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Author Topic: Astro Photos  (Read 3694 times)
desperate
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« on: January 04, 2011, 07:06:14 PM »

Brilliant, thanks guys/Ivan.

Having been interested in astronomy since being an ankle biter, over the years I have accumulated quite a lot of gear for astrophotography, trouble is it takes quite a while to set up in the garden, not having a permanent observatory, and then to cool to ambient temps. It wouldn't be so bad if one knew say at 4pm that it would stay clear for at least a few hours after dark, but the weather is rarely so cooperative. Add in the difficulty of avoiding full moon, days when one has to get up too early for a night under the stars, and it seems to leave very few occasions when a "good night" is convenient.

So, to make things easy I have taken to setting up the camera with a standard 35mm lens wide open, with an ISO setting of 800-1600, and holding the shutter open for 10 to 20 seconds, this gives a nice field wide enough for maybe a couple of constellations and if the sky is clean it can reach down to 10th magnitude. Best of all one can make use of a 30 minute gap in the clouds Grin

Give it a try and post up a few piccys, I will dig up some images later.


Ho ho ho, things are looking up....................... faint


Desperate
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murraymint
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« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2011, 08:27:36 PM »

Not quite Astro but still up in the sky. This shot was from my back door, the camera was tripod mounted, manual shutter operation and f5, just close the shutter when you see the flash.


* lighting.jpg (30.58 KB, 640x427 - viewed 379 times.)
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desperate
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« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2011, 08:31:57 PM »

That is gorgeous, I could stare at it for quite a while, better even than Billys twister.

Desp
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desperate
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« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2011, 09:02:56 PM »

A couple of pics here, taken with Canon 450, 28 -50 zoom lens working at 28, 30 sec exp and ISO 1600, from the isle of wight.

Desp


* IMG_2516.JPG (29.35 KB, 1000x666 - viewed 367 times.)

* IMG_2518.JPG (34.16 KB, 1000x666 - viewed 376 times.)
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desperate
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« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2011, 09:10:37 PM »

Bottom pic is looking into Cygnus with Lyra to the top right, Vega and Deneb are quite prominent and Altair would be just out of sight at the bottom right corner.

Anyone care to suss the top piccy?

Desp
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dhaslam
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« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2011, 09:13:46 PM »

Most photographers just  photograph the moon.   It is amazing  how sharp photographs taken in very dry areas  can be compared to the  results we get in our moist air conditions. 

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Ivan
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« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2011, 03:55:01 PM »

Gemini ?
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desperate
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« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2011, 04:53:44 PM »

It's Pegasus, tipped at 45 degrees in the center bottom half, with reddish Scheat, Matar and Sad al Bari forming the triangle just to the right of centre, looking to the lower left you can see Andromeda with the chain of Mirach, Mu and Nu leading the way to M31, not a bad view from Rattly, our old caravan Grin

Desp
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StBarnabas
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« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2011, 07:38:03 PM »

Desp
the bottom one is very obvious - I spotted Lyra instantly. I initially thought Gemini as well but it didn't look right but not sure if I would have gotten Pegasus.
Sean
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Ivan
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« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2011, 12:30:20 AM »

I find it really difficult to see constellations on star maps and photos - because you cannot see the relative brightnesses easily.

Incidentally, has anyone tried photographing the space station (ISS)? I've tried a few times unsuccessfully, having seen some amateur photos where they've simply selected a high 'ASA' setting on their digital camera zoomed in and manually tracked the ISS during a quick exposure. The photos on the internet are very impressive, but mine was a blurry streak
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murraymint
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« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2011, 07:24:27 AM »

To get any good results you will need a tracking mount, I can fix my camera to the telescope and use the built in auto tracking device. I've not tried the ISS but will give it a go as soon as I get some clear sky's.
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Ivan
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« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2011, 11:57:35 PM »

I'll start a new thread...
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