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Author Topic: Is this renewable energy concept feasible?  (Read 1957 times)
Charlie10
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« on: November 07, 2010, 04:22:51 PM »

I've recently got into the idea of renewable energy and i'm exploring what opportunities there are. One idea i've come up with is using mirrors to focus the suns heat onto a section of the sea, this heat would be so intense that the seat water would evaporate off to form steam and this can then (smiler to how it happens with nuclear power) turn turbines and then in turn turn a generator to produce electricity.

This is just an idea, and i'm not sure if its been done before but is it a feasible concept?

Thanks

Charlie
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martin
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« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2010, 04:29:48 PM »

Yes and no! It's already being done in Spain, large field of mirrors reflects and "concentrates" sun to tower, where steam is made to turn generators  - little point in doing it at sea as loads of mirrors all have to be pointed at a very specific point (bit difficult on a jiggly sea)  - and no point heating the sea, as the heat would dissipate too fast, which would be a waste! Smiley


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« Last Edit: November 07, 2010, 04:32:12 PM by martin » Logged

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Charlie10
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« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2010, 05:04:25 PM »

thanks, i found this company http://www.stirlingenergy.com/ who seem to be doing a smiler thing. Are these protected ideas by patent or IP? Or could these be replicated for the UK?

With my idea the sea water would be continuously pumped to an enclosed area so the heat could be focussed and get maximum effect.
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martin
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« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2010, 05:15:50 PM »

Why sea water? No idea about patents, but there is one teensie drawback to all schemes of this type in the UK - lack of sun! Grin
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dhaslam
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« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2010, 06:52:44 PM »

There are proposals  to use  the difference between  surface and deep underwater  temperatures  of the oceans  to  operate stirling engines linked to generators.   Since there is already quite a big temperature difference, going down 1000 metres,  and the volume is so great  that    there may not be much to gain by heating the surface water more  but it might help.    Stirling engines are not very  productive  but on a very large scale they might  become practical.   


www.windows2universe.org/earth/Water/temp.html
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« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2010, 07:15:28 PM »

Charlie

Using mirrors to concentrate the intensity of sunlight onto heat collector pipes and raising steam, if moved into the desert regions, is THE most viable way of providing renewable power, using sea water as coolant results in the added bonus of desalination and producing potable water.

This technology is mature already and only needs the political will to get it going..........................dont hold your breath then faint

Desperate
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