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Author Topic: Mothballing a battery bank .  (Read 1409 times)
Paul and Rona
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« on: July 30, 2011, 04:13:20 PM »

As a general rule of thumb, what charge current as a percentage of capacity, is required to keep a battery bank "Mothballed" ?

For example if i have a 24 Volt 100Ah bank, which is to be Mothballed what sort of "Trickel" charge will be required to keep in in good repair?.

By Mothballed i mean a bank that is in good condition and is first fully charged then left to stand over winter :freeze with NO load connected

And would it also be worthwhile subjecting it to an automatic EQ charge once a month, to keep the sulphates at bay ?

Regards Paul...
« Last Edit: July 30, 2011, 04:15:11 PM by Paul and Rona » Logged

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spluger
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its why i'm doing it


« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2011, 08:18:28 PM »

with Hawker AGM lead acid batteries the advise was to freeze them then they would last 10+ years

i saw some used after 5 years in the freezer and worked as good as new but i doubt it would work on flooded cells but keeping them cold may help.

David
 
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« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2011, 11:22:05 AM »

The manufacturer's datasheet for your battery should tell you what the self-discharge rate is - it's usually around 2% of capacity per month.
If it's practical, I would leave it on a permanent float charge. With a no-load bank, provided it is fully charged to start with, you could use a low current charger to maintain state - such as those intended for use with invalid scooters (Invalid scooters are generally 24v). Numax also sell chargers specifically intended for long term float charge maintenance.
The other option to keep them topped up would be a small set of solar panels - size according to self-discharge rate, depending on bank size you may not even need a charge controller.
HTH
P.
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Paul and Rona
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« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2011, 09:55:37 AM »

Hi Chaps,
             Thanks for the comments, the battery bank if one can call it such, is actually a hoch-poch of assorted batts
the only reason I am considering mothballing it over winter, is that my current home has still not sold and it looks as if were going to spend another winter in this house, and I dont wish to kill the batts.

It looks like plan B then, fully charge them ready for the winter and then connect up the small 20w panel we got from Navitron to trickle charge them....

Regards Paul. 
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