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Author Topic: ultra small computer  (Read 28354 times)
petertc
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« on: June 20, 2011, 08:00:26 PM »

Take a look at this UK Charity looking at selling these  for £15

http://news.cnet.com/raspberry-pi-computer-on-a-stick-for-only-$25/8301-17938_105-20060489-1.html
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martin
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« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2011, 08:17:13 PM »

looking good! Smiley
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Baz
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« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2011, 09:06:51 PM »

rather pointless as linux is far too complicated for a beginner/kid unless already into more complex stuff in which case they will be playing robots with one of the existing small micros. So some may get it and be put off because it requires some effort, or be put off because it doesn't play fancy games.
To seriously get kids to understand programming it would be better to have a simple version of Basic on android phones that has just enough power to let people program tunes and a few other things - then when they have got the gist of that have something compatible but more advanced on their PC.

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acresswell
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« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2011, 09:17:32 PM »

I agree about Linux... most young people aren't interested in the operating system.  Much more motivating for them to have a play with a simple programming language.  It still amazes me how intrigued students can be by something as simple as:
   10 INPUT"What is your name ";A$
   20 PRINT "Hello";A$
...and the real buzz they get when using VB to do something similar that looks like a proper application!


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dhaslam
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« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2011, 12:23:26 AM »

It is amazing what android phones can do.   They have a lot of storage capacity , fairly high resolution screen  and very quick processing.   With some  development of wireless peripherals  they will  have a lot of potential.   Still a  bit expensive but   they will come down in price.    It should be possible to  write simple applications.   

This calculator on a touch screen shows how the display quality has come a long way.     

     


* Calculator.jpg (50.87 KB, 449x800 - viewed 1309 times.)
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« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2011, 11:33:01 PM »

http://www.raspberrypi.org/

for any one whos intrested this it the actual web address
nice thing is @ the cost your not going to worry if your kid blows it up!
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w0067814
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« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2011, 11:20:25 AM »

rather pointless as linux is far too complicated for a beginner/kid unless already into more complex stuff in which case they will be playing robots with one of the existing small micros.

It all depends on the environment that is built for the Raspberry Pi. Once all the hardware drivers exist, and there are easy to use API's then the user don't need to know the inner workings of Linux. You don't need to know the inner workings of Linux to write a program in Java for instance - which is essentially what Android runs - Android is of course basically Linux.

So some may get it and be put off because it requires some effort, or be put off because it doesn't play fancy games.
I've got Quake II running on the Raspberry Pi at 1900x1080 true 3D (on a Panasonic 50" 3D TV with 3D glasses) and it's amazing. No problem playing full HD video content either, infact it can wrap a full HD video on to an object in real time - it's mind boggling to see Avatar playing smoothly at full speed whilst wrapped on to the wire frame of a revolving tea pot (not the chocolate type either)!

To seriously get kids to understand programming it would be better to have a simple version of Basic on android phones that has just enough power to let people program tunes and a few other things - then when they have got the gist of that have something compatible but more advanced on their PC.
Ahh you miss the point - for $25 for the Pi, plus a keyboard and a telly (can be any TV with either composite or HDMI inputs) you've got everything you need to get going. With Android, then you need a PC and a phone, which are out of reach for many in the UK let alone 3rd world countries. The processor in the Pi is actually used in many phones - and it can run Android just fine.

Why not check out the video below starring Dev Patel (Slumdog Millionnaire), Charles Dance, and Pamela Anderson. It was made to show case the capabilities of the Nokia N8 which is powered by the Broadcom VideoCORE III processor. The Raspberry Pi is powered by the Broadcom VideoCORE IV processor (BCM2835) which is considerable jump up in performance, not to mention increasing from 720p to 1080p graphics. The video was shot entirely on the Nokia N8 by the way - which shows just how far mobile phone video has come!

http://youtu.be/PVISpc7EDEk?hd=1    (High Def 720p - best watched full screen)
            (Normal Youtube)

Roku use the VideoCORE IV (BCM2835) in their Roku 2 product - a streaming TV media player with Nintendo Wii style remote control for gaming.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roku
http://the-gadgeteer.com/2011/11/28/roku-2-xs-and-xd-streaming-media-players-review/


-Tim
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w0067814
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« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2012, 11:24:57 AM »

Just to let you all know that you can buy one of the very first Raspberry Pi's to come off the production line. There is a limited edition of ten boards being auctioned on eBay right now. Two per day for 5 days running, starting with #10 and working down to #1.


http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/482

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/raspberry_pi/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_from=&_ipg=25&_trksid=p3686

-Tim
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wookey
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« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2012, 12:33:31 PM »

aha, finally - some actual hardware. Cool.

I'd be a lot more enthusiastic if the Pi came with free graphics drivers (and wasn't made by Broadcom, who represent an enormous amount of what is very bad about the mobile computing industry - they use GPL code everywhere but do their level best not to provide driver code to anyone else and let chinese ODMs carry the can).

If you want to try a tiny cheap, capable Linux machine, then this one has better specs than the Pi and is made by people who actually care about sharing the code and co-operating:  http://rhombus-tech.net/

The Pi seems to be a loss-leader to get more people onto Broadcom's videocore platform. Still, it is good value, just be aware you are dancing with the devil.

Perhaps the biggest advantage of the rhombus-tech device is that you get 1G ram and a SATA interface and ethernet so you can use it as a real computer, rather than the 128MB + USB of the Pi. That means proper, fast native development. What I don't know is when you'll actually be able to buy one: 'soon' is what I was told before xmas. But do put in a pre-order if you think it's a good thing.

I see there is now a 'model B' Pi announced which has 256Mb + ethernet. That's a lot more useful, but still no SATA. That really hurts - I know, I've got lots of ARM devices with no SATA and it's painfull if you want to do real computing.
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Wookey
Jeremy
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« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2012, 12:44:00 PM »

aha, finally - some actual hardware. Cool.

Have you checked the prices?  Beta boards going for a minimum (at current bid price) of £565 (each.......................).  Someone has bid £1900 for one!
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Heinz
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« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2012, 12:45:22 PM »

£1900 and still got four days to go !!! Cheap, it ain't....

Heinz
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clivejo
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« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2012, 12:52:00 PM »

Getting very frustrated now.  Originally due to launch before Xmas, I wanted one as a Christmas present to myself!  They then delayed until the end of January, its now the 31st Jan and still no Christmas present  Cry

*strops* I want one, I want one!
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wookey
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« Reply #12 on: January 31, 2012, 05:31:24 PM »

There are lots of other linux ARM machines available. Why not buy one of those? A free driver for the ARM  Mali graphics core was announced a couple of days ago, which suddenly means you have 'good' choices as well as bad ones, and rasbery Pi is in the 'bad' camp. I certainly won't be buying any ARM hardware with non-free GPU drivers now that it's possible to pick one that isn't stuck with vendor kernels.

I haven't looked up the full list yet but the Samsung Origen board and ST-Eriscsson Snowball boards are both Mali, and supported by Linaro which makes working images trivial to come by: http://www.linaro.org/low-cost-development-boards/

Not quite as cheap as you might like at $199 and Ä240 respectively. But then that's looking pretty good in comparison to $1900 for a Pi :-), and they'll ship today. Or you can have an imx53 for £100. That has real SATA so you can do actual work with it  - it's a real computer, with useful amounts of RAM (1G). Probably the best low-power home server and definately the best ARM build farm machine you can get at the moment.

Or for Ä200 you can have a whole tablet with mali 400 in: http://aseigo.blogspot.com/2012/01/reveal.html but there will still be a wait for actual hardware there.

Things are looking good with genuinely open options appearing at very reasonable prices. Lots of reasons not to buy a closed-driver Pi IMHO, even if it is cheap. You'll regret it.
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clivejo
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« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2012, 06:55:00 PM »

I dont care about the graphics TBH.  I want one for the low power, linux kernel, and Ethernet connection for about £30
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Paulh_Boats
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« Reply #14 on: February 01, 2012, 08:46:06 PM »

Read all the comments about the Raspberry PI. 

At work the entire team of software engineers I work with think the Raspberry PI is the greatest thing since the Nascom/Spectrum/BBC Computer. My background is electronics/micro chips and I think its an excellent design with killer features that will dominate both the educational and hobbyist markets.

The Broadcom GPU has OpenGL driver support which is all you need for portable engineering graphics - yes they have hidden the internal registry details for commerical reasons (to keep the costs down and performance up) but the best way for kids to learn graphics is something like OpenGL or a language that wraps around it.

Python Game looks good for example:
http://www.youtube.com/user/RaspberryPiTutorials?feature=watch

We already have ideas about supporting the RPi in the educational market - but Mums the word.

-Paul
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