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Author Topic: Home grown bio-diesel  (Read 8123 times)
Contadino
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« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2012, 04:02:58 PM »

One obvious tree is an olive tree, others would be the various nuts, like hazel, almond etc. The yields per hectare from these are pittifully low iirc.

I get 300 kilos of olives - so approx 50 litres of oil - from 3 olive trees, each taking up maybe 6m diameter. There are varieties for the UK climate, but IIRC they're much smaller trees, but at the very least you'd expect 50 litres from 8 of them.

I don't beileve it's viable to grow hazels/almonds for oil. The effort that goes into growing them as a cash crop is very high.

Of course, the economics of making the oil from olives on an energy basis are fairly dubious.  If you calculate the energy required to pulp, then press to 450bar for 4 hours, then run the juice through a centrifuge, I suspect the EROEI is lousy. Rapeseed requires higher temperatures, much higher pressure, and solvents. The input prices are higher, so the processing costs are higher.
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clivejo
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« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2012, 04:29:57 PM »

To be honest Im more interested in how the diesel tree makes the oil.  What are the chemical processes which cause the fibres to store the oil, is it a by-product or an energy reserve of some sorts?
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SteveH
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« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2012, 07:33:59 AM »

 No idea how they are produced, but I suspect most of the turpines are produced as a protection against wood boring beetles & fungi... Thats how creosote works..
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guydewdney
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« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2012, 07:46:54 AM »

Western red cedar is very high in anti bug stuff - which is why they use it for bee hives - would that work? It thrives in the uk climate (well, round here anyway)
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renewablejohn
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« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2012, 11:33:27 AM »

bit of background for use of turpentine as a 100% substitute for diesel

http://www.ijest.info/docs/IJEST10-02-10-072.pdf
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julian
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« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2012, 01:57:45 PM »

Bar oil seed rape, are there any other plants/trees which will grow in our climate, for a source of bio-diesel.  I have been reading about the diesel tree (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copaifera_langsdorffii) and wondered if there are any trees like that which could be grown here?


*surely* you would do so much better growing a food crop, and then trading it for used cooking oil?

...even if that food crop is, itself, vegetable oil of some sort?

I think i read somewhere, ages ago, that the best (practical) energy collector was suger beet?  Which could then be fermented to ethanol.

But, again, i would have thought that, small scale, growing some desirable crop, and then trading for used oil would be so much more of a better idea?


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