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Author Topic: new encryption on old wireless card?  (Read 4135 times)
Ivan
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« on: January 24, 2012, 12:38:26 AM »

I have a BT homehub, with WPA encryption implemented (I think).

I have an oldish PC which I use quite regularly, and it would be handy to have a wireless connection. It has Windows2000 software and an old PCI wireless card (according to the driver it's 'IEEE 802.11b wireless cardbus/PCI adaptor ' - I'm not sure if that's manufacturer/model identity or a generic driver). Although it 'sees' the network it can't connect to it. I only have the option of WEP when I try to connect.

I'm assuming either the driver (5.140.521.2003) or the wireless card itself isn't compatible with WPA security. I don't want to downgrade to a lower level of wireless security as I live next to a busy school. Is it possible to get this wireless adaptor to speak to the network or am I wasting my time trying?
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kalas666
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« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2012, 10:14:40 AM »

Hi Ivan,  You need to log on to the home hub;  go to the wireless section; and set the protocol to 'b' compatable.(It may well be set to 'g' or 'n' or a mix of the 2)  That should also give you the option to set 'wep' as your security.

If you want some more detailed instructions I can help.  (trying to not be too condesending  Wink)

Chris
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Countrypaul
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« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2012, 11:20:45 AM »

Do you know the make/model of the PCI card? If you want to run WPA on it you may need to update the drivers under W2000. The information you have given is rather generic and doesn't give the make/model of the card - it looks as though it is using a generic driver though.

Paul
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Ivan
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« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2012, 03:38:14 AM »

My understanding (admittedly fuzzy) is that WEP isn't actually very secure. You can crack it within a few days or less using suitable software. WPA is supposed to be more secure - hence I'd rather keep that as I beam a nice strong signal across a local comprehensive school with a few thousand kids (must be a few hackers in there somewhere).

Is it likely that I can update the driver to enable WPA on the old card? I've no idea what it is - those are the only details listed in windows. Yes, it looks like a standard driver. The only way I can get any further info, is to rip to lid off to see what's actually written on the card itself. I had a look on the internet to see if I could find an updated driver with similar name, but so far not.
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Paul and Rona
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« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2012, 06:52:54 AM »

Hi Ivan,
         Your correct, WEP is pretty naff. If you run "Backtrack 4 or 5" with a suitable wifi card that can handle packet injection you can indeed crack WEP in double quick time.

Use WPA at the very least to ensure your protection.

Look at the actual card in your machine... and also make a note of it's version number, alternatively see if you can get the chip set info for your card and search for suitable drivers from this info.

Regards Paul

P.S. From personal experience, theres more chance of the School Teks trying to hack you, rather than the students...
« Last Edit: January 26, 2012, 06:55:38 AM by Paul and Rona » Logged

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Antman
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« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2012, 07:50:33 AM »

Ivan

May not be worth the hassle messing with an obsolete card. Try something like http://www.novatech.co.uk/products/networking/wirelessnetworking/wirelesspcicards/nov-npci.html
Covers all OS incl W2000 and goes up to the more recent WPA2-PSK.

The external aerial cards seem to work very well and the aerial(s) are more directable than 'dongle' adaptors which you somethimes need on a short USB cable to oprimise signal penetration.

Antmam

PS  Actually your greatest risk is in picking-up a virus from the internet using the obsolete OS than someone bothering to hack the WEP encryption  tumble
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kalas666
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« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2012, 09:02:29 AM »

The best way to be secure is to hide your SSID!!!!!  It then doesn't matter what encryption is on the router if you can't find it :-)

Chris
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« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2012, 12:12:19 PM »

The best way to be secure is to hide your SSID!!!!!  It then doesn't matter what encryption is on the router if you can't find it :-)

Chris

That's fine if nothing is ever connected to your wireless. As soon as something legitimate is connected then it is possible to identify the SSID by snooping and analyzing the packets between the two devices. Once the SSID is known, the rest becomes easy.

Even specific MAC filtering is not safe, since it is relatively easy to snoop a device MAC and then spoof the MAC address for an attacker.

If you're at all worried then you need to be using WPA, or preferably WPA2 security and lock down access to machines/shares with usernames and robust passwords.
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Ivan
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« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2012, 02:07:38 AM »

I think that's exactly what I've got - WPA2. But the downside of this security is not being able to connect legitimate devices. Will see if I can get the wireless card out of the PC on the weekend and go searching for new drivers, but I think Antman might be right. I've got a few usb devices, might see if I can get wpa2 going on one of them as a fall-back.
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stephendv
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« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2012, 07:51:42 AM »

If the card only supports 802.11b, then WPA is not supported and finding different drivers won't change that.  WPA is only supported on G, N or A devices.  Regarding WEP security, you can crack it in a few minutes/hours, and as MarkB said hiding the SSID doesn't help much against passive sniffing tools.
A cheapo 802.11g - or if you're looking to futureproof a bit then 802.11n adapter would do the trick.
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