, 2014, 01:50:52 PM
More amazing piccys

http://www.theguardian.com/science/across-the-universe/gallery/2014/nov/11/rosettas-mission-land-comet-pictures-philae


touchdown tommorow :crossed

Desp


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: dhaslam on November 11, 2014, 04:23:31 PM
On National Graphic apparently but not showing up in programme guide yet.

http://advanced-television.com/2014/11/11/national-geographic-to-stream-rosetta-landing/


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: dickster on November 12, 2014, 10:28:02 AM
Via BBC.

released this morning to land this afto, results at around 4 pm. BUT they couldn't prime the booster which pins it down on the surface whilst the harpoony things are fired, so it might bounce itself back off when they fire!

Finger's crossed.....


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on November 12, 2014, 03:25:05 PM
http://www.theguardian.com/science/across-the-universe/live/2014/nov/12/rosetta-comet-landing-live-blog

Live link to Darmstadt, mostly seems to be waffle but worth a peep maybe.

Desp


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: dan_b on November 12, 2014, 04:14:48 PM
The lander is safely attached to the comet!


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on November 12, 2014, 04:23:55 PM
http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/11/12/uk-space-comet-idUKKCN0IW0QD20141112


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on November 12, 2014, 05:11:06 PM
Apparently the harpoons did not fire, but it seems to be ok. How many light minutes is it to the comet? I'm wondering how long the communications  delay is?

Wonders when they will start fracking it?

Desp

Edit, ah just heard it's 300,000,000 miles, so that's about 25- 26 light minutes or so isn't it?


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: dhaslam on November 12, 2014, 06:48:49 PM
The delay is 28 minutes.   Light is a bit weak for solar panels, a bit too far from the sun. 


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on November 12, 2014, 09:27:43 PM
ESA are saying it might have buonced as it landed, also comms are a bit intermittant and now it has lost comms as it is below the horizon in relation to Rosetta, hopefully to be re-established soon.
Hope it ain't fallen down a hole :crossed

Desp

buonced??


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Ivan on November 12, 2014, 11:07:43 PM
Watched the ESA live transmission as it happened. Shame they did not have more coverage of stats and photos - which I'm sure they had access to.

Very pleased to know it landed safely. Sadly they did not release the panorama image that they had promised. Hoping that will come out tomorrow morning, after they have finished 'processing' the image (=photoshopping out the aliens?).


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on November 13, 2014, 07:52:56 AM
Oh dear, it seems it did bounce twice the first lasting a couple of hours and the second seven minutes, the latest I have heard is that ESA are waiting to re-establish comms when Pilae can see Rosetta above the horizon again. Idon't know why that would take so long though, surely the orbital period of Rosetta around a comet of such low mass would be pretty short. I hope it hasn't fallen over so that the antenna cant "see" Rosetta. Or maybe those aliens are pikeys who have already weighed it in the scrappy ralph:

Desp


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Bodidly on November 13, 2014, 08:06:41 AM
Amazing achievement but ahh erm why?

OK we learn more about our universe but to what end? From the the perspective of a non scientist this sort of space exploration is as batty as it gets. I can't say I don't marvel at the ingenuity to achieve landing a probe on a comet stupidly far away but would it not be better to put these great minds and money to work on problems closer to home?


Sorry about the grizzle as I have mixed feeling over this  :)



Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on November 13, 2014, 08:24:21 AM
Human nature  Bo, it's in our nature to be inquisitive that's just the way genes work I guess.

Some of the tech probably filters down to the everyday world, how good a value that represents is always open to arguement.
I'm not sure how many scientists we need to work on our earth bound problems, most of them seem political "arrangements" rather than lack of knowledge to me.

Desp


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: martin on November 13, 2014, 10:34:11 AM
I see where Bo is coming from - we have food banks, people dying of the cold, or just committing suicide from utter despair (and that's in this "developed" country), so to see such projects as this leaves one torn as to the proper use of resources - the cerne abbas haddocks thing is another - gazillions spent on finding yet another brick wall in the loopy laws of physics (according to Stephen Hawking, God may be pis*ed off at being prodded and may explode). There's a whole raft of similar lunacies (often involving "flight" in some way or another) - more runways when we clearly need less (and less flights), and probably one of the sickest - the odious Branson's "nip into space" trips for the ego-trippers with more money than sense...... :fume


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on November 13, 2014, 10:53:44 AM
It looks a bit rough, out there.....
http://www.theguardian.com/science/across-the-universe/live/2014/nov/13/rosetta-mission-philae-lander-live-coverage-comet-esa


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: dhaslam on November 13, 2014, 11:42:21 AM
It doesn't do much harm to push the limits of  human achievement.    The  camera  used was four megapixel which was a good standard ten years ago.  Now  similar sized   cameras are common place. Part of the development is in coping with large amounts of data and a similar  machine now could  probably recognize  a good landing spot itself and could be much more energy efficient.     One of the biggest changes in  modern  industry is  robotic production of parts and  3D  printing of small components.   Space exploration has always had to use reliable robots, other developments that have partly come from space exploration  are PV and lightweight batteries.       


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: nowty on November 13, 2014, 09:33:12 PM
From the Guardian article,
“In the shadow of a rocky outcropping, Esa will attempt to adjust Philae’s solar panels to get as much sunlight as possible, having so far generated just 90 minutes of power out of a hoped for 6-7 hours. Philae’s battery is predicted to run out some time on Saturday.”

And even though this is not an astrophysics forum, there probably is no other forum where some of us can truly understand the issue and sympathise about the reduced solar power, shading issues and reduced battery life. I’ve even had to manually switch my own off grid inverter to standby this evening to conserve my battery SOC during the current poor weather.  help:

I only got 1kWh today and I'm 200 million miles closer to the sun !  wackoold


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: clockmanFR on November 14, 2014, 08:58:11 AM
Gosh!

I am with 'Bodidly' on this one.    

My Boys and I have discussed this on the way back and forwards to respective schools/buses.

We came to the conclusion that there are an awful lot of folk making a ruddy good living on the back of this project.

And all those paid scientists a whole career in administration.  :fume

A decade or two ago, as a Micro Engineer, http://www.bryanhorology.com (http://www.bryanhorology.com) , I was asked by a good friend who happened to be as mad as a hatter but was head of Marconi electronics R&D, "CM if I pay you for your time will you come and sit in on a few of our Blue sky meetings as we need some serious re-ality."

All highly intellectual so beyond me,  and some folk from NASA were there, in the end I was scribbling designs on the back of envelopes and explaining that "yes a die can be made for Alli bar extraction for mini radar systems with out to much costs, and yes those micro complicated transducers at 1mm dia, can be mechanical made by the watch industry by a particular auto machine but tooling up could be expensive, etc etc.

After 5 or 6 years all the wise mad hatters slowly retired and the Mediocrity Administrators took over. Things went down hill and I just stepped away from the new incompetents that were supposed to know so much.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on November 14, 2014, 05:53:59 PM
Gosh!

I am with 'Bodidly' on this one.    

My Boys and I have discussed this on the way back and forwards to respective schools/buses.

We came to the conclusion that there are an awful lot of folk making a ruddy good living on the back of this project.

And all those paid scientists a whole career in administration.  :fume

A decade or two ago, as a Micro Engineer, http://www.bryanhorology.com (http://www.bryanhorology.com) , I was asked by a good friend who happened to be as mad as a hatter but was head of Marconi electronics R&D, "CM if I pay you for your time will you come and sit in on a few of our Blue sky meetings as we need some serious re-ality."

All highly intellectual so beyond me,  and some folk from NASA were there, in the end I was scribbling designs on the back of envelopes and explaining that "yes a die can be made for Alli bar extraction for mini radar systems with out to much costs, and yes those micro complicated transducers at 1mm dia, can be mechanical made by the watch industry by a particular auto machine but tooling up could be expensive, etc etc.

After 5 or 6 years all the wise mad hatters slowly retired and the Mediocrity Administrators took over. Things went down hill and I just stepped away from the new incompetents that were supposed to know so much.



Well here's your chance to make a difference Mr Clockman, that poor little Philea is stuck between a rock and a dark place, it is only getting a measly one and a half hours of sun a day(67P day) because the panels are facing the wrong way......................they need a TRACKER. You should stop moaning about everyone else and give them a quote for one of your custom installations, I'll do the labouring for you if you want.  ralph:

Desp


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: clockmanFR on November 14, 2014, 06:11:46 PM
Roger Desp.

You will of course need transport.

May I suggest 'Biff' Enterprises Transportations,   ;D along with cooperation from 'Clivejo' electronics  ;D.

You will also need 'Greenbeast' for welding up a reasonable vacuum vessel for the ride  :angel:.

As regards command and control, I would on this occasion suggest 'Martin' as he can bark orders at a million miles away.  :hysteria

So that should do it 'Desp', don't forget Mr Lumpy.

Suggestions for Launch site Please.  help:


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: M on November 14, 2014, 06:12:06 PM
that poor little Philea is stuck between a rock and a dark place,

Desp

Very nice. Very nice.  :genuflect

Mart.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Bodidly on November 14, 2014, 06:14:25 PM
Roger Desp.

You will of course need transport.

May I suggest 'Biff' Enterprises Transportations,   ;D along with cooperation from 'Clivejo' electronics  ;D.

You will also need 'Greenbeast' for welding up a reasonable vacuum vessel for the ride  :angel:.

As regards command and control, I would on this occasion suggest 'Martin' as he can bark orders at a million miles away.  :hysteria

So that should do it 'Desp', don't forget Mr Lumpy.

Suggestions for Launch site Please.  help:

You can launch from our field. We are up at 700' so saves a bit of fuel  ;D


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on November 14, 2014, 06:53:14 PM
Roger Desp.

You will of course need transport.

May I suggest 'Biff' Enterprises Transportations,   ;D along with cooperation from 'Clivejo' electronics  ;D.

You will also need 'Greenbeast' for welding up a reasonable vacuum vessel for the ride  :angel:.

As regards command and control, I would on this occasion suggest 'Martin' as he can bark orders at a million miles away.  :hysteria

So that should do it 'Desp', don't forget Mr Lumpy.

Suggestions for Launch site Please.  help:

You can launch from our field. We are up at 700' so saves a bit of fuel  ;D


Looks like we have ourselves a work team Mr CM, isn't the vacuum vessel full of soup for the dragon Though? Might need a radio too, I'm told the local music is a bit tedious, come on then we'd better hop to it, It wont hang around for long. Sorry for the skidmarks in your field Beau whistle

Mart   ;) ;)

Desp

Desp


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: clockmanFR on November 14, 2014, 06:59:12 PM
Where is biff, when you want him?


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: M on November 14, 2014, 09:39:33 PM
You can launch from our field. We are up at 700' so saves a bit of fuel  ;D

Great minds think alike Bo. It just could work.

Old Mock, the mechanic, I remember him well,
He once built a rocket, or so they will tell,
From an old winding engine, that he found on the dole,
It was built in the Rhonda and powered by coal.
Sing fal-da-dal-dal-dal-da-day

And when it was finished, he painted it red.
And he called it Bethanual, or so it is said,
And he took it up a mountain on a night late in June,
To get that bit closer said Morgan the Moon

Sing fal-da-dal-dal-dal-da-day


Mart.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBrjdQIH8uw


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: clockmanFR on November 15, 2014, 05:07:50 PM
Well done biff,    :o for getting the thing to function again.

When you get back I will buy you a Pint.!

 ;D


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: M on November 15, 2014, 08:41:56 PM
I appreciate that there are better/more scientific reports on the situation, but I thought this article on Rosetta and Philae was apt, being as it's from PV magazine:

Philae sleeps, hope rests in the sun (http://www.pv-magazine.com/news/details/beitrag/philae-sleeps--hope-rests-in-the-sun_100017182/#axzz3JAhCsVm9)

Quote
Philae, Rosetta's spacecraft probe, has reportedly gone to hibernation in an unknown corner of the 67P comet after its secondary batteries could not be charged due a lack of solar irradiation. But all is not lost. In contrast, a whole lot has been gained.

Mart.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on November 17, 2014, 07:55:20 PM
Philae left footprints as it bounced across the comet.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26571-philaes-hop-skip-and-jump-across-comet-67p.html#.VGpRAmtYCSM


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on November 17, 2014, 08:23:27 PM
This is a very very slightly educated guess, but it looks to me as if the Philea probe is laying on its side or maybe upside down. In the last image  from your link Stannn where they show the dust cloud, the lander and its shadow we must be looking at a resolution of a metre a pixel or better. Other than the lander and its shadow there seems to be very little other detail, it looks pretty smooth even at that resolution. Some of the other piccys we have seen seem to show a cliff-like structure but with nothing else to give us a sense of scale. I wonder if we are not looking at a cliff, or small rockface but rather an extremely close up view of the ground? There is also a theory that one of its feet is not on the ground, I bet it's poking up in the air, again indicating it could be on its side.

Boo hoo

Desp


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Ivan on November 18, 2014, 01:40:40 PM
Laws of physics would dictate that it the lander hit the rotating comet and bounced off, then to an extent it will start to spin itself. Given the distance the lander had to drop down to the planet, the release would have to be awfully precise to prevent it from spinning very slowly on the way down. There's no air to blow it the right way round. I assumed they had gyroscopes to stabilise it during freefall. So far, they're not even sure where it is.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on November 20, 2014, 09:35:47 PM
Listen to Philae landing.....
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26593-listen-to-the-thump-of-philae-landing-on-comet-67p.html#.VG5eO9d_vtt


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Ivan on November 21, 2014, 10:23:36 PM
Some interesting scientific detail in that article which I hadn't read elsewhere. It's a shame that we have to wait for peer-review before any of the really interesting stuff is published. I got the impression that the scientists had deliberately censored any real data in order to satisfy their peer-review principles. Whereas I can see the reasoning for this, it would have been nice to release some of the raw data on the live coverage.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on November 22, 2014, 05:27:52 PM
Some scientists do get rather over protective of "their" data, mind you I suppose if you have spent ten tears developing an experiment and another ten years waiting for it to get to its target, one would be a bit miffed if scooped in the last week or two.
Nasa and ESA had enormous problems when the Hubble Space Telescope first started sending images down. ESA instrumentation was barely allowed any recognition, the NASA logo had to be prominently displayed on all images, and above all the flight engineers were only interested in flying the thing, they wern't at all interested in the science wackoold

Philae did manage to complete its primary 60hour mission which as far as I know has sent a lot of data back that will take months to analyse, and there is some hope that it will wake up when P67 gets a bit closer to the sun :crossed

Desp


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Ivan on November 22, 2014, 07:25:17 PM
I'm hoping it will wake up. When you consider how far away from the sun it is, I would think there will be considerably more solar energy available, even if the duration isn't increased. Jets of steam could quite easily knock it around (especially as it isn't anchored). However, the landscape did look fairly old in most areas, so I don't imagine the comet sees catastrophic remodeling when it gets close to the sun


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: knighty on November 22, 2014, 11:46:37 PM
lots of interesting reading here...

#http://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/2mw5ko/we_are_working_on_flight_control_and_science/


the probe weighed 100kg on earth....
on the comet it weighs 1gram (1/20th of an ounce)

to stop it spinning on the way down / when it hit, it had some sort of flywheel fitted inside to counteract the spin.... but it was set to turn off on landing (and spin down slowly by itself)


iirc, after the 1st bounce, it took 7hours to come down and land again!


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Ivan on November 23, 2014, 12:22:18 AM
That's more like it - really nice to see the guys on the front line talking so openly and to anyone.

I'd be very interested to learn more about the organic chemicals detected, but this looks like it's been censored for now. No doubt it will form the basis of their major publication.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on November 27, 2014, 03:33:02 PM
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26612-rosettawatch-homing-in-on-philaes-resting-spot.html#.VHdDnWtYCK1


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on January 27, 2015, 03:54:48 PM
This is from a free edition of Science Magazine.
http://www.sciencemag.org/site/special/rosetta/


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on June 14, 2015, 03:59:23 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/space/11673849/Philae-Europes-comet-lander-wakes-up.html


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on June 14, 2015, 06:24:00 PM
Yeah wonderfull news, hopefully its long sleep hasn't done any lasting damage and it will collect some usefull information and piccys. After all it was just waiting for the sun to come out.

Desp


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Ivan on June 15, 2015, 12:28:36 AM
Pleased and surprised to hear this on the radit this afternoon. Looking forward to seeing some more photos of the surface, and maybe even active jets close-up. It's going to be an exciting month, together with the Pluto fly-by in 29days.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on June 16, 2015, 09:27:37 AM
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn27723-philae-awakes-what-next-for-probe-after-7-month-nap-on-comet.html#.VX_ZFGt5mSM


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Ivan on June 17, 2015, 12:32:41 AM
Worrying that they're only managing about a minute's worth of communication at a time. Before it ran out of battery, it seemed to be able to upload large amounts of data, so let's hope repositioning the orbiter sorts this out. Would be good to see a few more pictures from the surface.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on June 17, 2015, 08:18:59 PM
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn27736-our-dream-scenario-for-philae--and-mission-finale-for-rosetta.html#.VYHDN2t5mSM


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on July 31, 2015, 04:52:31 PM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-33720951


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Ivan on August 01, 2015, 03:01:24 PM
I couldn't see anything relating to concentration - would be nice to know whether these are barely detectable quantities, or quite high concentrations. I suspect it's difficult to provide a concentration, as it was just sniffing rareified air containing variable amounts of dust.

Looking at the Rosetta website, they've released a whole load more photos since I last looked, including several of the 'bounce'

Shame they only sent monochrome cameras!


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on August 06, 2015, 12:15:09 AM
They probably have LRGB filters on the cameras but maybe they can't use them due to lack of power?

Desp


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Ivan on August 06, 2015, 10:37:17 AM
You could be right. In hindsight, I bet they wish they sent a slightly bigger battery or a nuclear TEG.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: skyewright on August 06, 2015, 02:50:09 PM
You could be right. In hindsight, I bet they wish they sent a slightly bigger battery or a nuclear TEG.
Sure, but then again, what they did decide to send has on the whole been remarkably successful. The landing didn't go to plan, but it did achieve a lot, and landing was always going to be a gamble.
They probably did the best they could with the technology, funds & weight limits they had available, with everything probably having to be justified though numerous committees, and all the time aware that even a small failure could be ruinous to the whole expedition.

20/20 hindsight is an awful lot easier than 20/20 foresight...  ;D


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Ivan on August 07, 2015, 12:04:54 AM
In the live show on the landing day, I remember them saying that it was built on a very tight budget, so yes indeed, they have achieved an awful lot more than they had hoped for. I think it's very sad that the landing didn't go according to plan, and even sadder that they haven't manage to maintain a signal with the lander after it woke up - I suspect it's ended upside-down due to comet activity, or something has fallen on it.

Applying 20/20 hindsight to a lot of missions would make them a lot more useful! I'm never ceased to be amazed at the likes of Nasa in the recent Pluto flyby - that they can be so confident (eg picking up the 20Watt Radio signal from 3+Billion miles away, and being confident enough in the space probe to relay the data collected in the 3 or 4 minutes of flyby, over the next 18months.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on August 08, 2015, 09:42:41 PM
Comet 67P is close to perihelion.
http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/aug/08/rosetta-space-probe-comet-67p-closest-to-sun


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: Ivan on August 09, 2015, 08:52:26 PM
They said the unexpected shape is due to a probable low speed collison between two bodies, but I think it looks more like an apple core. is the 'neck' of the comet the equator, in which case it's simply the bit that has been most eroded by sunlight.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on September 05, 2016, 06:18:51 PM
Philae has been spotted.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3774604/Philae-Rosetta-s-lost-lander-spotted-comet-67P-just-weeks-probe-s-suicide-mission.html

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Rosetta/Philae_found


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: desperate on September 07, 2016, 07:30:38 PM
Lying on its back with its legs in the vacuum?? svengo

Desp


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: todthedog on September 08, 2016, 07:47:31 AM
Mind well and truly boggled ;D


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on September 08, 2016, 09:43:12 AM
It looks like Philae was trying to get his leg over....but just didn't have the energy! ;D
Stan


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: TheFairway on September 30, 2016, 08:36:03 AM
Au revoir


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: todthedog on September 30, 2016, 10:01:08 AM
Just listened on the radio.
What a journey.


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: stannn on September 30, 2016, 10:31:23 AM
Sounds as if it will be a low speed impact which could potentially leave Rosetta transmitting data. However, as its 'dish' will no longer be pointing towards Earth, the system will be shut down to prevent its signals interfering with future missions.
Stan


Title: Re: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet
Post by: TheFairway on September 30, 2016, 12:50:37 PM
Thats it. "science on ground" - mission complete.

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CtmSNZRWcAAuwPz.jpg)