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Author Topic: WRB09 - Compressor pressure too high  (Read 2614 times)
rogermunns
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« on: January 09, 2012, 05:48:29 PM »

I keep getting a stop on error Eo04 - compressor pressure too high. Anyone know why this is?
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knighty
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« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2012, 05:52:12 PM »

probably condenser overheat

if the refrigerant isn't cooled enough, it won't condense back to liquid, staying as a gas with a higher volume and pushing the pressure up



is the pump for your heating working ok ?  any idea of the flow through the heat pump ?

or have you turned the temperature right up ?

any idea of the temperature in/our ?
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Richard Owen
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« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2012, 06:14:26 PM »

I think it's a flow problem as well.

I've had both the overpressure (Eo04) and the underpressure (Eo05) errors and fixed them both with flow control.

It's a while ago now but I think the overpressure was due to low flow in the ground loop (as Knighty points out) and the overpressure was due to low flow on the house side. Or it might have been the other way around. Anyway, reconfiguring the pump in the ground loop and changing the by-pass valve settings in the house fixed the problems.
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44 Yingli 230Wp panels feeding into 2x Solar Edge SE5000 inverters.
20x 58mm SE, 20x 58mm SW, Solar Thermal feeding 320l thermal store.
10kW heat pump.
300W of Hydro Power.
ecogeorge
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« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2012, 07:24:20 PM »

Also be aware if you're ground loop has little or no anti-freeze and the flow is disrupted -airlock / lack of water etc it doesn't half take some thawing out of the heat exchanger!  Don't ask me how I know whistlie
rgds George.
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welshboy
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« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2012, 09:29:55 PM »

Like Ecogeorge I have had an Eo05 error due to low flow on the groundloop freezing the Heat x - Thawing out and cleaning the filter solved it.
Also had Eo04 which was caused by crud in the house side(heating )internal pump and the house side filter. Seems that if the pump cannot get the heat away quick enough the E004 error shut down protects the system
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rogermunns
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2012, 10:06:40 AM »

Thanks, I'm pretty sure it was low flow heating flow (in house). Because I have insufficient outdoor underground pipework I am struggling to heat the  whole of the floor. In fact, I can only heat 2 or 3 of the 7 zones.

I am hopefully going to address this next winter by using our swimming pool water as an additional heat source.

Could someone please give me an idea as to the heat contained in 55cu.m. i.e. how many kWh are there potentially in that amount of water starting at, say, 20deg.C and ending at 7 deg. C?
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Countrypaul
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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2012, 12:07:13 PM »

55m3 * 1000 kg/m3 * 4200J/kg/K * 13K = 3003000000J = ~3GJ = ~834kWh

I think

Paul
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rogermunns
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« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2012, 02:36:58 PM »

Thanks Paul, that's quite re-assuring. I'm going to put 3 or 4 solar panels onto the pool so as to extend the season, but they will also contribute a bit through the winter. Maybe enough to counteract the losses - the pool surface will be insulated as will the sides (it is above-ground, with insulation underneath). We'll give it a go, anyway.

To confirm, if I have a modest COP of say 2.5, then can I assume that 800kWh converts to 2000kWh or am I double counting?
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Countrypaul
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« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2012, 11:47:20 PM »

Roger the heat in the pool that can be taken out by dropping the temperature from 20 to 7C is 800kWh. If you take out 2000kWh you will be freezing a large part of the pool. So I think you are sort of double accounting.

If you have a cop of 2.5 then if you use 100kWh of electric you will get out 250kWh of heat, 150kWh of which comes from your pool. If you use 500kWh of electric you will get out 1250kWh of heat, 750kWh of which will have come from the pool.

HTH

Paul
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rogermunns
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« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2012, 05:05:19 AM »

Thanks again, Paul.
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