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Author Topic: Planning Consent - Full documentation to baffle the PO with science  (Read 4527 times)
AIRFORCE-1
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« on: March 22, 2007, 08:28:16 AM »

Hi

Im interested in hearing from anyone who has submitted a planning concent application and has bulked up this with loads of information on topics such as Noise, Enviromental Impact, Overcoming difficult neighbours, a complete document that covers all eventuallities.  Is it worth quoting addresses of existing installations in your area that have been through there office to establish that the president has been set?

I am in North Devon and the planning dept here (Torridge) are asking for the name of the electrical installer who needs to be NICEIC registered.  There are other registered bodies that are accepted but this is the one I took note of.  Without this you need Building Regs as well. 

The one thing they are good at here is throwing back your application a few days before the 8 week limit is reached with a mickey mouse request which enables them to start the 8 week clock again and this is my reason for wanting to hit them with as much information as possible from the start so if there is anyone out there been through this procedure I would be grateful for as much info as possible.

Has anyone been forced to take a turbine down by the council as they haven't got Planning.  I would think this would be really bad PR especially if the system fell within an established president of an existing WT of say, <10m tower, >50m from neighbour, <6kw.  The newspapers would have a field day as having read loads of topics on this forum, the legislation looks as though it has been put to paper and just needs to go through the system.

Regards

Airforce-1
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Ted
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« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2007, 10:08:09 AM »

Are you inside the boundaries of Exmoor National Park?
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AIRFORCE-1
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« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2007, 11:03:50 AM »

No just out in the countryside with farming all around.  Definitely not a conservation area.

Thanks
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Ted
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« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2007, 10:22:23 AM »

OK. I don't have a prepared template but my advice is this.

1. Research the planning framework documents for your area;
   - there should be a Local Plan accessible to you
   - it should include a statement that is broadly supportive of small scale renewables.
   - check the Renewable Energy Action Plan (REAP) for your area (see http://www.northdevon.gov.uk/index/lgcl_environment/nonlgcl_reap.htm )

2. Reference the overall PPS22 guidelines for England. (see http://www.communities.gov.uk/index.asp?id=1143908 )

3. Obtain the details from the manufacturer/supplier covering any noise issues.

4. If visual impact is likely to be an issue then take photos from different vantage points, explore different locations for the mast (even moving it a few feet can sometimes make a big difference to the visual impact).

5. Talk to your neighbours who are likely to be affected. Try to get their support.

Include all of the above in your application covering letter to let the planners know what you have done to mitigate any possible objections.
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titan
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« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2007, 11:19:41 AM »

Play them at their own game. If you are just surrounded by fields and no neighbours to consider and there are no reasonable reasons why they should reject your application just go ahead and apply retrospectively.  The worst that will happen is that you will get an enforcement notice to remove it, that's assuming they win at appeal and most planning authorities don,t defend cases at appeal and planners are under pressure to approve eco projects  This is not a recommendation but is an option. As for part P stick  to the rules, do they apply, well I would think yes for a grid connect.

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Roger Willott
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« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2007, 01:39:00 PM »

I agree with the last contributor. I have a 5kw from Navitron which will be erected without seeking planning permission. Permission may not be needed by then as the Climate Change and Sustainable Energy Act 2006 was intended to have small scale micro generation as permitted development. Implementing these things seems to take forever.......................
Roger Willott
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stephen
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« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2007, 04:09:33 PM »

I have dealt with the Planning office on several occasions. Through my experience open up a dialog with your PO with your proposals and do your homework.
If I had just followed the planning route for my Boiler it would have cost about £6000 to put through. Through due diligence and persistence (and eventually knowing more than my planners) they conceded to supply me with a letter stating that planning permission was not necessary.
They are friendly people and donít profess to know everything.  Offer to provide background reading for them if required.  If you cross them though you may be in for a good ride.

Have a look at the considerate constructors page on the www. Although not completely relevant there is more than enough info there to help keep your neighbours and local council happy.

If people are ignorant to something they then to oppose it.

Good luck.
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snozzer
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« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2007, 12:22:15 PM »

I am in North Devon and the planning dept here (Torridge) are asking for the name of the electrical installer who needs to be NICEIC registered.  There are other registered bodies that are accepted but this is the one I took note of.  Without this you need Building Regs as well. 
Airforce-1

The electric contractor has nothing to do with planning, thats building control, totally different.  Planning lets you build, building control let you know if the technical method you are proposing is acceptable.

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Roger Willott
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« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2007, 10:25:27 PM »

Below is a copy of an email which is self explanatory and received by me on the 12th October 2006. It may be helpful. I will email today and see what more has happened. The last paragraph says that building regs are not applicable. Roger Willott

Dear Mr Willott
 
Thank you for your e-mail enquiring about steps being taken to facilitate the use of microgeneration in dwellings.
 
The Government is clear that microgeneration can play an important role in helping to meet the energy needs of the country and reduce carbon emissions. Scope for the relaxation of planning permission for the installation microgeneration systems is part of a wider review of permissions for householder development that is being undertaken.   
 
It is important that in the event of a relaxation, robust arrangements are in place so that the interests of neighbours and the wider community are sufficiently protected.
 
We will be publishing a full consultation on the detailed proposals for taking forward these recommendations in the next few months. Details of the consultation will be published on the DCLG website.
 
Currently Building Regulations set no standards for compliance for micro-generation systems and there are no plans to introduce such standards in the foreseeable future.
 
Yours sincerely
 
 
Christine Ogden
 
 
Christine Ogden
Climate Change Strategy Coordinator
Buildings Division
4/B5
Eland House
Bressenden Place
London
SW1
Tel: 020 7944 5677
GTN: 3533 5677
E-mail: christine.ogden@communities.gsi.gov.uk
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Nothing in this E-mail message amounts to a contractual or other legal commitment on the part of the Government unless confirmed by a communication signed on behalf of the Secretary of State.
 
The Department's computer systems may be monitored and communications carried on them recorded, to secure the effective operation of the system and for other lawful purposes.
 
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nicnaim
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« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2007, 07:16:46 PM »

Not sure if this has already been posted, been a bit busy.  For info the size of turbines that will be allowed as permitted development will be limited to a maximum rotor diameter of 2.0m, which means that everything else will still need full planning permission.  Details via the link attached.

Regards

Nic

http://www.communities.gov.uk/pub/367/ChangestoPermittedDevelopmentConsultationPaper1PermittedDevelopmentRightsforHoun_id1509367.pdf
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