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Author Topic: travelling with vacuum solar tubes  (Read 8130 times)
rutherford
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« on: December 26, 2010, 02:03:05 PM »

Hi - wondered if anyone has any experience of transporting a vacuum tube on a plane?

If it is small enough would it in theory be allowed on a flight and would the pressure changes in a flight be a threat?
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Ivan
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« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2010, 12:19:47 AM »

If the atmospheric pressure reduces, it will make it less of a differential pressure across the glass rather than more - so it will cause no problem. I wouldn't be so sure about transporting them on a submarine though!

Yes, I did transport some by plane a very long time ago. Had to tell them to be very careful with them, and handed it into the oversize baggage section. Didn't have any problems, but they were packed quite carefully, and I wouldn't like to guarantee success, as I only ever did it once
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rutherford
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« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2010, 02:51:58 PM »

cheers.  Am I right in thinking I should be allowed to take it onboard as hand luggage (provided size is fine) in the UK?
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dhaslam
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« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2010, 02:56:40 PM »

It should be OK if the security people have a day off.   
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DHW 250 litre cylinder  60 X 47mm tubes
Heating  180,000 litre straw insulated seasonal store, 90X58mm tubes + 7 sqm flat collectors, 1 kW VAWT, 3 kW heatpump plus Walltherm gasifying stove
rutherford
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« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2010, 05:17:54 PM »

er, source?
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dhaslam
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« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2010, 07:29:51 PM »

Any airline check list, for example the one below.     

Flammable liquids and containers under pressure such as aerosols

http://www.christinecolumbus.com/airsecurity.asp

I suppose a container with negative pressure is different but then who is to say what is inside, potentially it could be quite a lethal weapon. 

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DHW 250 litre cylinder  60 X 47mm tubes
Heating  180,000 litre straw insulated seasonal store, 90X58mm tubes + 7 sqm flat collectors, 1 kW VAWT, 3 kW heatpump plus Walltherm gasifying stove
rutherford
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« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2010, 08:41:39 PM »

hmm. well technically it's not illegal. And the glass itself is surely the most dangerous part anyway so if it's allowed...
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Ivan
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« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2010, 09:19:09 PM »

I doubt you'd be allowed to take glass onto an aeroplane. Smash it, and you have a large number of razor-sharp daggers.
They even confiscated my marmite (Squeezy plastic container) when I went on a flight with my daughter (for her sandwiches) because it could be used as a lethal weapon
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rutherford
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« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2010, 10:36:25 PM »

thousands of glass bottles are taken onboard UK flights each week.
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micko
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« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2011, 07:05:55 PM »

I doubt you'd be allowed to take glass onto an aeroplane. Smash it, and you have a large number of razor-sharp daggers.
They even confiscated my marmite (Squeezy plastic container) when I went on a flight with my daughter (for her sandwiches) because it could be used as a lethal weapon

Is that because it is classed as a poison ?
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Ivan
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« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2011, 02:24:13 AM »

I guess if the pilot was a 'hate it' type, I could have hijacked the plane by forcing him to eat some.

Good point. If you can take your duty-free on board (Can you still do this?), where's the point of banning nailclippers (I was travelling with a lady who had her nailclippers and tweezers confiscated from her makeup bag), when you can take a bottle and smash it on the plane. Most of the anti-terrorism rules are to make passengers feel safe, rather than to make them safe.
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wyleu
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« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2011, 06:40:23 AM »

Submarine solar tubes.......





..... hmmmm
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MR GUS
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« Reply #12 on: February 25, 2011, 01:52:01 PM »

I doubt you'd be allowed to take glass onto an aeroplane. Smash it, and you have a large number of razor-sharp daggers.
They even confiscated my marmite (Squeezy plastic container) when I went on a flight with my daughter (for her sandwiches) because it could be used as a lethal weapon

Yup! when travelling my marmite go's in my snowboard boots in the hold (squeezy marmite, pah! ..young-uns & their newfangled ways)
Theres no getting away from airport "security" these days, if you want anything for in the cabin either dispense it & keep it in a small container as part of your allowance, & in terms of cutlery for your youngster,..(how old now)Huh
we take sporks, as they're plastic they're allowed as cutlery & a damn sight easier to use than flight issue cutlery (gives you more room to eat when everyones tables are down, plus they now do a bambino version minus serrations, as a pack of 3 (if I recall correctly).
Izzy has had to make do with the regular adult version, we have 6+ sporks as she uses them most days.


If you need to spread stuff properly (sporks are no good for spreading at all but excel elsewhere) then I'd recommend the "microbites" set complete with carbon offsetting in the purchase price, between sporks & the microbites we are well & truly sorted.
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