Navitron Renewable Energy and Sustainability Forum

WIND TURBINES => Wind Turbines and associated systems => Topic started by: fourfootfarm on November 02, 2015, 06:27:01 PM



Title: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on November 02, 2015, 06:27:01 PM
Been given a turkish turnip, a three blade 24v watt number as a friend is upgrading to a 48v system.

So far I've gutted the internals of the supplied controller to just make use of the rectifier as simply shorting the turbines poles to provide control seems like an ugly solution to me. So i've dug out an old xantrex controller and wired into a dump load.

So of course we've had absolutely no wind for days.

I tested the system by plugging a couple of panels in to make sure the dump load turns on and it gets nice and toasty when the batteries are charged.

Just hope 600w of dump load is enough to cope with the mighty generating capacity of everyones favourite breezy brassica


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: agrarian on November 02, 2015, 07:02:48 PM
Been given a turkish turnip, a three blade 24v watt number as a friend is upgrading to a 48v system.

How many watts?

Ag


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: stannn on November 02, 2015, 07:13:48 PM
Biff wrote a monologue somewhere about a Turkish turnip, after I uploaded a video of the 'production line'.
Stan


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on November 02, 2015, 07:34:23 PM
Its rated to 500w. But I think we will be lucky to ever see more than 100, I've got a metre rigged up to it and high hopes though.

I've read quite a few of the horror stories about them on here and elsewhere but as it was free can't really complain. Even if it only generates a few kwh then its still free power, which is the best /kwh rate going!

If it does turn out to be a complete dud at least I've now got the experience of sorting the wiring and control for it, so the next one will be a less steep learning curve. Still not brave enough to go full Hugh Piggot


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: stannn on November 02, 2015, 07:37:27 PM
Here it is. http://www.navitron.org.uk/forum/index.php/topic,20970.15.html


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on November 02, 2015, 07:47:31 PM
Thats the one!

The guy who gave it to us had it working fairly well though so I am at least hopeful, and worst case scenario it explodes and scares the cows and I'm out a days labour setting it up.

Worse things have happened at sea!


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: stannn on November 02, 2015, 08:17:16 PM
Here's an independent test carried out this year. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R8s4G_hb1RE


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on November 02, 2015, 09:19:15 PM
now, i'm no expert, but I'm fairly sure those magnets should be capable of spinning around?


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: biff on November 03, 2015, 12:16:26 AM
Your 600watt of dump load should be plenty, whistle
                                     Biff


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: biff on November 03, 2015, 08:52:34 AM
When you buy a lump,
                 You look for a decent stator or windings or something that tells you that the people who made it had some pride in their work.
  Unfortunately,today,there is that much rubbish floating about on fleabay,it is nearly impossible to buy something decent.
  One of the best buys was a little 200watt Chinese turbine which was selling new for 250.00 but again the bearings needed to be replaced and the oversized blades cut down. Imagine a 200watt turbine with a prop of almost 7tf. :o :o. These were meant to be cut down in exposed coastal areas. The lump was excellent and very well made apart from the bearings.
 There are still a few of these kicking about and if you ever find one be sure to cut the bladed down to 6ft. These can,t half shift and have no trouble dishing out 300watt inn a force 4/5. The bladed are easy to balance but the cast iron hubs need to be checked for hairline cracks. They furl out of the wind around 450rpm. They are an old fashioned design but they work perfectly if one takes the time to set them up properly. The stuff is in them.
                                  Biff


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: agrarian on November 03, 2015, 09:38:01 AM
They are an old fashioned design but they work perfectly if one takes the time to set them up properly.

A bit like me Biff

Ag


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: biff on November 03, 2015, 04:30:36 PM
I wuz just going to say that AG,
                          Biff.


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: Stevieboy118 on November 04, 2015, 08:38:41 PM
I'm seeing the 12v 500w istabreeze kit on ebay for around 160. Are they worth it for a 100-150w realistic output? (and i get a new toy while talking her into some more panels)


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: biff on November 04, 2015, 10:42:27 PM
10ft bargepole ,
                  springs to mind, sorry to disappoint you. Have a look for something else,
                                           Biff


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: Stevieboy118 on November 06, 2015, 11:00:17 AM
Cheers, more panels it is  ;)


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: agrarian on November 06, 2015, 11:46:07 AM
Cheers, more panels it is  ;)

Whilst Biff's probably right about the turbine in question (he's the expert here), don't be put off, there's a lot of pleasure to be had playing with the wind.

Ag


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on November 08, 2015, 06:58:13 PM
Well in the recent wind we've been having its certainly kicking out enough power to warm up the dump load a fair bit. But as i've not rigged up a  datalogging system yet I don't know how much exactly. Enough to make me think about raiding on old computer heatsink and computer fan to dissipate some of the heat faster from the dump load.

Dump load is currently bolted to a bit of sheet steel with an airgap between it and the wall to allow convection to do its magical work.

Contemplating setting up an arduino as a combined data logger and also temp sensing fan controller. However off the shelf fan controllers are very cheap thanks to our PC enthusiast friends.

I was having a think about mechanical braking. A thought occurred that a mountain bike style disk brake rotor could be added to the shaft with not too much difficulty. If they're strong enough to stop 100kg (220lb) of cyclist and bike whizzing down hill then they should do for a turbine. Main issue would be where to put the brake pads, though a bit of barstock attached to the heatsink should do it. Of for added strength to the turbine mounting itself.


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on November 09, 2015, 08:22:16 PM
Bad news. Seems like some of the FET's have gone in the controller and its going straight to dump as soon as its connected to the batteries. Completely destroyed my testing things set of batteries. Going to see if I can nurse them back to into life with some of the devils juice. Mains power.

In other news I now have two Xantrex C60's in various states of broken I can scavenge for parts for other projects. The first one lasted dutifully for years on a missmatched solar lash up before giving up the ghost and the good people in the States send me a free replacement with one day left on the warranty. The other either fell pray to my ineptitude or something has gone very awry.

Time to grit my teeth and get a tristar I think.

In other news I made a fairly substantial brake switch from a three phase 4t2p 50a isolator switch which works marvellously.

Onwards and upwards.


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on November 27, 2015, 02:53:54 PM
Question, if I connect up solar and wind to the same battery using the solar charge controller is it best to set the bulk of the solar charger to .5v below the cut in point of the dump load to stop the solar interfering with the turbine.

The C60 will be on its way back to me soon repaired courtesy of Mr Phil Barton. It wouldn't surprise me if he is on here somewhere.

Thanks


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: biff on November 27, 2015, 08:14:01 PM
FFF,
       I commend your bravery, The Pistedabreeze turbines are remarkable pieces of engineering and you my friend are having fun getting the best out of it,
  However, if you connect up the solar and the turbine to the bank, You will find that the turbine does all the grunting and the pv does all the work,
  lowering your pv output is going to drastically cut back your over all production. I would let the turbine dumpload set the PV peak, You can divert the excess pv power away to heat a little water.
  If you can get a little decent wind and a good bit of sun at the same time, You will be able to take the time to stand and watch the sunbursts brake the turbine.
 Our own house system is just like this. Every time I see our turbne braking in the sunlight, I know that our dc immersions are doing the business inside out tanks.
 Like you, we got started with a little 450watt x 12v Yang-Shen W turbine and two 80 watt x 12 v solar panels.
 Don,t worry. You are getting there.
                                      Biff
 


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on November 27, 2015, 09:32:28 PM
Hi Biff,

I knew they were shoddy from the start, rather than getting it free like I thought I've found out dear father actually paid good money for it. You can give all the advice in the world but some people just won't listen. Well even if it only throws out a few amps during the night at least it will slowly earn its keep.

They are much more fun the solar though, all they do is just sit there selflessly and boringly creating electricity.

I've been meaning to ask, where did you find your interesting and robust inverter?

I'm a little worried about wiring my panels directly to the battery are recommended as they will back feed at night, and if I put at diode in I lose previous amps.

The trials and tribulations we cause ourselves hey?





Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: biff on November 28, 2015, 10:28:01 AM
      "The trials and tribulations we cause ourselves" 
       Very true FFF ;D,
                        I went through a variety of little 300watt inverters years ago. I kept about 3 or four of them in a box and tried them all at different times.I even got one from Aldi.
      None of them were any good. i even got an expensive one from Maplins in a sale for 75.00 :'( . it was pure sine wave and ate the juice.
  Eventually I got a little APC, 650va ups and connected it to our 1200ah yousa bank. It is still there to this day. These are an old APC, pre timer, metal casing, little toggle switch with the green light for on and off. and very very reliable. no fan. 400watt. good on juice.
  The panels them selves all have blocking diodes. just make sure that you have your controller set to divert to dump on a proper rated dump load which is half as much again as your max.
  Wind turbines are brilliant inventions. It is great to see them working and doing the business. You are getting great experience and I got a feeling that once you get the hang of it, you are going to move up to a bigger one. I think that both AG and myself believe that the 2kw is about as much as one person can manage on their own but you can do a heck of a lot with a 2kw one or even a 1kw one.
                Enjoy!
                          Biff


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on November 29, 2015, 10:36:28 AM
Hi Biff,

I've been interested in building a HP style turbine since I found out about them, its a fairly hefty up front cost though and thanks to my general ineptitude I will no doubt mess it up somehow. But the turnip is a good learning exercise in turbine control anyway.

Our maplin inverter has finally about given up the ghost. It was on offer and I bought about 7 years it really without realising what it would be for (I think I was going to put it in my car) Long before any plans for offgrid life anyway. Its still chugging gently along but I think the caps have swollen so its producing about a 1/10th of what it should.

I've got at APC one too, one of the beige metal cased things, but I can never get the thing to cold start which makes it a complete pain to use. It does come in handy though as its PSW the little twin tub washing machines run much better from it.

One of the Stirling PSW ones came up on eblag for very cheap. I've read fairly mixed things about them, I get the impression Mr Sterling himself can be a little brusque. The plan is to have that run 24/7 to run LED lighting and slowly phase out the 12v lights, parents eyesight isn't getting any better so they need more lumens!

Along with the turnip came a powerjack inverter, which I'm not sure I even want to touch. It rated far too high for little set of 24v batteries I've got wired up at the moment, so I don't want to wire it in in case someone tries to run an electric kettle off it and kill the batteries. Oh reasonably priced forklift, where art thou?

This is where I get a little confused. I've read that oversizing the dumpload is the way to go. (Which i'd thought I'd done but obviously not sufficiently as evidenced by blown fet on the controller) But this means in order for the diversion controller to power the dumpload then you're not able to use it to full capacity.

So for a 60 amp charger. You can have 40 amps of generation and 60 amps of load including the necessary overhead. Is that correct or am I getting it arse about tit?

In a HP design 2kw is a 3.7 meter turbine isn't it? I think thats probably a little too big for us to manage at the moment. Thank goodness for tractors and winches though.


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: biff on November 29, 2015, 10:57:53 AM
Hi FFF,
      It might be an idea to post a few pics of your set up to give us an idea.
  I remember some years back a friend of mine had a 600watt Y/S. He lived by the sea in a very strong wind area. (really windy)
 He did everything right by the book, excellent dumploads, controller, inverter but he kept frying controllers. Each time we studied the specs and the way we had over engineered the whole installation we were bamboozled. Then I suggested a smaller set of blades on a 5ft prop. He invested in a one big lump rectifier and extra dump loads and that seemed to do the trick. However last week he was telling me that the heat during the latest storms was burning the plastic around the led charging light. He had reduced the size of the prop in the end, just like I did myself.
  I got a bad result one time by setting the dump load voltage too high,
                                                                         Biff


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: rogeriko on November 29, 2015, 12:12:37 PM
Most APC ups can be cold started by holding in the power button until it beeps or flashes about 5 seconds


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on November 30, 2015, 06:54:37 PM
Hopefully santa is bringing a new shed for christmas so I will end up moving everything into there. Best get the kingspan out.

Will post some pictures when everything is nice and tidy for once and the cats aren't trying to sit on the dumpload for warmth!

I've tried various tricks to getting it to cold start, the only thing that works is firing up a smaller inverter to warm start it. The other method I've heard of is holding down the button till you hear a beep and then letting go, but that can take up to 60 seconds. No joy though. I can't remember the model number though SU1000 something. It's one of the 2U ones designed to be rack mounted.


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: offthegridandy on December 01, 2015, 07:14:54 PM
FFF,  as a new convert to successful harnessing of the wind using the HP design, I can strongly recommend it.  The 2014 edition of his recipe book rates the 4.2 mtr at 1000w as is the 3.6mtr. The difference is in getting higher output at lower speeds with the larger diameter.

The designs are made to be rugged and reliable rather than maximum output. All of the process's in the build could be done by hand but power tools speed the job.  Welding is a required skill or could be subbed out, but all the other metal work and wood work are straight forwards enough.

HP reckons to allow about 1000 to build a 4.2mtr jobby.  A good tower is required for 4.2mtr and can cost regardless of the turbine on top.

Cheers.

Andy.


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on December 01, 2015, 07:41:05 PM
Hi Andy,

I have the wee Hugh Pigott book somewhere, not the step by step process but the glossary basically. Very interesting reading all the same.

The old man is an excellent woodworker and I know my way around a welder so the nuts and bolts are achievable. What I am most worried about is the stators and windings. One misstep and you've broken some very expensive magnets.

I like the idea of being able to buy in bits and peices.

On the other hand 1000 is almost 2000w of solar panels though. Though this november has been grim for output.


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on December 02, 2015, 10:06:52 AM
Found a small HP turbine up for sale for reasonable money, well, more money than I have but still reasonable.

I think buying one and reverse engineering it and creating a new one would be well within my wherewithal.

Food for thought.


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on December 22, 2015, 01:54:34 PM
Everything is now back up and running. Wind turbine happily pumping out the amps in these very strong winds.

Its averaging around 60w but peaked at a massive 220w while I was checking it.

Not bad for a turnip. Even one thats supposed to kick out 500w  whistle


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: biff on December 23, 2015, 08:53:00 AM
Well done FFF,
           You will soon be hooked like me. facepalm
 Yet, the experience and learning that goes with it will stand you good stead when you invest in a larger and more powerfull Turbine, So it is all good.
                                                                 Biff


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on December 31, 2015, 12:08:28 PM
Disaster strikes.  sh*tfan:

Frank has destroyed the pole the turbine was mounted on. Where the fibreglass pole wall mounted to a steel pole it has snapped. One of the guys had given way too.

Thankfully no damage to the turnip bar a small crack in the tail, easily repaired.  I'm going to dissemble the business end and see if there is anything rattling around inside.

At least now it's down on the ground I can extend the tail a little to cut back on the hunting behaviour.

I've taken the supplied controller apart and had a bit of a look. (Not using it)

There are three components. A cheap rectifier. A relay for shorting out the phases and a very simple circuit to fire the relay when and short out the turbine when the voltage threshold has been reached. I don't know how they can have the gall to sell such a thing at the price they do. You could achieve the same for about a tenner.

I'm using a Schottky rectifier at the moment I bodged from a few diodes I had lying around. Works well and despite my crappy soldering skills wastes less current than the supplied offering. I will invest in a proper one though.

The hum of PWM heating is starting to grow on me. But I'm trying to cobble together an automated AC dump load so that valuable heat goes somewhere useful rather than shed.

New shed is coming along, but didn't have enough ballast for the floor before the builders merchants closed for christmas so still not finished.


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: biff on December 31, 2015, 04:08:14 PM
You are getting great experience FFF.
                                    You are exceeding all our expectations getting it to work at all. If i remember correctly,,there is only one bearing on that baby, so you have to be prepared for some kind of failure soon. Just make sure that you are standing well away from it when it gets very windy.
                                                                 Biff


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on February 19, 2016, 09:33:29 AM
Some progress has been made in the mean time.

Have invested in some more dump load resistors so its sized to the controller rather than then generator. After blowing a FET and ruining my 'experiment' batteries I'm not keen on that happening again.

I've also cobbled together a cheap AC relay set up using a programmable voltage controlled relay from eblag. Its a neat bit of kit and currently I've got it set up to turn on a wee towel rail when the voltage is over threshold for more than 30 seconds, and turn off again when its back down to float. Remains to be seen how long it will last though.

This has a couple of benefits, it means extra power is getting turned into heat in the bath room rather than the shed and provides a bit of back up control in case the xantrex dies (which I am really hoping won't happen)

Shed is complete and will begin moving in soon I hope!


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on February 26, 2016, 07:36:15 PM
Van is currently sagging more than a little at the moment  exhappy:


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on March 14, 2016, 11:55:39 AM
On going adventures in turnip land.

Turbine is back up and running smoothly. Though as its connected to the same controller as a couple of solar panels it does very little when there is bright sunshine.

Now the proud owner of a 1000ah battery bank @ 24v. I've not actually done a load test on them yet to see if I have anything actually approaching that, and I suspect not, but even half that capacity is a massive step up. The joys of buying used batteries!

Been having a thorough read through Oztules powerjack modification sprees. I see Clockman has been doing much the same and I'm looking forward to his upcoming publication.

I have also discovered that ferrite cores are extremely brittle.

Experiments are continuing a pace with the crazy paving panels.

I measured the short circuit current and open circuit voltages of a couple and they were pretty good. Each panel put out 20v in direct sunlight while pointed straight at the sun, and put out around 6amps.

The first lot I have given a couple of coats of clear acyrlic varnish to rewaterproof them which had no effect on the current output. This is while facing directly at the sun. The internal crazy paving shading issue will come into play when they're at an angle but to mitigate this I'm thinking about putting in a split east west facing array, this will cut down on peak midday production but might smooth out generation a bit.


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: biff on March 14, 2016, 02:18:56 PM
Hi FFF,
      Your little turbine brakes in the sunshine, but it will take off after dark.
                                                Biff


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on March 26, 2016, 05:07:51 PM
Very windy here. Got 15amps out of the turnip before I lost my nerve and stuck the brake on. Weather forecast is to calm down in a few hours.

Probably a record for one of these. A whole 400 watts.






Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: biff on March 26, 2016, 06:10:31 PM
Very windy once again here today,
                      Both turbines up in the dump load volts. The 48v one is really dishing out the amps topday .
        Grinder and drills + lights running for a few hours. I did the drilling and cutting steel with the 48v installation and the voltage hardly dropped down from 56v,s
               Just a nice force 6 coming in from the sea, the perfect wind.
                                                                   Biff


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on March 28, 2016, 11:02:41 AM
Busy day rewiring yesterday. Ideally I'd like to achieve the RE equivalent of this sort of thing.

(http://i.imgur.com/S479nXj.jpg)

But that's never going to happen!

Still much tidier now and safer. Spanner welding is a fine art I'm sure but not one I'm keen to practice.


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on April 11, 2017, 09:42:51 PM
How things do move on...

A year later that turkish turbine is still going! Its still only putting out 50w or so in a stiff breeze but its nice to hear it going, and 50w is a fair few LED lights.

Currently mid rewiring the new shed v1.1 which has been extended slightly since last time.

Forklift batteries survived the winter and are still good, SG checked them all and all cells seem happy which is a miracle and they're happily soaking in the spring sunshine.

I'm now the proud owner of 9x 320w panels. Now I just have to decide how I'm actually going to wire them. I've run out of space on the house roof so have moved onto the barns which have a very sold wrinkly tin roof.

Here I have reached a bit of an impasse. If i rewire for 48v I will need a new inverter, but less charge controllers.

How ever charge controllers that can do 48v are much more expensive than the shed grade 24v stuff.

Part of me wants to cobble together 24v for now and make do and just eat the losses. Part of me wants to drop 500 I shouldn't spend on an outback/midnite/ts-60

Decisions decisions...



Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: camillitech on April 12, 2017, 07:17:23 AM
Good news about the batteries FFF, once you get that extra PV up they'll really 'come back to life'. 'Decisions, decsions, decsions' story of my life and good luck with it  ;D How far is it from your barn roof to batteries? Does the barn already have 230V? if it's a long way and the answer to the 230V is yes then I'd 'AC couple'. If not so far I'd just go 'straight to battery' with that amount of PV and 'eat the losses' either way you'll need a diversion like the one you just sold  :hysteria

Good luck, Paul


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: biff on April 12, 2017, 11:22:50 AM
And that Xantrex controller could have done, 
         12,v  24v and                                               48v*  ahhhhh ;D
                                    Biff


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on April 12, 2017, 02:06:47 PM
Good job I've got a bunch of spare TS45s then too.  bike:

It's only 20ft from house to barn, so maybe double that for cable run once I've got it nice and neat.

No 230v on the barn yet but there will be once I've got these panels up and then can run wiring for 230v to it cant risk people plugging in daft things there and leaving them on.

Had an another devious possible demented notion.

Now that you can get genuine 10a MPPT controllers for 20 the idea of panel level microcontrollers appeals slightly. Would be cheap and extremely dodgy and possibly not even work. But you never know till you try!


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: camillitech on April 12, 2017, 02:12:45 PM
Good job I've got a bunch of spare TS45s then too.  bike:

It's only 20ft from house to barn, so maybe double that for cable run once I've got it nice and neat.

No 230v on the barn yet but there will be once I've got these panels up and then can run wiring for 230v to it cant risk people plugging in daft things there and leaving them on.

Had an another devious possible demented notion.

Now that you can get genuine 10a MPPT controllers for 20 the idea of panel level microcontrollers appeals slightly. Would be cheap and extremely dodgy and possibly not even work. But you never know till you try!

Well, if it's only a 40' cable run I wouldn't feck about with anything, just go 'straight to battery' and use your TS45's as diversion to hot water, no contest.


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on April 12, 2017, 02:56:32 PM
That's what I thought. The drive to tinker never ceases, and the enticement of pretty displays and MPPT efficiency is quite a lure too. But keeping it simple is a virtue in itself.

I'll keep an eye out for a 48v inverter in budget and when it comes to it change then, no rush I suppose!


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on September 16, 2018, 07:40:16 PM
Turnip finally given up the ghost.

My shed was tidied at somepoint without my knowledge and it looked like a connection to the rectifier came loose. Then over speed and then blades falling off. Thats my post mortem anyway. Not got the PMG down yet to have a look at it.

I could probably fix it but tempted to use the PMG for something else.

(https://i.imgur.com/4VVURNp.jpg)

Front fell off!

The black (Istabreeze) 500w blades vs Navitron 300w Guess that'd be why it never generated more than 150w in a hurricane then.

Bodging 12v self regulating turbine to be normal turbine (Temp installation until I get some rectifiers which actually fit properly

(https://i.imgur.com/x2wSPil.jpg)

Still breeze today so stood up on top of the berm to see if it would actually spin fast enough to put out 24v and it seemed to belt out the amps pretty happily.

Thanks to Navitron for the massive pile of turbine stuff.

When I've got it flying will post some more pictures.


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: biff on September 16, 2018, 08:46:36 PM
Well done FFF,
                 It give yee a nice warm glow to see the amps appearing on the clock after your rectifier block repair job.
      You have much better control and performance if you take the 3 phase down the tower and inside and rectify next to the controller on a nice cool heat sink,
  I did the same job on an Aelous 300 It never really worked right until i did that. ;D
  I recall many years ago, This wild life expert going to a remote island of the Scottish coast for 6,months.,  He took an Aelous 300 with him and the first serious storm, it blew the rectifiers. he seemed to be pretty handy and figured out immediately what was wrong, That is how i learned about removing the rectifiers in the turbine head and keeping them handy somewhere on ground level,
                                    Biff


Title: Re: The Turkish Turnip flies
Post by: fourfootfarm on September 16, 2018, 09:08:08 PM
This rectifier was formerly at ground level servicing the turnip. Unfortunately I think the slip rings on the navitron machine are only for plus and minus. For the third phase I'd have to take the slip rings off and run the cabling down the middle. Thats doable with seasonal untangling I guess.

I've got plenty of turnips to got at so might try that on another one!

Can tell why navitron stopped selling them. The quality of the blade mount castings is a bit suspect, one of them the hole wasn't even in the middle! The pmg's seem fairly decent though.