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Author Topic: BT VOIP service  (Read 5176 times)
Ivan
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« on: June 08, 2011, 12:15:07 AM »

I've got a BT HomeHub2, and when I took out the package, I discovered that they had assigned an extra telephone number, which was available for VOIP use (ie with the BT Hub Phone) - which is very useful as a second landline. Much better, and more reliable than skype, incidentally.

My mother wants the same service, but BT have told her that they've withdrawn this service to new broadband customers. It seems that the new  BTHomeHub3 doesn't support hub phones. Which makes me wonder whether she could still get the service if she used a BTHomeHub2 instead of the BTHomeHub3 which she'll get sent if she takes out the service.

They have told her that she can subscribe to 'callsign' (which I guess costs her ), and again, I wondered whether it is possible to use HomeHub2 to route the calls to two separate phones.

Any ideas?
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wookey
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« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2011, 12:36:54 AM »

There are hordes of VOIP providers. Just pick one.

I've been using sipgate for years and am very happy with them. I have a cable internet connection, no phone connection at all, a hardware VOIP phone and a sipgate account (well 3 of them in fact with 3 numbers). Saves 130/yr on the phone line (this only works if you have a cable option for your net connection).

The beauty of a VOIP phone number is that you can set any device to be the 'phone': a real phone, or your laptop, or a mobile - whatever.

It doesn;t matter who your ISP is - anyone can provide VOIP service on any net conection. It helps if you have enough contrtol over your router to set routes.
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Ivan
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« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2011, 02:53:19 AM »

I tried Skype a few years ago, and the quality was rubbish - callers used to ask if I could call back on the landline. It also used to routinely 'switch off' the telephone number assigned to my skype phone, which I'd find out about weeks later - I had to call them to sort out the problem numerous times, which really put me off VOIP.

I tried standalone wireless VOIP phones too - which had really poor quality.

I like the idea of using ordinary handsets. Where do you get the 'sipgate adaptor' that enables these to be used?
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Tombo
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« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2011, 05:29:12 AM »

I use skype with a Dualphone at home mainly for work. Its worked fine for a few years now. You can't normally tell the difference between skype and the landline. 
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stephendv
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« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2011, 06:33:08 AM »

Ivan, there are a few options, you could get a dual SIP/DECT phone like the SIEMENS GIGASET SL375.  Or an adapter like the Linksys SPA3102-EU.  Or a wifi router that has SIP capabilities built in and place to connect DECT phones.  Draytek and Fritzbox both have options for this.
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Baz
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« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2011, 12:47:36 PM »

There is a difference between VOIP and internet phones which has been lost by the people like Skype missusing the term VOIP to con people into their lair. VOIP ensures good quality by giving the service priority over other traffic as far as the exchange where it is turned into a standard landline connection anyway. This can only happen if the service provider and phone provider cooperate or are one company and want to make the investment in the equipment. It is much more common in the rest of Europe.
BT must have found the extra 5 on the cost of the BTHH2 plus backend equipment was not justified by the number of people taking up the service so dropped it from the BTHH3 - cheaper chipset and save a connector, less testing, fewer fault calls etc. IF they have stopped adding the service you cannot get it enabled on the network even if you have an older Hub.
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profp
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« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2011, 01:09:12 PM »

I've got a BT HomeHub2, and when I took out the package, I discovered that they had assigned an extra telephone n
They have told her that she can subscribe to 'callsign' (which I guess costs her ), and again, I wondered whether it is possible to use HomeHub2 to route the calls to two separate phones.

Any ideas?

Callsign adapters can be used to route incoming calls to specific extensions/phones

http://www.amazon.co.uk/BT-Twin-Talk-Call-Enhancer/dp/B0001ME2OW


Classic example is where callsign is used to provide a dedicated number for a fax machine, but it works just as well for an ordinary phone.

Bear in mind that with callsign you can't make more than one concurrent call (in or outbound)


PS. If you decide on a VOIP option, I can recommend gradwell. Great service, fair price & excellent support. They can supply equipment pre-configured, which can take away a huge amount of the pain associated with getting started on VOIP.

« Last Edit: June 08, 2011, 01:11:51 PM by profp » Logged
djh
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« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2011, 01:46:08 PM »

There is a difference between VOIP and internet phones which has been lost by the people like Skype missusing the term VOIP to con people into their lair. VOIP ensures good quality by giving the service priority over other traffic as far as the exchange where it is turned into a standard landline connection anyway. This can only happen if the service provider and phone provider cooperate or are one company and want to make the investment in the equipment. It is much more common in the rest of Europe.

Sorry, but that's wrong. VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) is Internet telephony; end-to-end. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voice_over_IP

Skype is a low-end proprietary product that has its problems. But VOIP using SIP is happily used by many people and commercial organizations. You are quite right that traffic management to prioritize VOIP traffic is important for best quality.

What's happening at the exchanges is actually the reverse of what you say. The telcos are moving their long-haul trunks over to using VOIP instead of traditional circuits. See http://www.samknows.com/broadband/exchanges/21cn_overview for example. The 'cooperation' of VOIP providers and BT is mainly ensured by mandatory regulations.
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gr0mit
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« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2011, 05:10:00 PM »

Hi
I have been runing a voip telephony service for the last 3 years and have customers using my service in Paris, Durban, Gibraltar and even Macclesfield and Leeds.

As long as you have a decent internet connection and enable traffic shaping on the router, you really can't tell the difference from a phone call on a fixed analogue or ISDN line.  When I talk to prospective customers who express concerns about call quality they have heard about, I just let them talk. Then 10 mins into the call that actually this is a voip call.  It takes the wind out of their sails very fast, and often clinches the deal!

There are loads of residential voip services, none of which I can vouch for. Sipgate, Gradwell, Voipfone, to name but a few. As regards handsets, I recommend the Gigaset A580IP (around 60) which works with both voip and the analogue line.  If you want a fixed phone then a Snom300 or any Polycom IP phone.

hope this helps.
Rgds
Tim Robinson
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