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Author Topic: Fitting a new stove  (Read 10507 times)
dtl
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« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2011, 03:26:21 PM »

This link describes the building warrant requirements for multi fuel stoves in Scotland:

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Built-Environment/Building/Building-standards/publications/glf5

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Moxi
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« Reply #16 on: August 19, 2011, 10:52:14 AM »

Hi dtl,

Thanks for the information, i will look in to whats required in Wales and see if there is a similar approach.

I'm just getting ready to travel the 300 plus miles back home after a week of work and high on my to do list is a bit more chimney investigation  Wink

Moxi
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Stoozy
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« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2011, 12:08:38 AM »

Hi Moxi - don't be put off fitting the liner yourself.  I am in Scotland and went down the building warrant route. I think you will find that any alteration to chimneys and flues do require a building warrant or to be fitted by a HETAS registered installer (certainly in Scotland).  I also opened up my fireplace to accommodate a bigger stove.  I fitted about about 7 metres of double skinned stainless liner from the top after sweeping it myself.  I have a 45 degree bend in the last section at about 1 metre in length.  I did the job in about 2 - 3 hours.  I firstly swept the chimney from the top after taping a bag at the bottom.  I then dropped a weighted  rope down the chimney. I then taped on a 2 litre coke bottle (empty Smiley) with the bottom cut off it to the liner and hauled it up to the chimney.  I did wear a safety harness attached to the chimney.  I then taped the rope to liner and coke bottle. I then started to feed the liner down the chimney.  It did get stuck at the bend so I had to go down and pull the rope and free it.  The register plate I made up myself but you can get these made for you on stovesonline.co.uk and other places.  I used a pot hanging cowl to go over the chimney that attaches to the liner.  I can give you a copy off my warrant if you are interested.
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dtl
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« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2011, 06:18:37 AM »

Stoozy,

I think you are wrong about the building warrant requirement in Scotland, certainly for most simple installations.
Look at this link from the Scottish Government/SABSM;

http://www.Scotland.gov.UK/Topics//Building//publications/golf5.

With respect to using a HETAS approved installer, I phoned the HETAS head office before my install and they confirmed that HETAS approval was not a requirement in Scotland.

Obviously the usual small print applies to the above/do your own research.

It sounds as though your local Scottish Council Planning Department advised you that you needed Building Control to sign off off your install and they subsequently charged you for their services.

If I was you I would contact your Local Council and ask them to clarify their understanding of the link I have provided above, with respect to the work you performed.

The Scottish Government owns the building regulations and passes them out to Local Councils, there are differing local interpretations of the regulations, but this is only where wording of the regulations is ambiguous.
The wording in the above link looks very clear to me.

You could be due a refund from your Local Council.

« Last Edit: September 17, 2011, 07:13:34 AM by dtl » Logged
wookey
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« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2011, 09:34:01 PM »

Moxi - I've just done a chimney lining and it's simple enough. It saved me about a grand over paying the HETAS guy.

You may not _need_ to line your chimney. I didn't in previous house (1930s semi), and it ran fine for about 7 years.  On the other hand, I didn't to start with either in this one (1960s detached) and after 3 years I got mank leaking out of the chimney in the loft. It had previously been rendered badly so probably was never a good chimney.

So, whether you need a liner or not depends on the state of your chimney (it's the same stove in this case).

I haven't actually lit the new one to see if the stove works noteciably better (it's not cold yet), but it worked just fine before. Now I have a nice cowl and bird-proof top and better insulated flue which is all good. Total cost of bits was 500, (going for the expensive 904/904 liner as there didn't seem much point getting a 160 liner instead of a 240 liner if it meant doing it all again in 10yrs rather than 20). There are a host of online suppliers.

Fitting the liner itself took about 10 mins (6" liner in 9" square chimney with one kink about 1.5m above the fireplace). Fitting/Making the register/closure plate took about 1.5 days, then another best-part-of-day for backfilling insulation, fitting cowl and flaunching chimney. Fitting details here: http://www.greenbuildingforum.co.uk/newforum/comments.php?DiscussionID=7732&page=1#Item_14

Hetas quote for the job was 1600. Building control fee is 100+VAT. (complete bloody rip off for a pleasant but largely clueless man to come and tell me that I have indeed read the regs).

So it's a straightforward one-weekend DIY task, and you can save a reasonable amount of money over paying someone else to do it, with the usual satisfaction that you've done a careful job.

It can of course be a complete pain getting the liner down the chimney and you'll have to make holes at corners to sort it (I know of one mate who had this), but that's the exception rather than the rule.
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Wookey
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« Reply #20 on: September 18, 2011, 09:29:36 AM »

Hi dtl - you are right.  Flue lining doesn't require a building warrant, won't be able to get a refund though as the other part of my work was opening up the fireplace with the fitting of a lintel.  Boy that was fun doing it by yourself... not.

 
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Moxi
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« Reply #21 on: September 19, 2011, 03:01:57 PM »

Hi Wookey,

Thank you for the link and the advice, I will take my time and consider the options and when ready make a start on the second stove for the snug.  I'm just getting my head around a thousand an one things to do to get my little welsh cottage fit for efficient comfortable living including insulation on the floors, roof, skeiling and walls etc etc so this is all helpfull as it allows me to see the "bigger picture" with regard to where to start and what to save for and what i can do myself   crack

Cheers

moxi
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