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 1 
 on: Today at 04:34:15 PM 
Started by Greenbeast - Last post by dan_b
I think the idea for the black cab was that for the urban stop-start city-centre daily drive, the battery range will cover that quite easily - road trips in London take a long time but don't cover many miles -  but it's the the trips out and back (e.g. to home) which will certainly end up needing the ReX.   But as to the range needed to make it worth "considering" - that's a red herring. With the TfL rules on emissions now in place, it's impossible to buy a new regular diesel or petrol-only vehicle for a taxi which would meet the regulations, and there are currently no other options - so when the Cabbie needs a new Cab to replace the old belcher, it's EV or nothing. 

 2 
 on: Today at 03:46:17 PM 
Started by Greenbeast - Last post by Artiglio
Musk is a genius visionary and made enough money and hype to get some of those visions to reality, how well that works in the long term remains to be seen. Arguably the Teslas are too clever for their own good and risk not becoming a long term success through their trailblazing stepchange in design and development over the rest of the EV industry eventually being a hindrance, whilst the competition learn from Musks errors and eventually best him, though i wish him every success.
Tesla really only gain their place at the fore because they are the only vehicles with good range, unless i could have a car that i can charge and do 250 miles in real world, im not interested, so itll be a long time till the market satifies my needs at a price i can afford.
My brother in law is a black cab driver, he was quite excited at the prospect of the electric cab, but in his words its a joke, the calculated real world range on electric from a full charge is just 64 miles ( as yet hes not heard from a cabbie who has one what the actual figure is), so he reckons in a normal day hed either spend too long tethered to a charging point or be too reliant on the range extender petrol engine. He needs 200 miles of reliable range to make it worth considering.

 3 
 on: Today at 02:47:31 PM 
Started by M - Last post by dan_b
Apparently the UK hasn't built any pumped hydro storage for 30 years.

https://www.theengineer.co.uk/first-new-uk-pumped-hydro-scheme-for-30-years-given-go-ahead/

This report reckons there's space in the UK for 50GWh of pumped storage to be built

 4 
 on: Today at 02:44:33 PM 
Started by M - Last post by jtp10000
With regards to storage, I can't but believe that vehicle to grid tech may provide everything needed. I did some (cigarette pack) figures, which suggested that if we have several million EVs with average batteries of 60kWh, that's an immense amount of spare capacity given that people would only use a fraction of their battery for travel each day.
Back to that 500GWh's, if we consider 30m EV's of 50kWh+ each, then we have around 1,500GWh's of potential storage, grid back up. I think, assume, guess, that 1/3 of the fleet may be plugged into smart chargers at any given time giving us that 500GWh of storage for free*, and free is hard to beat economically.

I like the idea of all this 'free' storage but I think you may be out on what would actually be available. Range anxiety is likely to mean that consumers will only lend a small portion of their battery to the grid- cars will not be sitting there with an empty battery just in case you need it. I would guess that 10-25% of the capacity of cars that are plugged in is all there will be to play with.

 5 
 on: Today at 02:44:09 PM 
Started by M - Last post by MeatyFool
If large capacity batteries are going to become the norm and the average motorists then only needs to charge up at home, then we better hope we run out of wind between 7pm and 6am!

Meatyfool..

 6 
 on: Today at 02:43:13 PM 
Started by oliver90owner - Last post by dan_b
The Crown Estate offshore wind farm map gives a breakdown of each farm's current generation in MW, but also as a percentage of it's nameplate capacity.

https://www.thecrownestate.co.uk/energy-minerals-and-infrastructure/offshore-wind-energy/offshore-wind-electricity-map/

At the moment, UK offshore is generating 4.3% of total UK electricity demand. If you zoom in on, let's say, Sheringham Shoal, you'll then see that that particular farm is currently kicking out 154MW, or 48% of its nameplate capacity, from its 88, 3.6MW turbines.   The map even overlays windspeed so you can see the strength and direction too.

 7 
 on: Today at 02:38:59 PM 
Started by M - Last post by dan_b
Grid-scale storage doesn't have to be only about lithium ion batteries though - if we're going that large, we can do more pumped storage too? 

 8 
 on: Today at 02:09:07 PM 
Started by M - Last post by M
With regards to storage, I can't but believe that vehicle to grid tech may provide everything needed. I did some (cigarette pack) figures, which suggested that if we have several million EVs with average batteries of 60kWh, that's an immense amount of spare capacity given that people would only use a fraction of their battery for travel each day.

The articles I've seen and read for the USA, Australia and the UK, all seem to suggest about 12hrs of electrical storage for a near 100% RE grid. There may be some gas burn for back up (ideally bio-gas) and a spill of perhaps 30% from overcapacity.

The UK example suggested 500GWh's of storage in a high leccy future (72GW average) so approx 7hrs of storage needed. And the UK article was by a pro-nuclear bod who I believe shot himself in the foot, as soon after we saw the very low off-shore wind prices coming in all over Europe.

Back to that 500GWh's, if we consider 30m EV's of 50kWh+ each, then we have around 1,500GWh's of potential storage, grid back up. I think, assume, guess, that 1/3 of the fleet may be plugged into smart chargers at any given time giving us that 500GWh of storage for free*, and free is hard to beat economically.

I say free as it comes as a side effect of EV's, so no deliberate CAPEX on the batts, though a fair price to use the batts during peak demand periods will need to be paid, reflected in the price paid for the kWh's. For absorbing excess, I assume simply charging customers a low price to reflect the low leccy price at the time is enough.

 9 
 on: Today at 02:07:20 PM 
Started by Greenbeast - Last post by dan_b
That's one of the reasons this "EV Experience Centre" has been built in Milton Keynes -

youtube.com/watch?v=1s-I4vm9Q78

 10 
 on: Today at 02:06:13 PM 
Started by oliver90owner - Last post by TheFairway
Would be great if energy numbers had % utilisation as well.

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