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Author Topic: Aurora Alert  (Read 17240 times)
desperate
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« on: February 17, 2011, 06:34:48 PM »

As you are probably aware by now the Sun has glopped out what the scientists call a Coronal Mass Ejection, in other words a bunch of ionized gas, or plasma. This stuff  wafts along with the Solar Wind and will generally travel at up to a few million miles an hour, but may be quite a bit slower. It may result in some Auroral activity over the next few nights, so if you have a clear sky check out whats happening looking generally to the north. Some quite pleasing images can be grabbed with a 30 second or so exposure with a wide open shortish focal length lens, ISO of say 800.

The further north you are the better chance you have of seeing something.

Good luck.

Desperate
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Amy
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« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2011, 06:37:48 PM »

I thought the speed of light was the fastest thing known to science?

A few million miles per hour is rather a lot more dont you think?
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desperate
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« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2011, 06:43:38 PM »

Amy,

No, the speed of light is 186,000 miles a second, so much faster than this.


Desp
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« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2011, 08:31:32 PM »

Actually, diorhea is the fastest thing known to science

Magnus was holding auditions for the final of master mind and there were 4 contestants. To make it fair he decides to ask them all the same question so see who can go into the final

First one goes in and he says, whats the fastest thing in the world.

A thought.

Great answer, im sure thts a winner, send the next one in.
He asks the next, whats the fastest thing in the world.

A blink.

Of course it is, im sure your going to the final, send the next in.
Whats the fastest thing in the world?

Light.


Thats brilliant, of course it is, your deffinately going to win, send the last one in.

Paddy, whats the fastest thing in the world?

Ahhh, thats easy sir, its diorhea.
Paddy, ive had some realy great answers so far but nothing like yours, can you explain please.

Well sir, I went out for a curry the other night and when i got home to my front door I was bursting for the bog and couldnt find my keys, then before I could think, blink or put on the light I had shyte myself   extrahappy
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desperate
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« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2011, 08:39:12 PM »

Aint known as "back door gallops" for nawt faint

Desp
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Alan
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« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2011, 07:28:29 AM »

The 1970 version was not as refined.

It was one of the.
An English man.
Irish man.
Scott’s man
and Welsh man variety.
 
But the end result was the same extrahappy

Regards

Alan
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Ivan
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« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2011, 01:14:56 AM »

Anyone seen an aurora? I've always wanted to see them, since I watched 'The Snowman' as a youngster (which has the most fantastic cartoon aurora). I've seen plenty of pictures, but missed the Southern UK opportunity that arose during the mid90s(?) due to overcast conditions. Let me know if anyone sees them in the UK!
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EccentricAnomaly
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« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2011, 09:55:06 AM »

No luck here. Comment on Paul at the end of the road's blog and similar on Wycombe Astronomical Society forum with link to useful Aurora Watch site.

New Aurora Watch twitter feed: @aurorawatchuk.  It had 46 followers when I found it the other day, now over 2000.

Cloudy here now with not much prospect of a break.

Though it's probably mostly climate confusionist nonsense I do have a slight sympathy for the idea that cosmic rays seed clouds: most times there's much chance of an aurora it seems to be cloudy.  facepalm
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desperate
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« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2011, 12:48:51 PM »

I read somewhere that statistically Anticyclones seem to be a little more intense and longer lived during periods of high activity, but the effect was too small to be really noticeable on the ground.

 I did see the Aurora in 1999? even from the light polluted sky in SW London, it was a quite obvious reddish glow to the north and northwest horizon extending to maybe 35-40 degrees altitude, it was accompanied by 2 whitish streaks from the northwest to almost overhead, at first I thought it was a vapour trail, but it was quite clearly moving back and forth. The whole show lasted more than an hour and a half.

Sadly it was before I had a digital camera, I did rattle off several shots on some gas hypered Kodak elite (remember that?) but it just looked like a load of street light pollution Cry

Still keep looking up, the equinox is the most likely time of year for an auroral show.

Desperate
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Stuart
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« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2011, 10:10:46 AM »

always in my tabs http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/pmap/

seen a great display a twice up here, once on walk home from the pub. Was more white and red so not seen green yet. planning a Orkney Holiday next solar maximum.

Even herd a welsh amateur calling CQA on 2M, though not worked anyone via Aurora yet
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EccentricAnomaly
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« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2011, 12:07:39 AM »

Seen some.
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camillitech
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« Reply #11 on: March 02, 2011, 06:52:53 AM »

Morning Ed,

nice picture, funnily enough when I arose the morning at 5:00am the sky was a wild but subdued pink over to the east, not the aurora or the sun at that time of day but lovely nonetheless.

Cheers, Paul
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« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2011, 09:18:27 PM »

Ivan, seen a few of them in my time up past Iceland,
See em in planes often (though weak) when flying to & fro to Canada, nice to have shared that with Izzy.
One time in the 80's it was a strong night for the sky in general inc Aurora, I walked into the sea, into ditches & off a bridge that night! sometimes it can be amazing in Northern scotland, proving you don't need to go far more get lucky!
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desperate
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Backache stuff!!


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« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2012, 06:26:08 PM »

Conjunction alert.

If you have a clear sky this evening Sat 25/2/12 there is a nice crescent moon with Venus a couple of degrees south and Jupiter about 10 degrees East, good photo opportunity.

Desp

PS didn't seem worth starting a new thread.
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« Reply #14 on: February 25, 2012, 07:12:43 PM »



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