navitron
 
Renewable Energy and Sustainability Forum
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Anyone wishing to register as a new member on the forum is strongly recommended to use a "proper" email address - following recent spam/hack attempts on the forum, all security is set to "high", and "disposable" email addresses like Gmail, Yahoo and Hotmail tend to be viewed with suspicion, and the application rejected if there is any doubt whatsoever
 
Recent Articles: Navitron Partners With Solax to Help Create A More Sustainable Future | Navitron Calls for Increased Carbon Footprint Reduction In Light of Earth Overshoot Day | A plea from The David School - Issue 18
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Where to put the electricity supply?  (Read 1901 times)
aa44
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 16


« on: July 24, 2010, 05:57:55 PM »

I am about to build a new house and our planning approval includes permission for a small wind turbine.  I have not yet decided how this will be connected, i.e. whether it will be grid connected, connected to a battery bank or to an immersion heater.

My question is how to arrange the electrical set-up in the house to accommodate this.  The utility company electricity supply will come into the garage (approx 8 metres long) and the meters will be mounted on a board inside the garage.  (We are in Shetland and they don't use external meter cupboards here).  The supply cable will come under the drive into a "hockey stick" which will come up next to the wall so that the cables can be fed into the utility company fuse.  The house is attached to the south end of the garage so it would make sense to put the consumer unit at the south end. 

The wind turbine will be north of the garage so the cables from the turbine will enter through the north wall.  Given that I don't know how I am going to connect the turbine yet is my best bet to fit another hockey stick that will enter just inside the north wall?  I don't know what the cable size will be yet so should I put in two hockey sticks at this end?  (I think that the normal diameter for the hockey stick is 38mm).

Am I better off having the meter at the north end near where the wind turbine connection will come in or at the south end near the consumer unit?  Unfortunately I need to decide now as the hockey stick and ducting will need to go through the concrete foundations.  Putting the meter at the north end means putting in an extra isolator switch for the supply to the consumer unit but presumably means shorter distances for whatever we do the the wind turbine.

Anybody got any suggestions?
Logged
daftlad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1732



« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2010, 06:21:04 PM »

I got slightly lost with your layouts but you are best keeping everything in one spot. There is no reason why the ducts can't come up on an interior wall or run under the garage floor, so long as you remember to put them in before you start building.
If I could avoid fused isolators I always would, just more money.
ta ta
Logged

I WILL KEEP BANGING ON ABOUT MASONRY STOVES
Ted
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3906



« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2010, 07:55:48 PM »

It's generally normal to have the consumer unit within 1m of the utility fuse.

Cable from a decent sized domestic wind turbine would normally be SWA 3-core and 16mm2 conductor size of this (big enough to minimise volt drop over a couple of hundred metres) will easily go through a 38mm diameter hole but is tricky stuff to get around tight bends.
Logged

Volunteer moderator
aa44
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 16


« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2010, 09:46:01 PM »

Thanks guys.  That tells me all I need to know!
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!