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Author Topic: Ideas for using heat from Oil-fired Aga Cooker  (Read 4358 times)
Jober
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« on: June 19, 2011, 09:11:33 AM »

We have a friend who has moved to a village with no gas connection. The Aga cooker is on all the time and it generates a lot of heat which is wasted, and the kitchen gets too hot in the summer. Does anyone have ideas on what could be done to use this wasted heat?
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Sharp 235NU x 17 = 3.99kWp, SB4000TL, Littlehampton, Lat - 50.8069, South
martin
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« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2011, 09:17:16 AM »

Sideways thinking - install solar hot water, meaning they can switch the thing off during the summer months.... Smiley
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Unpaid volunteer administrator and moderator (not employed by Navitron) - Views expressed are my own - curmudgeonly babyboomer! - http://www.farmco.co.uk
ecogeorge
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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2011, 10:49:12 AM »

Why is the Aga running 24/7 at this time of year ?  Is it the only source of water heating or cooking ?
Is it oil or solid fuel  ?
Not a very efficient use of energy if heating not required.
I'd second Martin (and have myself) -fit solar tubes for DHW (domestic hot water) -haven't put emersion heater on since 16thMay!
Use electric induction hob for cooking.
For heating house , - insulate insulate insulate and then insulate a bit more.
Consider GSHP if you have room - still runs on electricity and you may want a bit of grid independence - ie snowed in no electric!
Consider ASHP - some doubters here including me. Cheaper than GSHP to install and needs less room still runs on electricity and you may want a bit of grid independence - ie snowed in no electric!
Woodburner with backboiler option to run central heating - need supply of wood but electricity independent -may be important.
Multifuel stove with back boiler option to run central heating - easier to run for longer periods but burning coal/anthracite is a fossil fuel , -still better than burning it 24/7 in an Aga!
Fit pv to roof and claim 43.3 p /Kw produced. Use daytime electric to run GSHP or ASHP.
Running an Aga 24/7 although lovely in the winter would be a long way down on my list.
just my 2p worth.
rgds George.

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Jober
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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2011, 12:53:25 PM »

Aga is oil fired - very expensive to run. Aga only way of cooking. House is old listed. Don't think solar panels are an option, aspect not great. Personally, I would scrap the Aga, but our friends seem keen on it. They're not even using it to heat water for central heating! Mad, whoever intalled it!
« Last Edit: June 19, 2011, 12:56:11 PM by Jober » Logged

Sharp 235NU x 17 = 3.99kWp, SB4000TL, Littlehampton, Lat - 50.8069, South
martin
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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2011, 01:09:05 PM »

far from it! - they're wonderful devices, and a super warm "heart" to a home - they're a thumping great chunk of hot iron that can impart "slow heat" into a dwelling (many farmhouses would be uninhabitable due to damp without them), and are often "unofficial masonry stoves" due to the way they've been used.
Having said that, the only sane thing in this day and age is to let them go out for the summer season, use solar for domestic hot water ("listing" does NOT preclude it's use!), and use either bottled gas or electricity for cooking whilst it's off - we use solar hot water, one of those tiny "mini ovens" and electric hotplates when our Rayburn is turned off
« Last Edit: June 19, 2011, 01:12:18 PM by martin » Logged

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Ivan
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« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2011, 12:53:31 AM »

If you really must run it during the summer, convert it with a snugburner. This makes it on-demand, rather than continuous heat. Will save a fortune on oil bills.
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