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 1 
 on: Today at 07:24:27 PM 
Started by Barrie - Last post by dan_b
Ionity is the main non-Tesla rapid charging network on mainland Europe though

 2 
 on: Today at 06:52:59 PM 
Started by JohnS - Last post by GeoffM
Mine were installed in Nov 2011, squeezed in just before one of the significant drops in FIT. I've had two periods of inverter outage, one of which was 73 days from 4 Aug 2016 (thus losing some decent revenue!).

I broke even with my latest FIT payment in November, which was a happy moment. I'm now retired so the modest tax free income each year for the next 16 years or thereabouts will be very welcome, especially as I'll be touching 80 then!!

 3 
 on: Today at 06:25:21 PM 
Started by Ricc - Last post by marcus
if you're around 230 then that's about optimal as you've got plenty of headroom for your PV to push it up before hitting shutdown point of the GTI. They aren't going to change taps unless their supply voltage without PV is out of tolerance, but that shouldn't be an issue for you.

What might be an issue if it's a very long run is brown outs caused by you or a neighbour switching on a very big motor and causing a momentary brown out which may cause your GTI to disconnect on undervoltage - but unless that actually happening I wouldn't worry about it.

 4 
 on: Today at 05:57:41 PM 
Started by Barrie - Last post by brackwell
I have a feeling that the 69p rate only applies to 150kw chargers and there are 3 in the country ??

I do not envisage any viable business plan for stand alone public charging.  It will be used as incentive/loss leader to attend businesses  work,supermarkets,hotels,gym .....

 5 
 on: Today at 05:41:04 PM 
Started by whyamisocold - Last post by marcus
You've answered you own question i guess.
For 3years i used a Unisolar 32w (i.e. a good make) thin film panel on an old car battery to run the pig fence. I needed to bring  the battery home once a year around midwinter for a long slow charge overnight, as there wasn't enough sun in west wales to keep it happy, but the rest of the year was fine.

The panel would read 17v even after the sun had dropped below the horizon (max power point around 19v iirc).

 6 
 on: Today at 04:19:53 PM 
Started by paul149 - Last post by nowty
Already announced on another thread, https://www.navitron.org.uk/forum/index.php/topic,31376.0.html

But as the deemed export is only on half the generation I make it total of 57.31p kWh for early adopters.

 7 
 on: Today at 04:06:54 PM 
Started by paul149 - Last post by paul149
If I'm not mistaken then the rise in the FIT rate for Apr 2020 onwards is going to be 2.2%
So correct me if I'm wrong but I make it (inc Export) now 59.26p per kWh (for early adopters!)
Paul m.

 8 
 on: Today at 03:10:59 PM 
Started by whyamisocold - Last post by whyamisocold
Likely nothing wrong with the panel.

Just done some more empirical testing.  These panels epitomise C3. One panel consistently gives out 12.4 or so volts with about 2000 lux.  The other two panels cant make up their minds.  Sometimes 12v or so but as of now...around 7v each.

But that's not it.  Connect them each in turn to a resistive 80 ohm load.  Voltage from the panels drops to under 1v.   As I said, prime example of C3.

 9 
 on: Today at 02:32:19 PM 
Started by todthedog - Last post by RIT

We will most likely need green H2 to substitute much of which we presently get from gas and substitute steel making and ...   leaving no capacity for time-shifting leccy I would suggest.


Once TOU tariffs are common, time-shifting should become very common as the generators of the electricity will always be chasing the highest possible return. This is one of the long term problems for Hydrogen generation as a natural gas replacement. Any plant will need to operate 24x7 to justify its capital cost, but it also needs access to electricity at a price that is currently visible via the Octopus tariff for just a few hours a month. I think it will be a while before we have 30-40GW of wind capacity that can operate at around 2p per kWh and even as and when we do the first thing that will happen is that all our interconnects will just switch direction to feed Europe.

 10 
 on: Today at 02:24:18 PM 
Started by Zarch - Last post by Zarch
Just added a new graph to the site on each of the 14 regional "Go versus Agile" pages.

This new one is Go versus Agile (00:30 to 04:30) for the previous year, but shows Agile as a weekly average.

For example: https://www.energy-stats.uk/octopus-go-versus-agile-london/

Hope this helps.


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