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Author Topic: Brideshead Heat Pump  (Read 2091 times)
grevls
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Upsetting the Apple Kart since 1986


« on: February 07, 2011, 12:17:45 PM »

An interesting article (even if it is from the Daily Mail)

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1353926/Brideshead-replumbed-How-owners-historic-home-halved-heating--bit-piping-anti-freeze.html#ixzz1DH0T1Vf2
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Bon Appetite and, err, Salvador Dali!
baker
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« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2011, 11:40:41 PM »

Hi
 is geothermal heating really the best option for the UK
 what you see today is old technology
 john
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knighty
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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2011, 11:55:27 PM »

was that a finished picture of the coils in the lake ?   why were they coiled up like that ?  I can only assume they spread them out later on... unless I'm missing something ?

also.... 80k a year to 14k a year ?

he must have done more than just install the heat pumps ?
(assuming all heating must be electric)

with old fashioned radiators the heat pumps can't be that efficient can they ?


I thought a COP of 4 is pretty good, and that's with under floor heating ?

a cop of 4 would only take them from 80k a year to 20k a year ?
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billt
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« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2011, 08:23:54 AM »

The lake was drained for the installation, so I'd guess that that picture was taken after the coils had been dumped roughly in position but not laid out.

The article implies that the temperature was reduced, which could account for a lot of the saving. Some of the house isn't heated, although that probably isn't a change. With good outside temperature sensing control the water temp in the radiators will be low most of the time. My flow temp to radiators is about 33C at the moment, so well within the range at which you could expect a good COP.
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dhaslam
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« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2011, 12:29:40 PM »

They have a  fountain fed from an  upper lake.   It obviously has to work  during summer opening times for visitors  but in winter it  probably could generate a lot of the electricity needed for the heat pumps.       It is interesting that even the Daily  Mail readers  seem to begrudge a 60,000  grant for the job  but these  visitor attractions have   a very big effect on the local economy, probably a million or more  each year tourist revenue in the area.   

www.castlehoward.co.uk/DB/Latest-News/Atlas-Fountain-Restoration.html
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DHW 250 litre cylinder  60 X 47mm tubes
Heating  180,000 litre straw insulated seasonal store, 90X58mm tubes + 7 sqm flat collectors, 1 kW VAWT, 3 kW heatpump plus Walltherm gasifying stove
Baz
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« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2011, 01:35:29 PM »

The 80k was testimate for what oil would be now, while the last actual was 65k. He must have a farm and cows so the next subsidy should be for a biogas plant and CHP to provide teh leccy for the pumps. BTW he is producing 70C for the rads, so 2 stage or less effcient single stage do you think?
Glad to see they point out 60C is a perfectly adequate sitting room temp.
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dhaslam
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« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2011, 02:54:01 PM »

Glad to see they point out 60C is a perfectly adequate sitting room temp.

Centigrade  is much too new fangled for a house like that,   proper farenheit degrees.   

I remember the  project manager  on the telescope and science centre here  telling me that  at her first  meeting in the castle  that everyone  around the table looked frozen except for the family  who were used to living in  low temperatures.  To them 60F would be fine.
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DHW 250 litre cylinder  60 X 47mm tubes
Heating  180,000 litre straw insulated seasonal store, 90X58mm tubes + 7 sqm flat collectors, 1 kW VAWT, 3 kW heatpump plus Walltherm gasifying stove
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