Navitron Renewable Energy and Sustainability Forum

Announcements & News => Astronomy & Science => Topic started by: Ivan on September 16, 2014, 11:19:38 PM



Title: Pluto
Post by: Ivan on September 16, 2014, 11:19:38 PM
New Horizons - one of the most exciting space probes of this decade in my opinion has surpassed the orbit of Neptune. Still almost a year to go until the flyby, but within a short while, it will be beaming back the best photos we've ever had of pluto.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/main/index.html


(http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/whereisnh/overview/nhov20140901_0381.jpg)


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: dan_b on September 17, 2014, 09:23:34 AM
Great stuff - some exciting space science happening at the moment - the Rosetta mission for example


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Ivan on May 28, 2015, 10:55:52 PM
Now only 46days to closest approach of Pluto. This is quite a landmark in Astronomy - I think it's the first new world to be revealed for several decades and the last of the classic 9 planets to be revealed, a century after it's existence was predicted.

Latest pictures (taken mid-may, released a week or so ago), show a fair bit of surface detail now - so it looks like we're going to get some exciting photos over the next couple of months.

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/News-Article.php?page=20150527 (http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/News-Article.php?page=20150527)


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Ivan on July 10, 2015, 12:16:32 AM
This is more like it:


(http://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/03fb61754aaf547bf8ff6f5870a0a63a155d25c7/32_0_988_593/master/988.jpg?w=620&q=85&auto=format&sharp=10&s=bb70ea1ac34aa16bf4adb5f9d0ec9ad5)


Still ~5million miles away, with the flyby occuring in 4days time, at which point, the resolution will be 500 times better than this image.


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: stannn on July 13, 2015, 07:35:04 AM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-33502944


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: nowty on July 13, 2015, 10:20:51 AM
Realtime Pluto photo gallery

http://spaceweathergallery.com/index.php?title=pluto

Latest,
(http://s5.postimg.org/kx3o3etpj/Patrick_Bosschaerts_071215_pluto_alone_0kopie_14.jpg) (http://postimage.org/)


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: stannn on July 14, 2015, 01:58:34 PM
Final full-frame picture before Pluto fills the field.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-33524589


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Ted on July 14, 2015, 02:36:29 PM
I really can't get my head around how fast this tiny spacecraft is travelling. 27,000 mph now and it was doing 51,000 mph when it went past Jupiter.

But, of course, the Earth is moving at an even faster speed around the Sun - 67,000 mph. Better nail everything down.


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: billi on July 14, 2015, 03:30:41 PM


i have to sit down now , ted  ..... i feel dizzy


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: todthedog on July 14, 2015, 04:23:39 PM
So your car is doing 67,000mph already Billi.
You want it to go faster!! whistle  stir: exhappy:


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: skyewright on July 14, 2015, 06:08:01 PM
But, of course, the Earth is moving at an even faster speed around the Sun - 67,000 mph. Better nail everything down.
& that's just the speed within the Solar System (i.e. rotation around the sun). The Solar System is whizzing around in our galaxy even faster, & that's moving relative to...

It's all relative, as they say!



Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Ted on July 14, 2015, 06:58:04 PM
Oh exactly - I was just referring to a frame that is relevant for New Horizons.

I think the Sun is moving at 450,000 mph around the Milky Way and that is moving at 1.3 million mph relative to the cosmic microwave background, or 2.2 million mph relative to other galaxies. (There are varying figures depending on where you look.)

It's getting more and more difficult not to fall off the sofa.


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Fintray on July 14, 2015, 07:08:25 PM
So your car is doing 67,000mph already Billi.
You want it to go faster!! whistle  stir: exhappy:

Tod, not faster just in the opposite direction.........


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: billi on July 15, 2015, 09:24:06 AM
So your car is doing 67,000mph already Billi.
You want it to go faster!! whistle  stir: exhappy:

Tod, not faster just in the opposite direction.........

like trout  ?


anyway ....   its fascinating  to  realize  how big our- not ours- ......the universe is ...


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: stannn on July 15, 2015, 04:09:01 PM
A bit of interesting background.
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1998/02/when-is-a-planet-not-a-planet/305185/


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: todthedog on July 15, 2015, 04:24:52 PM
Minor or not what amazing pictures.
Makes my mind boggle.
The sheer vastness just of our little corner.
Makes you appreciate the beauty and wonder of our tiny planet and the effort we should make to try and preserve it for future generations.


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: gravyminer on July 15, 2015, 04:26:59 PM
its why I hate travelling east on the M4.

All that fuel Im burning is being put into spinning the planet and Im still going backwards  surrender:

Travelling west on the other hand is awesome as I get a lift from the planet and add a further 90mph to the total.



Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Nickel2 on July 15, 2015, 07:17:43 PM

I love this stuff!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=82p-DYgGFjI

We only live for less than the blink of an eye, so miss most of it.
( Makes me take a second think at 'AGW' and see if any of it fits the model)


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: desperate on July 15, 2015, 09:30:43 PM
I like the idea of Nitrogen snow ;D you'd need a good pair of gloves to throw snowballs freeeze

I see the probe has reported back that the flypast was according to plan and that the data is on its way to earth as we type.
Brilliant.

Desp


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: stannn on July 16, 2015, 10:09:00 PM
I listened to a scientist on Radio 4 saying that New Horizons was already 2 million miles beyond Pluto. It has a little fuel remaining, enough to alter its trajectory by 2 degrees. They have another target in mind for flypast!
Stan


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Nickel2 on July 16, 2015, 11:07:39 PM
2 degrees at umpteen million miles is quite a variation. what did they have in mind?


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Ivan on July 17, 2015, 01:11:59 AM
I've been impatiently waiting for the Pluto images for the last few years, so very happy that we can fill a huge gap in our knowledge base about our solar system. Very little has been said about future targets, but they mention  Kuiper Belt objects:Quoar, Eris, Makemake, Haumea or Sedna. It's hard to imagine that all of these are within the potential trajectory of New Horizons, which makes me think that the press release that mentions these hasn't given serious consideration to this comment. I think New Horizons is continuing to study Pluto and take more photos as it recedes into the distance. Once they've completed this, they will need to alter their course pretty quickly if they are going to reach a new target, so it's hard to imagine that this hasn't already been discussed and concluded.


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Bodidly on July 17, 2015, 10:40:06 AM
I find the latest picture very disturbing
(http://s29.postimg.org/4p3q8mkxf/images_1.jpg) (http://postimg.org/image/4p3q8mkxf/)


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: todthedog on July 17, 2015, 11:03:28 AM
I feel a disturbance in the force.
 facepalm exhappy: exhappy: exhappy: exhappy: exhappy: exhappy: :hysteria :hysteria :hysteria :hysteria :hysteria


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: biff on July 17, 2015, 11:15:43 AM
Do You mean to say Beau,
                      That the citizens on Pluto already have Sky tv.?
                                                         Biff


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: desperate on July 17, 2015, 09:01:56 PM
Apparently there are very few craters on Pluto which implies that the surface is young which in turn implies that Pluto is geologically active which is a big surprise to the astronomers. A body as small as Pluto should have lost most of its internal heat from its formation and radioactivity, it's too far away from Neptune to experience tidal heating similar to some of the Jovian moons, so what is driving the activity?? Also it is quite mountainous which again implies recent geological activity, all very mysterious.

Desp


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Ted on July 17, 2015, 09:17:09 PM
I would have thought the fact that Pluto is covered in ice would be enough to explain the lack of craters.


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: desperate on July 17, 2015, 10:35:47 PM
It could I suppose, but there does seem to be a variety of surface types around the imaged areas, the mountainous areas are particularly interesting.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/frozen-plains-in-the-heart-of-pluto-s-heart

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/the-icy-mountains-of-pluto

in any case even if it was completely covered in ice of some kind, without an energy source to renew the surface relatively quickly craters would survive for quite a long time (or at least that's how our best theory goes at the moment) Nasa are estimating that the surfaces they have imaged are less than a hundred million years old, which in astronomical terms is almost brand spanking new.

Desp


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Philip R on July 17, 2015, 11:38:55 PM
I heard it on the TV yesterday, that the satellite will pass Pluto 1 minute and 20 seconds earlier than planned, when it was launched 10 years ago.
Looks like someone will be for the high Jump :fight. I was pretty impressed the arrival time was pretty well spot on, it is better than my arrival time to jobs !! whistlea

Philip R


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: biff on July 18, 2015, 08:24:19 AM
It has a lot of potential,
                          We could issue fracking licences on condition that they don,t export to earth. We could allow the GM guys to move there immediately, as long as they don,t carry any seeds and liquids with them. Then we could round it off with a dose of top bankers and politicians..errrr  wait.. That could come back to bite us. There is the making of a right monster there, facepalm
                                             Biff


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Ted on July 18, 2015, 12:22:38 PM
Nasa are estimating that the surfaces they have imaged are less than a hundred million years old, which in astronomical terms is almost brand spanking new.

Desp

I hadn't seen that. I was expecting the ice to be somehow (glacial movement under gravity?) renewing itself over a significantly shorter period - maybe 1 million years. The surface of the ice wouldn't have to move very much to wipe out any visible evidence of small craters.


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Ivan on July 21, 2015, 11:50:51 PM
Looks like it may have a sub-surface ocean.....which means an outside chance of harbouring life - who would have thought it?


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: biff on July 22, 2015, 09:34:41 AM
In 2014,
       The showed a program on the telly about new discoveries on the bottom of the ocean floor near the vents from which the gas,s escape. The new technology made it possible for the cameras to record the trip with much greater clarity than before and they discovered that things were nothing like they expected them to be. The laws of physics took a hammering. There was a large lake down there totally separate from the ocean waters that surrounded it. There were large ice like formations and on the shores of these lakes there were what seemed to be a community of plants and insects which were surviving and thriving in extremely hot conditions. The exploration was a great success but it raised 10 times more questions than it answered. If my memory serves me right, I think it was 3 mile down below the ocean waves. The point being, that if there is water under the surface of Pluto, then there is every chance that it has some kind of life form.
                 Biff


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: skyewright on July 22, 2015, 10:10:55 AM
In 2014,
       The showed a program on the telly about new discoveries on the bottom of the ocean floor near the vents from which the gas,s escape.
Here's a link to a recent In Our Time (BBC R4) program about 'Extremophiles' (the fancy name for things that can live in extreme conditions).
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05zl3v2 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05zl3v2)
N.B. Yes this is relevant to this topic, the findings about life in these situations are being applied much further afield - two of the 3 experts are "space" people & one of them is an "Astrobiologist"!


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Ivan on July 22, 2015, 12:59:50 PM
Astrobiology is a very exciting field. There aren't many areas where you can be an expert in a field that there is no evidence for, and may well not exist at all!

Was the 'ice' in the programme you saw, Biff, methane hydrate?  I would have liked to see the programme. There was also a deep drilling experiment into Lake Vostok(sp?) in Russia. Deep subterranean lake, that is effectively isolated from the rest of the biosphere. The idea was to see if life existed or even independently evolved down there. Never heard the results, but it would have implications to the sub-surface oceans of other worlds.


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: biff on July 22, 2015, 01:20:38 PM
I think it had methane in the name.
                                    It was not real ice but it looked like and behaved like ice,except that deep red and blue flames came out from vents in the side of it at times. Weird stuff.
 The water in the undersea lake was a milky green color at times and a different composition from the water surrounding it.
                                                  Biff


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: Ted on July 25, 2015, 06:36:48 PM
Looks like Pluto does have glaciers: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-33657447

Who needs multi-million dollar exploration programmes and expert scientists analysing data when you can just guess.


Title: Re: Pluto
Post by: stannn on October 03, 2015, 03:09:39 PM
Pictures of Charon.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-34420062