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Author Topic: Methane Hydrate  (Read 2291 times)
dhaslam
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« on: February 07, 2012, 12:28:23 AM »

Not new but another large resource  of  fossil fuel, although probably only concentrated enough to use in certain areas like Northern Canada and Siberia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methane_clathrate
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Philip R
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« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2012, 01:01:49 AM »

Methane Hydrates were mentioned over a year ago on the forum. I would have to look at my past inputs to find it.

Apparantly, there is so much of the stuff under the ocean, that if it were to warm up and release to the atmosphere, it would cause a climate catastrophy. Also its quantity dwarfs all other exploited and known resources of methane and other hydrocarbons.

Where we live on the continental shelf, The UK would not possess any clathrates within our coastal waters, although we could drill the shale instead!!

Some people believe that the Bermuda triangle ship sinkings and aircraft losses are due to clathrate boil offs turning the sea to foam, thus sinking ships. The static build up, sets off lightning, which ignites the gas and depletes the local air of oxygen, thus bringing down low flying piston engined aircraft.

PhilipR
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rt29781
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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2012, 12:01:41 PM »

Methane hydrates are a deal breaker in Global warming.  Already massive increase in the methane given out as the seas warm.
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CeeBee
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« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2012, 01:34:59 PM »

Seeing as methane (CH4) is apparently much worse at being a 'greenhouse gas' than carbon dioxide (CO2), then would I be correct in thinking that if the methane was going to escape as a gas anyway, then we'd be better off burning it (result: energy + carbon dioxide + water) than just letting it escape as it is?
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rt29781
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« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2012, 02:35:03 PM »

Absolutely agree that we are better off harvesting the clathrates rather than letting it into the atmosphere, however even though methane is a potent greenhouse gas it does natuarlly oxidise to CO2 in a few years.  The issue is whether the amount of methane emitted brings on catastrophic warming that extinguishes us.....Hence the need to reduce CO2 levels pronto.
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