Navitron Renewable Energy and Sustainability Forum

General Renewable Topics => Off-Topic => Topic started by: Griffen on May 10, 2019, 11:04:24 PM



Title: Living on an Island
Post by: Griffen on May 10, 2019, 11:04:24 PM
We are in the process of buying a cottage on a small Irish island that can get cut off for a week or two in the winter. The ferry is a small open boat powered by an outboard motor. Apart from having at least two weeks supplies in has anyone got any other tips?

I'm thinking it might be wise to have a back up generator for instance  & a good first aid kit. Helicopters will fly in for a medical emergency but not in bad weather.

I'm sure I forgotten something.  Griffen2 is just thinking of the fishing  ::)


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: oliver90owner on May 10, 2019, 11:41:04 PM
Is this the only inhabited dwelling on the island?


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: Griffen on May 10, 2019, 11:51:08 PM
There are about 6 other houses that are lived in all year round ..with another 8 that are holiday homes. At 60 + we shall be the "babies".
There are more hares than there are people.


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: oliver90owner on May 11, 2019, 12:52:13 AM
In that case my tip is to ask what t’others do to get over the isolation periods.


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: billi on May 11, 2019, 08:26:26 AM
Hello,  that sounds lovely

We had indeed several powercuts in County Cork over the last few years , so id say its essential  to think about those times
Well a candle light dinner should be celebrated  anyway
its probably worth while to look at the new grant scheme  for PV with battery  in Ireland , sure its not massive  ,  but its 800 Euro per  installed kWp

If there is land  with the cottage , buit a greenhouse   :garden

Have fun

Billi


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: Griffen on May 11, 2019, 10:52:56 AM
Yes,we have asked some of the residents how they coped & an emergency two week supply  was reckoned to be adequate most years with a preponderance of tinned & dried food.Since all solid fuels have to be brought onto the island we shall be putting in a 4kw grid tied solar panels to power infra red heating.  From previous experience in the winter we know that thick field stone walls act as a good heat store  & only need to be run about 1 -2 hours a day  if the house is well insulated. The IR panels combined load will be 5kw  but we can spread that out through the day  or maybe use the night saver rate.

Billi, Definitely having a leanto greenhouse ..this along "the front" of the cottage to act as an air lock to main porch & also to allow the windows to be opened so that the hot air can get into the house. I think you are using a similar system ? The original back wall is "protected" by a long 15 year old kitchen/bathroom extension. We have had a few power cuts over the years in Connaught too so have a couple of oil lamps & cook by bottled gas .

The fun will start with actually moving furniture to the Island .

The Ferry

(https://i.postimg.cc/185Q1W5N/Ferry-moored-resized.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/185Q1W5N)

 Griffen 2 is looking forward to buying a boat & a grey Fergie. Unfortunately most he has looked at are show ponies with important hoses, nuts & bolts & hoses  slathered in paint so they look good on tractor runs.

 Road to the cottage. Council Maintenance Crew rarely spotted.

(https://i.postimg.cc/BXvBG43c/Road-to-Cottage.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/BXvBG43c)

 The Driveway.

(https://i.postimg.cc/gXQmkG5X/P1010135.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/gXQmkG5X)



Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: biff on May 11, 2019, 11:05:31 AM
Great stuff Griffen
                  We wish you every success in your new home.
 Paul ( cammilitech) would be a very successful Island dweller but unfortunately he is not available to comment at the moment. He is outside the WiFi range and it must be driving him nuts at present. His Ferry was relocated to act as a stand in for another Island Ferry until repairs were finished. So it could be a few weeks yet till he gets back.
    His blog is famous.  " life at the end of the road"
   Google it and enjoy.
        Biff


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: todthedog on May 11, 2019, 12:32:18 PM
Biff got there before me ;D

Paul's blog

https://lifeattheendoftheroad.wordpress.com

Sounds great.


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: renewablejohn on May 11, 2019, 01:56:13 PM
Whatever the bushes are next to the cottage plant a lot more of them then at least you will have a biomass supply for the depths of winter. Dont worry about branch size as it can all go into woodchip for a woodchip burner or turn it into compost. Normally on Irish Islands getting any sort of biomass to grow is normally a problem.


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: oliver90owner on May 11, 2019, 02:01:02 PM
Seems like a small wind turbine might no go amiss?  PV panels may not generate more than a tiny amount - especially if the isolation occurs in the depth of winter with foul weather.

A Hugh Piggot design, or one like Biff’s (a chinese clone of nothing in particular!)


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: biff on May 11, 2019, 02:22:10 PM
A wind Turbine to cut the mustard in winter is a must.
       Like Rab says.  Hugh Piggott designed  W/T would be good and they are designed to stand up to extreme weather.
 Some Chinese W/Ts like Xmork are very sturdy with very good furling. My Yang-Shen needed to be tweaked and fitted with smaller blades.  Then it became very reliable and productive.
  Pv is nice and cosy reliable but come the winter months the Turbine is the one that saves fossil fuel big time .
   Learning to fly a decent Turbine is something that will take a few months but it is one of the most rewarding and addictive occupations you could tackle . You really get to love your turbine. Everybody has different ideas on how to do it but the basics are the same
    Lovely place Griffen. :crossed
              Biff


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: camillitech on May 11, 2019, 07:56:20 PM
We are in the process of buying a cottage on a small Irish island that can get cut off for a week or two in the winter. The ferry is a small open boat powered by an outboard motor. Apart from having at least two weeks supplies in has anyone got any other tips?

I'm thinking it might be wise to have a back up generator for instance  & a good first aid kit. Helicopters will fly in for a medical emergency but not in bad weather.

I'm sure I forgotten something.  Griffen2 is just thinking of the fishing  ::)

How do G,

well, as Biff says I've lived on Islands for long enough and without the luxury of a grid connection since 1985. Dunno about Eire but Scotland has been pretty good in keeping 'the lights burning' this last few years. Long gone are the days when the island was left without power for days on end. 20 years ago a 'back up' generator would have been essential here, but these days (in the UK at least) methinks the suppliers get fined so much by OFGEM, or whoever, that the power is rarely off for more than a few hours. Having said that, me being 'off grid' hasn't had a power cut in thirty years  ;D As for 'emergency services' (here at least) we seem as well served as most cities so I'd certainly not be worried by that. What I would do though is make sure your teeth are in good shape and have any dodgy ones removed. I don't think you'd get a helicopter or lifeboat out for toothache but it certainly can ruin your day/week  ;)
Buy a big efficient freezer and keep it well stocked. Get a blackboard and put it somewhere obvious so that you can write down essential items for the monthly shop cos there's nowt worse than arriving home after a 'big shop' and realizing you have run out of garlic. Always have plenty of USB cables cos there is nothing worse than getting some new bit of hardware that don't have one  :fume Frozen milk is always better than UHT and corned beef has a million uses  ;D Having said that I couldn't eat either for years cos I was sick of them after four years on an island without any electricity  ::) And oily fish are better salted than frozen  ;D

Good luck, Paul


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: ecogeorge on May 11, 2019, 08:02:59 PM
My 2p.........
-buy the most energy efficient freezer you can afford - some will do 36 hrs no electric...
Candles/ parrafin lamp , -i have a parrafin lamp from navitron with built in radio !!!
Bread maker - store 2 wks supply flour /dried yeast
-solar pv / wind turbine
-cheap generator
-is there clean water on island
-lay 2 wks supply of wine into cellar.
-poly tunnel
chickens -eggs and meat
-maybe goats ? milk / meat ??
Wood burner -any wood on island ? fast growing willow saplings ??

very jealous -can you share the location ??
We need phoros as always .......
George.


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: Scruff on May 11, 2019, 08:42:43 PM
I live on an island...so does Biffer...so do most of the residents.  ralph:

Mainland Éire midlands has power cuts a few days usually around when the 10 year storm hits annually.
I have many backup generators of an non-ICE flavour...far more useful and reliable, they smell better, they're not obnoxiously loud and I can reload them with sunlight.


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: biff on May 11, 2019, 09:52:26 PM
Reloading with sunlight is incredibly  satisfying.
   No sound. Noise or smells just like Scruff says.
     Today our Rads stayed on for hours on end. Even our WBS was warm to touch. We will  never get used to that. exhappy: so even though it is chilly outside the house is toasty roasty and will stay warm till midnight.
    It is forecastin NO RAIN for all of next week. ARRGGHH  I will have to water our fruit trees and my lovely plum tree.
 Our swallows are back in good numbers. It was good to see them speeding through the trees and round the shed catching midges by the thousands.
  Griffen. .don't forget the midge spray and take a roll on of Jungle with you. There is nothing worse than trying to do a little work and getting chewed alive with the midge
       Biff


Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: todthedog on May 12, 2019, 06:13:45 AM
Just to keep the pot stirred. Not an island but very rural France.

As much PV as you can afford, ground mount is easy.

Very definitely a wind turbine,2kW  is probably as much as you can manage by yourself easily. We had a Senwei, an exmork clone good self furling. Would have loved one like Paul's but lack of dosh would not allow, also not so vital as we had mains electricity. Worth forking out on a system that allows for easy dropping of the turbine if big storms are approaching.
Keeps stress to a minimum and saves washing of underwear!

Solar thermal, our first install gave us hot water with no electricity from March to November, add a diverter from your other renewables to the hot water tank and the season can be extended. Biff has written extensively about this idea.

A small emergency gennie completed our mix. We had no mains electricity for a week following a storm, kept our freezers down to temperature by running an hour a day.

Small LED lamps for emergencies, batteries last forever, LED headtorch are brilliant for moving around after dark outside.

We were self sufficient in meat and veggies, two poly tunnels and three very efficient chest freezers to store both meat and veg.

Make your own bread satisfying and so much better than shop bought.
https://www.navitron.org.uk/forum/index.php/topic,20136.0.html

If 'grow your own' ticks your boxes a rotavator is a real boon.

Good luck.








Title: Re: Living on an Island
Post by: billi on May 12, 2019, 11:54:10 AM
Hi Griffin

that looks  sound  and sweet  as we say in west cork ......  


Yes true,   i am a fan  of passive solar in Ireland  and  absolutely enjoyable to sit in a glass house  in all sorts of weather and the elements  here  

Amazing volume of warm air one can ventilate from a  glasshouse into an old cottage  on a sunny wintersday    , very joyful  place all year round



Billi