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Author Topic: Fitting a new stove  (Read 10531 times)
Moxi
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« on: August 15, 2011, 04:47:00 PM »

I was poking around in the spare room of the cottage at the weekend and couldn't resist pulling the polystyrene " blank" that the previously owner had fitted in the chimney breast to have a look.

after all the dust twigs snail shells and grit had fallen I was able to see some more expanding foam and wire shoved in with debris in an attempt to stop the draughts.

I want to open the chimney and install a wood burning stove with back boiler to run some radiators in the winter and wondered what the requirements will be for the chimney (the cottage is 120 yrs old) will I need to sweep the chimney free of debris and then install the stove with register plate or will i need to pull a liner up the chimney ?

Is there anything else I need to consider ? This will be a longish term project as money is as always tight and i will need to do as much as is legally possible.  Any nuggets of advice greatly welcomed.

Moxi

ps still haven't got the damper free on the lounge stove used almost a can of pentrating oil and scraped as much rust away as i could ?
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camillitech
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« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2011, 04:58:05 PM »

Definitely line it Moxi,

when I bought my first woodburner some 22 years ago I could not afford the liner, twelve months later I fitted one and was staggered at the difference that it made. Far better draw, easier to light (not that it was hard anyway) but most of all the tar stopped leaching through the walls instantly.

Good luck, Paul
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'Off grid' since 1985,  Proven 2.5kW, Proven 6kW direct heating, SI6.OH, 800ah Rolls, 4.75kW PV ,4xTS45, Lister HR2 12kW, , Powerspout pelton, Stream Engine turgo, 60 x Navitron toobs and a 1500lt store. Outback VFX3048 and 950ah forklifts for backup,
johnrae
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« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2011, 05:11:18 PM »

Definitely a liner but pull it down not up - gravity is the curse of all who try to elevate things. 
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Moxi
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« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2011, 05:21:15 PM »

Cheers gents, that's usefull, I will start more investigations next weekend (working away) and remove more packageing and have a route around.

Do liners tend to go in easily ? from the top down I would say its about two meters then a 30 degree kick diagonally to the front room then another 2 meters vertical ? 

Moxi
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camillitech
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« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2011, 05:45:40 PM »

Mine was a piece of cake Moxi but I did drop a trawl float (Which was about 1" larger) down first just to make sure  Grin

Cheers, Paul
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http://lifeattheendoftheroad.wordpress.com/

'Off grid' since 1985,  Proven 2.5kW, Proven 6kW direct heating, SI6.OH, 800ah Rolls, 4.75kW PV ,4xTS45, Lister HR2 12kW, , Powerspout pelton, Stream Engine turgo, 60 x Navitron toobs and a 1500lt store. Outback VFX3048 and 950ah forklifts for backup,
johnrae
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« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2011, 06:23:47 PM »

It'll take two of you if there is a kick in the chimney, one feeding and the other pulling (and getting black!)
You'll need a pulling head, I used a large plastic cistern float (6" diameter) but you can buy purpose built heads quite cheaply.  This gives a rounded nose to the liner to prevent it catching up on chimney ledges.  Use a stout rope and make sure you use at least half a roll of gaffer tape to fix the rope and "ball" to the end of the liner since it might take a bit of effort to get it round the bends.
Make sure you get it in the right way - there is a preferred flow direction.
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County 4x4
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« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2011, 04:25:12 AM »

...amd if you want it done "legally", you'll have to get a HETAS registered fitter to do the installation, OR have it signed off by the local building control department. Avoid this bit, and you're looking at the possibility of your insurance being invalid if there ever happened to be a claim arising from any chimney/fire issues.

As has been said, make sure it goes in the right way up! And make sure the chimney has been properly swept before you get the liner in.

Andy
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camillitech
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« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2011, 06:06:22 AM »

...amd if you want it done "legally", you'll have to get a HETAS registered fitter to do the installation, OR have it signed off by the local building control department. Avoid this bit, and you're looking at the possibility of your insurance being invalid if there ever happened to be a claim arising from any chimney/fire issues.

As has been said, make sure it goes in the right way up! And make sure the chimney has been properly swept before you get the liner in.

Andy

Or you could just not bother fitting one at all then there would be a greater likelihood of a fire, but that would be fine because your insurance company might pay out  banghead

THE WORLD HAS GONE MAD  Grin
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http://lifeattheendoftheroad.wordpress.com/

'Off grid' since 1985,  Proven 2.5kW, Proven 6kW direct heating, SI6.OH, 800ah Rolls, 4.75kW PV ,4xTS45, Lister HR2 12kW, , Powerspout pelton, Stream Engine turgo, 60 x Navitron toobs and a 1500lt store. Outback VFX3048 and 950ah forklifts for backup,
Moxi
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« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2011, 09:00:09 AM »

Hmmm,

This is looking like a job that I would be better off paying the trained and registered peeps to do, oh well I thought I might save a few quid but maybe that would be a false economy in this instance.

I think I will save a little longer and have a HETAS qualified engineer fit the stove and liner, maybe I can save a bit by installing the plumbing element or is there a law / quango on that these days  Huh  Thanks for the advice though guys I'm glad I asked otherwise i may have started a costly gaff !

I will continue to clear the chimney of debris as i expect that will assist the HETAS engineer and speed installation up and hopefully reduce the costs.

Moxi
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Tigger
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« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2011, 11:11:15 AM »

Moxi,

I had my chimney swept in preparation and then did as much of the 'heavy manual stuff'' as I could for the plumbing (drilling holes in walls, lifting floorboards, cutting holes through joists etc) so that my HETAS guy then dropped in the chimney liner and installed the stove and then connected up the plumbing and signed it off.

That way, I did all the heavy/not-so-skilled work and there was still enough left to make it worthwhile for him to come and finish it all off and give me my HETAS certificate.

At a few hundred ús for the liner, I didn't want to risk damaging it and having to pay twice.....

Ian.
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30 tubes, south facing gable wall (Navitron Fornax Trial System).  Hunter Herald 8, integrated boiler hooked up with Oil Boiler via H2 control panel.  Scrounging fire wood wherever possible Smiley
Moxi
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« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2011, 12:01:45 PM »

Tigger,

Thanks for that, I've decided with all the advice that that is definitely the right route to go and like you say the chance of a mess up and the associated cost of materials makes using the HETAS engineer for the clever bits the more appropriate option.

Cheers guys, I will update the thread for info as I get bits done

Moxi
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Tigger
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« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2011, 12:04:11 PM »

So now we all look forward to a plethora of visual updates  Smiley
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30 tubes, south facing gable wall (Navitron Fornax Trial System).  Hunter Herald 8, integrated boiler hooked up with Oil Boiler via H2 control panel.  Scrounging fire wood wherever possible Smiley
dtl
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« Reply #12 on: August 17, 2011, 03:43:07 PM »

.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2011, 03:53:06 PM by dtl » Logged
Moxi
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« Reply #13 on: August 17, 2011, 04:55:09 PM »

lol have to give me time dtl I work at the other end of the country to the cottage at the moment so geeting the photo's sorted is a long term task

Moxi
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dtl
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« Reply #14 on: August 17, 2011, 06:45:31 PM »

Moxi,

Sorry I was not pestering you, I wrote a post on the HETAS/building warrant requirements for Scotland and then deleted it whilst I checked the facts a bit more.

It would seem that it is not necessary to use a HETAS registered plumber in Scotland.
Taken from HETAS website - "In Scotland there are different requirements and a building warrant scheme is in operation, currently administered by SBSA"
It is only necessary to install the stove according to building regulations.

Further, for many situations when fitting a stove within an existing fireplace and chimney it is not necessary to obtain a building warrant or have the installation signed off by Building Control:

With reference to Schedule 3 of this link, which describes jobs which do not require a building warrant, which is basically an extract from SBSA;

http://www.angus.gov.uk/atoz/pdfs/section8-8.pdf

Paragraph 6 makes a statement regarding the fitting of stoves, there are some exclusions regarding the size of the stove, and work on chimneys flues or hearths.

However, paragraph 9 allows one to install a flue liner without a warrant.

Further, paragraph 24 would then seem to allow work on an existing hearth and flue as long as it is an improvement.

« Last Edit: August 17, 2011, 08:16:01 PM by dtl » Logged
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