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Author Topic: Well insulated slow cooker?  (Read 14082 times)
Robl
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« Reply #15 on: January 22, 2012, 09:16:18 PM »

We bought a new elec cooker 6 months ago.  I chose on the basis of best efficiency - the new one has a triple glaze front door, and is insulated around the oven.  It uses about 1KWh to cook a chicken - so long as you keep the door closed, the oven stays at temperature for ages without the heater element being on.
It beats our old one (12 yrs old) hands down - that had no insulation at all, you could feel a warm draft of air from the back of it all the time it was on, and the 1.8KW heating element was on almost continuously to hold 180C temperature inside it.
I'm sure the same can be true of slow cookers - good & bad ones, it's all about the insulation, not the element power consumption.     
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M
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« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2012, 07:43:00 AM »

Don't want to disagree with everyone, but those watts sound high. We got a slow cooker in the summer to go with our PV, it has high, low, and stay warm.

The high is approx 150w, low 100w, (checked via energy monitor) we've found that cooking times are generally less than most recipes state. Eg if recipe say's 5 hours high, we find 5 low will do the job.

Generally we cook most meals (if in) 1 hour high, then about 4 low, so costs 500w to 800w. All within the PV time window, though during winter, not necessarily whilst generating enough when including background consumption.

The big plus though is that the meat is simply unbelievable! Couldn't find a knife one day, so dished out a pork joint with a fork and a spoon! At this rate, I'm in danger of de-evolving my teeth.

Mart.

PS We cover the top with a light tea towel, partly to keep some heat in, but mostly to stop the lid rattling when the pot is bubbling.
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Just call me Mart.     Cardiff: 5.58kWp PV - (3.58kWp SE3500 + 2kWp SE2200 WNW)
stannn
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« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2012, 12:43:53 PM »

Which model did you buy Mart?
Stan
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2.45 kWp PV (Navitron supply), 40 evacuated tubes (Navitron supply), Clearview 650 log burner with back-boiler heating cottage and water, 2 off 50W border collies, 1 off 35W cat, 1 off 25W cat.
melweb
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« Reply #18 on: January 30, 2012, 02:02:46 PM »

I bought one of these from Tesco about 18 months ago (cheap & cheerful for a tenner I think). I have to agree with Mart, meat is so much better than a conventional oven. Even my two boys say that my spareribs are as good as TGIF! Bought it after I'd had the pv installed to make use of the free leccy.
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M
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« Reply #19 on: January 30, 2012, 02:10:09 PM »

Which model did you buy Mart?
Stan

Sorry Stan, didn't mean to ignore you, missed this post.

Wifey bought a Breville ITP136

I think she said it cost about 12? It says 210W on the bottom, but doesn't seem to use that much. Looking at it now, it is 'smallish' so maybe my surprise at others energy consumption, is that their's are bigger than mine (so to speak).

M.
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Just call me Mart.     Cardiff: 5.58kWp PV - (3.58kWp SE3500 + 2kWp SE2200 WNW)
stannn
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« Reply #20 on: January 30, 2012, 02:36:28 PM »

Thanks Mart
Stan
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2.45 kWp PV (Navitron supply), 40 evacuated tubes (Navitron supply), Clearview 650 log burner with back-boiler heating cottage and water, 2 off 50W border collies, 1 off 35W cat, 1 off 25W cat.
Mike McMillan
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« Reply #21 on: January 07, 2018, 08:04:10 PM »

I bought a second hand crock pot early in 2017, thinking it had to be perfect for cooking with PV. As per the above comments, I was appalled by the lack of insulation. I started experimenting by covering it in towels, cooking high for an hour, after which it went into warm mode. It worked a treat, and I kept a log of how long it stayed on high before switching to warm. A whole chicken sitting on a wire grill in the ceramic pot with no water, was absolutely superb. Unfortunately, I inadvertently left it on high for 4 hours and of course melted some of the electronics.....
i would like to try gain, but cannot find any that have a thermostatic control. How simple would it be to retro fit one?  Anyone tried it? It is the way to go, using 250 watts for an hour and then almost nothing.

Mike

Osborne Bay
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Off grid; 4KWH install charging Rolls 24v 1000 A.H. batteries with 3 Tristar controllers. 3KW Victron Inverter with FIT meter on output. Relay driver automatically opens circuits as battery charges. 6 x 15 experimental solar collectors feeding 250 L. tank.  Angus wood gasification boiler.
Mike McMillan
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« Reply #22 on: Today at 06:22:44 AM »

As a follow up, I have just bought another second hand very cheap crock pot. I still cannot see an insulated slow cooker with a thermostat installed with a google search. crazy. Anyone have an idea of a suitable thermostat switch I could install on it??

Mike

Very dry and sunny Osborne Bay
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Off grid; 4KWH install charging Rolls 24v 1000 A.H. batteries with 3 Tristar controllers. 3KW Victron Inverter with FIT meter on output. Relay driver automatically opens circuits as battery charges. 6 x 15 experimental solar collectors feeding 250 L. tank.  Angus wood gasification boiler.
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