Navitron Renewable Energy and Sustainability Forum

CHP (combined heat and power) => Internal Combustion (eg diesel/gas/petrol engine based systems) => Topic started by: Greenbeast on April 11, 2015, 07:50:45 PM



Title: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 11, 2015, 07:50:45 PM
We'd love to move on to our land this summer, we've had a quote for a mains connection which we're more than happy with (45kVa/3 phase for 4k) but because it needs a road closure and i think the lead time is 3+ months for a connection.

What are our options for living entirely with a generator (over a few months of summer/autumn)


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 11, 2015, 07:57:36 PM
Our rush being that the g/f get's her full wage if we vacate the practice-owned property and also we didn't fancy trying to prepare the place in late autumn winter (or waiting till next spring...


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 11, 2015, 09:42:08 PM
sorry i seem to have put this in the wrong place!


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: billi on April 11, 2015, 10:16:15 PM
hiya,

sure , why not,  , live with a genny   only  for  a few month .....  , what genny do you have in mind ..., have you got future pans  of renewable s at your new place

probably a small dc generator  charging a small battery and utilize an off grid inverter could make sense .....


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: knighty on April 11, 2015, 10:44:27 PM
if it's just for a few months

then you might as well get a small, cheap, petrol generator

run it when you want to run a microwave / kettle etc.. (low power models)

for lights (12v) / computer (laptop?) just run them from car batteries, with chargers connected to extension leads so they charge when the generator runs
(or use rechargeable 12v lights, so you don;t need any batteries or chargers)

a nice slow diesel generator would be great, a big battery bank would be great, a proper inverter would be great.... but you'll end up spending thousands on something you won't need in a few months...  when you could do the same thing for 300 (ebay generator)


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: mike-b- on April 11, 2015, 10:57:10 PM
We'd love to move on to our land this summer, we've had a quote for a mains connection which we're more than happy with (45kVa/3 phase for 4k) but because it needs a road closure and i think the lead time is 3+ months for a connection.

What are our options for living entirely with a generator (over a few months of summer/autumn)

Hi reading with interest we were quoted 18k 6 months ago. :hysteria 300m. The house only cost 40k maybe thats why it was  cheap  facepalm


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Ivan on April 11, 2015, 11:18:41 PM
Amazingly cheap for providing a decent 3phase connection. We were quoted 17k to upgrade our transformer so that we could export 6kW instead of 3.68kW.

If you go down the DC route, as Knighty suggested, it would be very cheap to add a few PV panels to reduce the generator run times. The low-power stuff is quite easy to deal with. The washing machine and hot water would be a bit more of a challenge.


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: biff on April 12, 2015, 08:32:15 AM
A geni is something everyone should have,
                                   Keep it tucked away ready to fire up at a moments notice. I have a silent running Geni which costs around 650.00. It came on a pallet already,topped up with oil and half full of diesel,so all I had to do was pull the wrapper off and turn the key. It is not a lister by any means but it is economic and reliable,apart from me having to replace the solenoid on the starter,due to leaving it out in the elements and the water somehow getting in and dripping down on the starter. It is 5kva and runs full tilt for 6 hours on approx 4.5 lits.
                                                                        Biff
  Mine was called an ECO, ;D and of course hails all the way from China,!!


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: stephendv on April 12, 2015, 08:41:01 AM
I would go with a small petrol or LPG inverter generator like the one prepared by these chaps: https://www.edgetechnology.co.uk/index.php/edgegen/edge-gen-2000i-1-6kw-inverter-suitcase-generator-365.html
Household loads are typically tiny most of the time, sub 200W with sudden spikes every now and then.   So having a normal 2kW genset constantly running wastes fuel and is unnecessarily noisy.  An inverter gen will run slower and quieter under low/no load.


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: billi on April 12, 2015, 09:07:36 AM
.... not sure how good those are ....http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-SMART-3000W-PURE-SINE-WAVE-GENERATOR-DC-48V-EMERGENCY-PORTABLE-POWER-INVERTE-/111573801762 , but i like the idea behind it 

-a direct battery charging generator that automatically starts and stops  depending on battery voltage and  an off grid  sinwave inverter attached to it

billi


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: renewablejohn on April 12, 2015, 09:38:56 AM
Living on a farm and suffering from frequent power cuts we bought a lister petter lighting tower as I noticed even though it was running 110v lights it was a standard 3 phase genny which we had rewired to supply either 3 phase or 240V single phase. Being a lighting tower also allows use to tow it anywhere. Cost us 1k and 250 quid for the rewire.


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: skyewright on April 12, 2015, 03:01:16 PM
It might be worth having a chat with "Pete Power", or at least having a good read through the useful info on his website.

http://www.petepower.co.uk/ (http://www.petepower.co.uk/)

I've no connection other than as a satisfied customer. I first found him via a recommendation on the Navitron Forum.  :)


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: skyewright on April 12, 2015, 03:38:29 PM
It might be worth having a chat with "Pete Power", or at least having a good read through the useful info on his website.
I forgot to mention, he also has reconditioned machines...


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 12, 2015, 07:44:30 PM
Wow thanks guys!
Plenty to read and digest. I think a genny would feature in our futue anyway so it doesn't seem like too much of a wasted purchase.
Going to crazy on batt banks, etc early on does seem extravagant.
Would love to integrate solar pv in the future and i would like to fit solar thermal early on


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: jonesy on April 12, 2015, 08:44:49 PM
Would love to integrate solar pv in the future and i would like to fit solar thermal early on
Solar thermal was a 10-15 year payback for us assuming nothing broke in that time.  Better to buy more pv and an immersun IMO


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: billi on April 12, 2015, 09:49:39 PM
Quote
Wow thanks guys!
Plenty to read and digest. I think a genny would feature in our futue anyway so it doesn't seem like too much of a wasted purchase.
Going to crazy on batt banks, etc early on does seem extravagant.
Would love to integrate solar pv in the future and i would like to fit solar thermal early on

hard to say ,  cause one does not know your consumption and your peak loads , .... running a generator 24 hours a day for 3 month  and more can cost you a lot on fuel and generator as well ,

a 17 kwh  battery costs about 1300 , plus a 500 for a  direct charging genny , plus 500 for a 4000w, 8000watt peak 48v 230v pure sine wave inverter with solar charge controller  ..... sure thats  enough money  but then you have a  great genset , that has to run only a few hours per day, or very little in summer depending on your pv


billi



Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 12, 2015, 10:09:59 PM
Would love to integrate solar pv in the future and i would like to fit solar thermal early on
Solar thermal was a 10-15 year payback for us assuming nothing broke in that time.  Better to buy more pv and an immersun IMO

Fair point, i may have access to thermal panels, but would need all the ancilliary install items and plumbing, so maybve not such a good deal as it first appears.
The PV (and immersun) would be more generally useful


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: camillitech on April 13, 2015, 07:22:18 AM
When I first moved 'off grid' in the dim and distant past we were totally reliant on a genny yet only ran it twice a week for around 4 hours each day. This being for my wife to watch Eastenders, The Bill, do the washing and hoovering. Lighting was by Tilley, fridge gas, Rayburn wood and we listened to radio 4. It does not have to be expensive 'living with a genni', solar panels are cheap now so throw a couple of panels, batteries, LED,s and 12v laptop/phone chargers in the mix and you're laughing, most routers seem to be 12v anyway. Just size your genny for the washing machine and for eight hours a week a cheap Chinese generator would do the job. You could always recycle it in your forge when it inevitably dies.

Oh, and yes, forget the solar thermal if you have the roof space for PV. I'm actually going to install 60 Navitron tubes on my new house but it's purely because I've limited space on the shed roof that houses my thermal store.

Good luck, Paul



Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: biff on April 13, 2015, 09:03:22 AM
 There are that many different kinds of gennies,
                                                That it is difficult to make up your mind. The silent running genny is a lot heavier than the open design,it also uses a bit of its power to force the cold air through its cooling ducts. It is also very difficult to work at should you need to replace some little item like an AVR or a starter. Thankfully they are not required all that often. The open design is noisy. You just cannot get used to the noise. They just batter the ears of you and I am deaf already so I pity anyone with good hearing, Still, If you have no near neighbours, you could go for the cheaper open design and like Paul says,use it for the washing machine and vacuum cleaner etc or charging the batteries to power the led lights.
    Do not buy the pull start diesel version or you will put your shoulder out. I will post a pic later of the type that I had for years. They retail around 450.00 or cheaper. I run them for about 25 hours and then checked the head bolts and changed the oil.There used to be 20 different dealers selling this same generator with different stickers and different prices.
 One of the big advantages that the small open genny has, is that it is more mobile than the others and you can wheel it to some place on the site to work drill and grinders or saws with it, without the big long lead. I will have a pic hopefully before 3pm ish.
                                                                                             Biff


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: heatherhopper on April 13, 2015, 12:00:30 PM
GB
I wouldn't disagree with any of the advice on offer but it appears you are going to have a grid connection and living with a Jenny is just a very temporary stop gap.
When we moved into our off-grid property we were quoted an initial "budget" price of 28,000 for connection. I have no doubt the final cost would have been well over 30,000. So staying off-grid (our preference anyway) was not a difficult decision. However renewable you want to be your grid connection cost makes it worth while.
We inherited a 6kW generator originating in the PRC with a 2.5kW inverter charger and 6 rather tired 120ah HGV batteries. The generator was less than six months old and had already been "repaired" once. I took one look and a brief listen and ordered a proper generator. Sure enough the far eastern thing died (no compression) within a week and we had to resort to using borrowed portable jennies - first a 2.5kW petrol and then a 4kW diesel - for a couple of months April-June pending delivery of planned generator, inverters and batteries. As a temporary measure this was fine but it was neither cheap, convenient or fun whilst also trying to get other necessary work done. Below is an estimated breakdown of what it cost us to live that way - I'm sure you can do it for less, depends on your situation.
Petro/diesel used - 25-35 litres a week for the following base consumption
Heating and cooking all solid fuel and bottled gas.
1 old fridge/freezer
1 water 750w water transfer pump approx 2x30 mins per day
Minimum (mostly low energy bulb) lighting
1 Heating circ pump (heating is required here sporadically well into May)  2 hours/day over that period.
1 washing machine 2-3 times per week
1 Desktop PC  and router 1 hour per day
1 LED TV 2-3 hours per day
Various HI-FI units (mostly small) 3-4 hours per day
Some hand/bench tools - short durations every day
The generators were run mostly simply to recharge the batteries with timing to suit big users. We did run them occasionally for longer periods for tools. So very little idling time although I admit to sometimes getting fed up with switching them on and off and there was some wastage.
If we had had to buy a decent generator the cost (including fuel at rocketing prices at the time) would have been approaching 1,000. Note that all the required wiring etc was already in place and so there was no associated cost in this respect.
Worth noting that the two generators we borrowed had been little used and I believe have not been used since - the owners are grid connected. Nice to have one, just in case, but is it really a sensible purchase? If you can't borrow I think it would be worth asking around the various hire companies for a long term deal - at least you would have some back-up for breakdown and would not be left with a dust gatherer in the corner of the shed. If you do buy and expect to get some reliable long term work out of it I suggest you consider the pedigree quite carefully especially since it will have clocked up a significant mileage in the initial period.
If you intend to install renewables it is worth planning this in now. There seems little point in bunging in an off-grid PV set up to help out for a few months if you intend to have a grid-tie set-up in the long term.


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 13, 2015, 12:50:17 PM
Thankyou for your insights.

With regasrd to grid-tie RE, because we'll be living under temporary agricultural permission for at least 3, maybe more, years, i'm not sure how realistic/worth while grid-tying is?


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 13, 2015, 01:23:20 PM
Is it worth getting a smaller genny that can't supply maximum demand but having a battery bank that can, so you can keep the bank topped up (automatically?) with the genny but it's not expected to keep up with kettles, and high demand applicances?


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: camillitech on April 13, 2015, 02:18:16 PM
Is it worth getting a smaller genny that can't supply maximum demand but having a battery bank that can, so you can keep the bank topped up (automatically?) with the genny but it's not expected to keep up with kettles, and high demand applicances?

That's pretty much what that inverter genny that Billi linked to does and if it's only for three months then you can just keep throwing the worn out ones back to the supplier under guarantee. It really depends on what sacrifices (if any) you are prepared to make. Can you manage without a toaster? why not use a gas kettle, we need a fridge cos we're in the middle of nowhere but most folk pass a shop daily. Do you watch TV, me I'd happily throw it in the sea. If you're commuting daily you can probably plug phones and laptops into the car. I lived for four years quite happily on 'genni only' and used a gallon of diesel a week (half a liter an hour in the old Lister). Of course there were no laptops or mobile phones then and I was content with the old Pye Sailor radio and a couple of PP9's every month. If it's only for three months in the summer just look upon it as a great camping adventure  ;D


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: biff on April 13, 2015, 02:46:36 PM
Hi gb,
             You will have to wait a little longer for the pics, The pic posting program was wiped and we have to re install it again.
                                                              Biff


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: heatherhopper on April 13, 2015, 03:02:27 PM
Hmmm - agricultural permission. Not particularly familiar with such things but it sounds as if even the grid connection is not necessarily such an obvious go and do. Probably very different circumstances but I know of a couple of sites locally that were "developed" under such permissions and are now unoccupied but with a new grid connection which has added nothing to the value.




Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: biff on April 13, 2015, 04:43:19 PM
I have been off-grid at least 10years+ here,
                                Thing have improved so much that our generator has become redundant,unless I decide to power up some heavy duty motor or tools and I am not sure of the quality,In that case,a couple of switched plugs and a turn of the key,give me 4kw on tap. If we had the mains power into the house, I would still have a generator tucked away ready to rumble when needed. The mains power here can go down without warning and I would rather have my own geni than harp on about a fridge full of food getting lost.
     The other thing is the ability to move the geni around your site, to power saws and grinders, etc.
  It all boils down to each individual.s needs and frankly one will not know or understand how much power will be required or for how long it will be required until they live the life and the need arises.
  I always had a geni about me. Usually locked/chained into the back of my works van so maybe that is why I still have to have a geni nearby. My original geni many years ago,was a little honda 2kw or less. It was light and easy to move around and it was very reliable but I would not buy the bigger Hondas or the diesel twins.(no thanks)
                                                                   Biff
 


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 14, 2015, 10:00:22 AM
so should i be looking at 3-4kw genny? I guess if charging batteries it will always be working at peak efficiency regardless of actual household demand?
Or should i look for smaller (and therefore cheaper), it;ll just riun longer to keep batts charged, as long as the rate of charge is higher than rate of discharge over a period of time.
So a kettle would be a short term, high draw on the bank but the genny would run for longer charging back up and not have to deal with the peak demand

what size batt bank should i be looking at building? i know about sizing for demand, just wanted some indication what people have got (or had with this kind of set up)?



Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: billi on April 14, 2015, 05:51:23 PM
.... hmm , as i asked above , we need to know your average daily  kwh consumption  and your peak loads  , you certainly cn undesize a geny , if its for battery charging ,

i just estimated this one earlier
Quote
a 17 kwh  battery costs about 1300
cause it will live 10 years  if you only cycle her  daily to about 50 per cent or  take approx 7-8 kwh  out .....  , this battery you should not discharge harder than 3-4 kw over a longer period

a 2 kw pv attached to this battery would supply about 5-6 kwh a day in mid uk  in summer and schould not cost more than 1000 gbp  and would easy replace  500 gbp  fuel  over four month

billi


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 14, 2015, 11:06:40 PM
Thanks billi, I think at last check we were using 10+ kWh a day (maybe as much as 15)
So there might be some behaviour modification needed.
We have a gas hob now, but it stays with the house and I have an induction hob (with electric oven) coming back to me instead.
We're all led/low energy bills here but new place will be smaller. There'll be no gas, so will have a wood burner for heat/hot water.
So some usage  will decrease and some will increase


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: knighty on April 15, 2015, 02:24:17 AM
if it's only for 3 months.... could you go without a generator at all ? as Pete (I think it was Pete) said, treat it as a camping trip ?

charge your phones/laptops in the car when you're driving

cook with gas / boil kettle on gas oven


I guess it depends on if you plan to work on the house when you're there... you could get a small inverter generator for power tools etc.. ?

really seams a shame to buy a battery bank for just 3 months use...



also, you said 'land' not house etc... it there anything there ?  what are you going to live in ?


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 15, 2015, 09:47:35 AM
if it's only for 3 months.... could you go without a generator at all ? as Pete (I think it was Pete) said, treat it as a camping trip ?

charge your phones/laptops in the car when you're driving

cook with gas / boil kettle on gas oven


I guess it depends on if you plan to work on the house when you're there... you could get a small inverter generator for power tools etc.. ?

really seams a shame to buy a battery bank for just 3 months use...



also, you said 'land' not house etc... it there anything there ?  what are you going to live in ?
I really don't think we could live without a generator, the amount of use the d/w, t/d and w/m get would make it untenable.
I also don't want the genny going on for trivial things, or ticking over all the time. Hence batteries.

However i'm seeing that i could easily spend 1-2k on the most basic setup and, as has been pointed out, not need it at all only a few months later.
Perhaps we should reconsider our hasty move on site.

We'll be living in a twin-unit. there'll be no permanent bnuild until we have satisfied the LPA with our need to be there, that will be at least 3 years


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: JohnS on April 15, 2015, 02:10:01 PM
d/w, t/d

Do you really need these from Day 1.  You must be softer than I thought.  I have never had a tumble drier and you should not need one with the summer approaching.  At least until the autumn.

Dish washer - we only got one when our oldest child started on solids.  Up until then it was one cook, the other wash up.  And I had to do most of the washing up.


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 15, 2015, 02:12:23 PM
ha ha, i lived out a d/w and t/d up until last year.
My lovely g/f would not likely entertain the idea


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: JohnS on April 15, 2015, 02:16:02 PM
Notsogreenbeast

That explains it all.   :crossed    bike:   ::)


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: knighty on April 15, 2015, 02:18:52 PM
if there a neighbour you could run an extension lead to ?

you'd have to be careful not to run too many things at once...

with a plug in meter the neighbour would know how much you've used and you could give them say 100 for plugging in, and then 20p/kwh (or whatever)

neighbour makes a profit out of it, it's more convenient for you, and it'll work out cheaper for you too ?


(stick a 10amp fuse on your end, so if the fuse ever does go it's where you can get access to it!)


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: knighty on April 15, 2015, 02:21:14 PM
actually, what's access like ?

could a truck drop off a generator on a big forklift pallet ?


I've got one I don't need any more, was about to ebay it but you're welcome to borrow it until you have mains put in

30kw diesel, single + 3 phase, in a weatherproof housing thing, proper industrial one


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 15, 2015, 02:26:25 PM
no neighbours close enough

yes i reckon so, but wouldn't that be a little bit of overkill ;D


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Fionn on April 15, 2015, 02:59:36 PM
How close are the neighbours in actual fact?
If you use a battery based system you could run a really small charger (say 300W) 24/7 to keep the batteries topped up and have solar feeding in during the day.
You could get away with a very small (read cheap!) cable in that case.


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: biff on April 15, 2015, 08:28:10 PM
(http://s30.postimg.org/75igcjbi5/DSCF9760.jpg) (http://postimg.org/image/75igcjbi5/), This is my currentr standby,, standby generator.

(http://s1.postimg.org/51osutdzv/DSCF9762.jpg) (http://postimg.org/image/51osutdzv/)   This one has had a very hard life and no care. spent years lying in a drain between a mobile home and the tarred road and even though the frame rotted away and the exhaust blew off, It still started on the key and delivered lecky.

(http://s8.postimg.org/6na5x24tt/DSCF9763.jpg) (http://postimg.org/image/6na5x24tt/)  

(http://s4.postimg.org/wiqvarull/DSCF9764.jpg) (http://postimg.org/image/wiqvarull/) These are the engine and generator specs on the barrel. I have had this geni for a good 10 years.
    Do not buy the bigger one.
                            Biff


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 15, 2015, 08:42:49 PM
How close are the neighbours in actual fact?
If you use a battery based system you could run a really small charger (say 300W) 24/7 to keep the batteries topped up and have solar feeding in during the day.
You could get away with a very small (read cheap!) cable in that case.
About 4-500 metres?


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Fionn on April 15, 2015, 09:09:45 PM
4-500 would be doable for 500 in cable (which could be sold again later) if you're only going to draw an amp or two, the bigger issue would be the ownership of the land in between and finding an easy safe route to follow.


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 15, 2015, 09:29:01 PM
feels a bit impractical :/

Was swaying back to maybe it's not worth it, but not only will life be easier, its worth ~700/month in extra income to live there.

We just chatted and decided that we'd want a battery bank to cope with a evening of tv/laptop/lighting but would run genny during the day to run w/m, t/d and d/w


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: knighty on April 15, 2015, 09:36:53 PM
miss out the battery bank...

use 12v lights with batteries (led - lots available)

get a 12v tv (there's lots available)

charge laptop from 12v car charger


powered from lorry battery, charged when generator is running

done for 300 ish ? so thousands cheaper than a proper battery bank with a proper inverter, and a proper charger


or... use lorry battery and a cheap inverter, so you can wire it up to normal sockets / lights etc... (fit energy efficient bulbs)   - battery will be srap by the time you're finished.. but it's only a 100 battery

if it's 700/month difference, and you spend 2100 on batteries/inverters/chargers/generators then you might as well have stayed where you are and waited 3 months for the mains hook up ?


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 15, 2015, 09:40:27 PM

if it's 700/month difference, and you spend 2100 on batteries/inverters/chargers/generators then you might as well have stayed where you are and waited 3 months for the mains hook up ?

quite


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 15, 2015, 10:18:11 PM
it's easy to forget things! we have three freezers and a fridge, of course they will come on as and when (i know about boosting the freezers)


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: jonesy on April 15, 2015, 10:35:10 PM
Something else to thing about.  I'd go with a  cheap genny as the warranty will cover any real problems.  However, thing about how you will get and safety keep fuel. My 3kva petrol takes 1l per hour at load, but not that much less off load.  However I tend to use the gas genny, as the fuel comes in safe easily moved containers that somebody else buys and maintains.  And it's cheaper.  3 x 20kg bottles is around 60l of fuel.  
I haven't looked for a while, but gas conversion kits on eBay were popular.  
Some videos show people just piping the gas straight in!
3 freezers?  We've weened ourselves down to a fridge freezer and saved around 400/yr.  We now compost the veg/fruit we don't eat and buy a tiny amount if we need it in the spring.


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 15, 2015, 10:42:52 PM
Yeah i am actually looking at lpg gennies

Well we could probably get down to two freezers :p
one for us and one for the pets


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Fionn on April 16, 2015, 12:04:23 PM
It doesn't sound like you're willing to compromise much on consumption while living off grid.
In this case I don't think any investment in batteries or inverters etc will be worthwhile given the potentially short usage time. I'd just go with the smallest generator that will run your biggest load and put in a small throwaway 12V system with a few old car batts to run lights etc when the generator is off as has already been suggested.


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: Greenbeast on April 16, 2015, 01:10:25 PM
It is somewhat frustrating for me, when i lived alone with one cat i could have lived with such a light footprint


Title: Re: Living with a genny..
Post by: billi on April 16, 2015, 10:17:48 PM
.... on the long run , its about  4 p    per kwh    for battery  kwh   ontop of  the rest of gear  for an off grid  setup  , PV should be below 10 p  per kwh  allready ...