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Author Topic: Flue.  (Read 6550 times)
keith2
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« on: October 17, 2011, 07:55:27 PM »

I've bought an Effel oil burning stove,like a log burner but uses liquid fuel,which i plan to run on home made biodiesel.At the moment i have an open fire which burns coal and logs and is swept regularly and i want to put the flue for the Effel up the existing chimney.I really need someone to explain why i can't just take a metre of flue and fix this up the existing chimney.Why do i need to put the flue all the way up the chimney.I'm assuming it's a safety issue but i'm more likely to do it properly if someone can tell me what the problems will be if i try it my way.
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Billy
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« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2011, 08:19:18 PM »

If memory serves me right - is it not the acidic nature of the exhaust that eats away into the chimney fabric.  I run a drip feed oil burner to run the gravity central heating and it uses a double skinned stainless flue.

billy
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keith2
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« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2011, 05:44:57 AM »

Thanks Billy.I'm not sure if i'm capable of fitting a proper solid walled flue but i've seen flexible flue that i think i could manage.Does anyone have any opinion or experience of this flexible flue material and it's suitability,long term performance etc.
I should have mentioned that i don't plan to put the stove in the fireplace.I want to sit it in the room about 3 feet in front of the fireplace so there won't be a lot of heat going up the chimney.I don't know if this makes any difference or not.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2011, 06:10:39 AM by keith2 » Logged
baker
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« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2011, 09:53:17 AM »


 
 sometimes its got to do with
diameter of the spigot on the boiler outlet  continuous free flow to termination
flue gas temperature / to heat  twin wall insulated flue to revvent  corrosive condensation and moisture
seeping back to boiler combustion chamber
also to stop combustion products entering rooms where the flue duct passes
would advise to get it checked and fit a CO alarm when completed
hope this helps
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Billy
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« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2011, 09:56:11 AM »

Stainless flexi liners are fine and used all the time.  Just make sure the one you get is suitable for oil/gas.  I put one in our house many years ago for the wood burner, still ok at we visit the present owners.  We didn't backfill with insulation but even so it made a vast difference to the pull of the flue on a cold windless day.  Don't know whether one does the same for oil or about how long they would last.  They certainly don't seem to hand the guarantees out like they do with multi-fuel liners.

billy
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camillitech
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« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2011, 10:51:04 AM »

I have something similar, a Morso Squirrel converted to oil (don't ask  Roll Eyes ) you need to consult the stove manufacturer as to what size flue they recommend. Mine is only 4" any larger and it won't work properly. A friend of mine had a similar stove and used the existing large 8" flue, it took him about six years to work out why it never worked properly  Roll Eyes Flexible stainless liner is definitely the way to go.

Good luck, Paul
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« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2011, 07:31:02 PM »

Hallo Keith are you planning to use a flexible liner  outside the chimney/flue, it,s certainly not allowed in the gas world.
 
Just a thought
Desp
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www.jandhbuilders.co.uk

still a crazy old duffer!
keith2
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« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2011, 12:16:51 PM »

No.The flexi liner goes up the inside of the existing house chimney.
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Baz
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« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2011, 12:36:02 PM »

Getting back to the reason I think the problem is the acid in the exhaust. Oil contains (is) hydrocarbons with imputities of sulphur. The former produces water when it burns in copious quantities and the latter SO2 which disolves in the water to produce sulphuric acid.  Coal also has sulphur but few hydrocarbons being mostly carbon (coke is even better) so the SO2 goes up and out the chimney to rain down the sulphuric acid on Norway.
Wood has less sulphur though it does produce lots of water in combustion but not as much as oil, So that's why you want to keep your wood or oil fire hot but coke is kinder to chimneys.
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