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 1 
 on: Today at 02:23:45 PM 
Started by stannn - Last post by Ted
Youíve overlooked one obvious problem, guys. 

What happens to V2G, where energy is exported to the grid at peak periods?  Seems to be just the same scenario, except maybe at the whim of the grid rather than for the benefit of most domestic users of PV systems.

Would that then accelerate battery storage and make domestic PV systems look like V2G? - But at the cost of the individual?  I would likely reduce my PV output rather than feed the grid with any excess for no return whatsoever.  Variable inverters which only match the incoming voltage might catch on?

RAB

Having no mandated export payment system via a FiTs scheme will not necessarily prevent suppliers from entering in to similar contracts with PV homeowners. It may end up depending on the exact re-wording of the regulations. It would almost certainly need to be metered.

 2 
 on: Today at 02:17:32 PM 
Started by paul149 - Last post by Antman
As I see it, the only real benefactors are government agencies (looking out for cannabis plant growers), the leccy suppliers (who can increase tariffs with the excuse of reducing usage at certain times) and those that are not clever enough to turn off appliances when not needed (the dumb end of the population).

Just another case of Ďbig brotherí looking over our shoulder.  I donít think a smart meter would save me tuppence - my wife would not take any notice of what we were using any more than she does now!

I agree completely. If you have left the bathroom light on then surely it's obvious and you don't need a 'Smart meter' to tell you that there is an extra 7W load switched on - as if you can identify that as distinct from whether the fridge or freezer (or both) are running. Even something as simple as the house alarm in 'Home set' or 'deactivated' mode will alter power consumption - albeit by a small amount. All this brainwashing from newspaper adverts from people who claim the SM has saved them a fortune is just bunkum (difficult to not invoke the Forum swear filter there) since plain common sense would achieve the same thing - if it really is true and not just a case of "We'll pay you £x,000 to appear in the advert, just say this...".

Let's not forget that the remote monitor for the SM requires a plug-in PSU or charger that probably is left to run 24-7 - the equivalent of leaving the mobile charger on when not needed - something energy savers tell us not to do. So kind of self-defeating I feel!

And given they don't work with solar PV what's the point for me? The ability to manage power consumption to maximise PV usage is essential and far more use than knowing what the instantaneous consumption is - something that my Sunny Beam and free Electrisave together do very well ta very much.

The real truth is what they are failing to tell you. When (not if) the country becomes defficient in its capability to supply the country of energy there needs to be a way to prevent the grid from collapsing and potentially plunging vast areas if not the entire country into blackouts.
That my friends is where the Smart Meter comes in - the remotely controllable contactor contained within it that allows your energy supplier to isolate your supply without notice and will allow then to selectively kill grid loads in a given street/town/County - because YOU are giving them all the data they need about how and when you use your energy.

Let's have the real truth please. No manufacturer puts expensive components or features into a device if they don't expect to use them, as it costs money; which when multiplied by millions of devices costs huge sums for a 'wasted component option' cost. So don't let them hoodwink you by claiming "It's built-in by the manufacturer - but we don't intend to use it". Oh no? Of course not...  flyingpig

Antman

 3 
 on: Today at 11:58:06 AM 
Started by stannn - Last post by dimengineer
Does the equation change if a whole housing estate goes up with a few kW per house on the roof?
Say you had 500 new houses, each with 2kW. That's 1MWp. In midsummer that'd be well over 500kW going back into the grid in that one location? Does that cause problems, or does the new estate need a stronger grid.

How is that any worse than every household putting the kettle on at the same time?

I guess there's 2 differences
1) The energy is going back into the grid. And it has to go somewhere.
2) Not everyone puts their kettle on a the same time. You can safely assume a lot of diversity. But with solar you can't. In fact you really have to assume that if its sunny, all th ehouses will be generating

It may well be that 1kW per house isn't a problem at all. I dont know, which is why I was asking.

 4 
 on: Today at 11:39:52 AM 
Started by paul149 - Last post by todthedog
The French created a big fuss over the ability of smart meters to spy using your individual power usage.
Agree with Guy can't see how this will save me electricity,  of much more interest to government agencies.

 5 
 on: Today at 11:24:24 AM 
Started by stannn - Last post by oliver90owner
Youíve overlooked one obvious problem, guys. 

What happens to V2G, where energy is exported to the grid at peak periods?  Seems to be just the same scenario, except maybe at the whim of the grid rather than for the benefit of most domestic users of PV systems.

Would that then accelerate battery storage and make domestic PV systems look like V2G? - But at the cost of the individual?  I would likely reduce my PV output rather than feed the grid with any excess for no return whatsoever.  Variable inverters which only match the incoming voltage might catch on?

RAB

 6 
 on: Today at 11:12:01 AM 
Started by sam_cat - Last post by Tinbum
It seems all my data is now on the portal so looks like their problem not mine. Grin

 7 
 on: Today at 11:08:39 AM 
Started by pantsmachine - Last post by nowty
If your getting batteries you may want to consider changing your energy supplier to EBICO with a zero standing charge. As your import goes towards zero, the standing charge really makes a difference.

I am actually with Scottish Power at the moment but again with zero standing charge but the tariff its only available to people who are already with Scottish Power.

My daily import is circa 0.1 kWh at the moment, it used to be 15 kWhs during the summer before all this renewable madness. wackoold


 8 
 on: Today at 11:02:18 AM 
Started by stannn - Last post by RIT
Does the equation change if a whole housing estate goes up with a few kW per house on the roof?
Say you had 500 new houses, each with 2kW. That's 1MWp. In midsummer that'd be well over 500kW going back into the grid in that one location? Does that cause problems, or does the new estate need a stronger grid.

How is that any worse than every household putting the kettle on at the same time?

The problem/complication comes from the way the grid works. Distributing electricity out to end consumers involves a process of dropping the voltage at each transformer from a higher voltage to a lower voltage until the correct 216V to 253V range is provided. At some point, this range may even legally increase to 207V to 253V, but that is more an EU fudge to claim 'harmonisation' of power standards across the EU.

Large amounts of PV complicates the system as the historic focus has been on deploying 'step-down' transformers as there was never a need for local 'step-up' transformers. This is complicated even more by the way in which power generation works - to provide power into a system the generator must provide it's power at a voltage that is greater than the network's current voltage. So a housing estate with large-scale PV, that is connected to the grid via a single transformer and able to produce more energy than the estate needs must push its excess power back to the grid by raising its voltage (up to the max allowed). This means that demand 'swings' could also become an issue as on a sunny day all the inverters in an area reach their maximum output voltage and then shut down.

Another major problem for the grid operators is that currently, it is easy to model the flow of electricity across the low voltage network as all the energy comes from the high voltage network. With large-scale local PV this modelling becomes a problem as there are far more generation points, all of which are far more dynamic.

None of the issues are unsolvable, its just that there would be a major upgrade to the grid, which would have a major cost and cause a lot of disruption as cables are added or upgraded.

 9 
 on: Today at 10:49:15 AM 
Started by paul149 - Last post by myozone
The biggest problem with smarts meters is the firmware can be changed 'over the air' to read active power - which includes the power factor, therefore, having a bigger bill. France is having issues with the new Linky meters reading KVA instead of KW.

Dave.

Just found this explains the France issue

https://youtu.be/XCtYNNDslJk?t=2m20s

 10 
 on: Today at 08:57:09 AM 
Started by paul149 - Last post by Westie
A friend of mine moved to a house ready fitted with a smart meter. He shopped around for a cheaper deal and was very surprised to be asked for a meter reading. He was told  the meter was supplier specific and could only be read at a distance by the original supplier.  An early model?  If so how many already supplied will need to be updated?

Yes, a 'dumb' smart meter. But AFAIK the 'dumbs' will be integrated into the DCC network by September this year so then remote reading will be possible for any supplier via the national network.  Odds on the deadline slipping back again are quite high I suspect.....

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