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 1 
 on: Today at 11:54:11 AM 
Started by brackwell - Last post by renewablejohn
The Scottish research showed that thick walled stone houses where actually far better at retaining heat than originally thought and the main improvements on that type of housing was in respect of windows and draught proofing. Unfortunately this is not reflected in the mythical calculation of EPC in such buildings.

 2 
 on: Today at 11:43:01 AM 
Started by brackwell - Last post by A.L.
hello,


Hiya, can I ask (if it's not too arbitrary) would rough improvement would EWI, DG and GCH give such properties?

Does energy consumption reflect EPC's, for instance our leccy consumption is about 3,000kWh's (import 1,500) and gas is about 8,000kWh, perhaps 1,000kWh of that being DHW and cooking. Is that good, bad, indifferent?*


- been a while since I did this  whistlie

- EWI, unless you are at the bottom of a band you should get a one band improvement

- DG, only a few points, savings over single glazing 5-10%

- GCH from electric instantaneous heating should always be at least one band, possibly two if currently high in a band

Your actual energy consumption plays no part in a EPC rating, your electricity consumption looks average while gas is 2/3 of typical

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/gas/retail-market/monitoring-data-and-statistics/typical-domestic-consumption-values

 3 
 on: Today at 10:51:08 AM 
Started by brackwell - Last post by M
  Old houses without cavity walls, double glazing or central heating were always difficult if not impossible

Hiya, can I ask (if it's not too arbitrary) would rough improvement would EWI, DG and GCH give such properties?

I'm a little shocked reading this thread as I'd always assumed that my 'normal(ish)' 1930's 3 bed semi was a poor starting base, so an A rating with PV seemed easy. For full disclosure the EPC is actually high B, but moves to a low A if I do a few things that had been done but couldn't be confirmed.

Does energy consumption reflect EPC's, for instance our leccy consumption is about 3,000kWh's (import 1,500) and gas is about 8,000kWh, perhaps 1,000kWh of that being DHW and cooking. Is that good, bad, indifferent?*

From a UK average position, not a Navitron base, don't want to get my backside kicked.

 4 
 on: Today at 10:42:52 AM 
Started by brackwell - Last post by Allnightin
Plus, as others and myself have said, EPC's are arbitory - as well as mistakes being common, they are made by an assessor with a very short period of time to make a non invasive test of the property. Often the householder knows whats been done or is around the corner, but the assessor will mark it based on what they see at the time and what they cannnot see, or be proven to them, they will often assume worse case.

I did some time as a DEA producing EPCs for prospective PV installations and explored all the possible options of ways to get the property up to the necessary level (D at the time and that would also include the PV) to claim the higher FiT rate.  Old houses without cavity walls, double glazing or central heating were always difficult if not impossible and in at least a couple of cases it was the size of the PV array that made the difference (I think RDSAP let you put in 18kW )  Raising the bar to level C will rule out considerably more properties.

Bear in mind that the DEA doing the EPC is subject to random monthly audit of those he has done in the preceding month and has to submit photographic evidence of what he is claiming for the property.  The auditor will count the chimneys he can see in the external shots and look for the right number of open fireplaces entered in the data unless there is evidence of dampers or blocked off access.  If there is a mismatch and the effect is more than a small leeway then the EPC will be ruled invalid

 5 
 on: Today at 10:18:38 AM 
Started by Countrypaul - Last post by M
azps, trick question, but are there any lists, examples etc of what different schemes get paid on average for the leccy? I'm wondering if the average wholesale price for PV is higher than the 24hr average as it 'avoids' the nightime lows, or perhaps the opposite as for 6 months of the year it's not selling into the evening peak.

Does that make sense?

I also assume that lots of wind will depress night rates, and lots of PV could depress day rates, but storage and EV's may resolve that.

 6 
 on: Today at 09:42:29 AM 
Started by Charli - Last post by Charli
Aldi have a Sous Vide Wand on Special Buy starting today, 50. I've never tried sous vide cooking but wanted to, with an insulated pot it's low energy cooking! Can't comment on build quality or anything yet!

 7 
 on: Today at 09:29:09 AM 
Started by Countrypaul - Last post by azps
With a  Contract for Difference of say 50/MWh, I can understand that if the market price is only 45/MWh then the producer will be paid an extra 5/MWh based on the contract. If the market price is 50/MWh then the producer will get nothing from the contract.

If the market price is 60/MWh do the contracts provide any revenue back to the government from the higher profit margin, eg. 50% or 5/MwH back to the goverment

Yes, pretty much that - and it's the whole difference, so if the (reference) market price is 60/MWh and the CfD contract strike price is 50/MWh, then the company pays back 10/MWh.

(Strictly speaking, the counterparty isn't the government, it's the Low Carbon Contracts Company (LCCC), but that's a public body anyway)

 8 
 on: Today at 09:28:26 AM 
Started by brackwell - Last post by TheFairway
Fairway,
Thanks,looks like your correct but then i can only suggest people brick them up/take them down to benefit from the EPC or are you not agreeing with that also?  In the calculations a chimney has a ventilation rate of 40 m*3/hr and most old buildings have a few of them!


My issue is with the casual comments on how easy it is to EPC C - it may be for some, but not for all. Your 'if they just blocked up the chimney with a balloon' comment was an example, and I could not believe that it was just this simple, otherwise, they would be marking the EPC dependend on if you closed your curtains at night.

Plus, as others and myself have said, EPC's are arbitory - as well as mistakes being common, they are made by an assessor with a very short period of time to make a non invasive test of the property. Often the householder knows whats been done or is around the corner, but the assessor will mark it based on what they see at the time and what they cannnot see, or be proven to them, they will often assume worse case.

To make a house sale dependent on this is madness. We already live in a sh ite enough world without the nanny state telling us even more what we can and cannot do with our hard earned property. There are many people who cannot afford to make improvements. It will create a social nightmare. Best results come from incentivising (lots of ways to do this, from making more funds available, showing real achievable benefits or even just making things desireable - Teslas incredibably successful approach) people to improve things, and helping them to achieve this rather than going round and bashing them with a stick making their lives a whole lot worse than it may already be in the process.

 9 
 on: Today at 09:05:44 AM 
Started by Countrypaul - Last post by Countrypaul
I'm not sure this is in entirely the right place, but since its primarily concerning wind turbines I'l start it here.

With a  Contract for Difference of say 50/MWh, I can understand that if the market price is only 45/MWh then the producer will be paid an extra 5/MWh based on the contract. If the market price is 50/MWh then the producer will get nothing from the contract.

If the market price is 60/MWh do the contracts provide any revenue back to the goverment from the higher profit margin, eg. 50% or 5/MwH back to the goverment, or just thenormal way all company profits are taxed?

I've tried searching for this online, but since I am not sure what terms to search for I am just getting overloaded with noise.

I am sure that it probably lies in searching through one of the contracts, but thought someone on here might already know and save waded through all the mud.

 10 
 on: Today at 12:50:01 AM 
Started by biff - Last post by dhaslam
 A lot if the problem this time has been roadside trees.  There hasn't been a lot of strong wind recently to  knock them plus this time they still had leaves on.     Locally there was a multiple fatal accident,  about twenty years ago, caused by a falling tree and at the time many of the farmers removed trees near the main  roads  so  there was much less damage this time.    The same needs to be done in other areas especially beech trees that are over 100 years old.   

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