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Author Topic: Where not to put your woodstove  (Read 12867 times)
spaces
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« on: May 09, 2012, 11:09:46 PM »

Big move, from the garden sheds to a real house - well a tin shed, albeit with a decent slate roof and beefy wooden frame. Since a tiny cottage for 30 miles in every direction is at least 250k and my wife helps run her family farm, we're having to rent and have found the cheapest going - which happens to have loads of land around it and is in an exquisite location.  extrahappy

The agent has been exceedingly helpful, good to deal with and has negotiated (with the owner - who is notoriously stingy and owns most of the valley) internal stud partition removal, a host of small details including new carpeting as well as the unblocking of a fireplace and a chimney to allow a new wood stove to be installed, with all that entails.

Inspected the newly installed stove today, to find it looks like this

BIG groan. Rang up the agent (she's tweedy - although not of tweedy stock I'd say - fairly particular and about 28 for what it matters) who agreed it was daft. She had put her concerns to the installer, a local plumber, who had told her that it would be against rules and regs to install it any differently.  hysteria

She gave me his number, suggesting I might do better. So spoke to the guy earlier on, who ignored the question regarding rules and regs, but said it was to make the sweep's life easier - among a load of other bull, then muttered he couldn't say anymore to me since it was the agent he must deal with. But he continued and said the stove had no chance of heating the room anyway (think he thought the house was intended for someone who wanted woodburner cause they're trendy in certain circles) and tried to ignore my suggestion of rear exits and t-pieces. But admitted he could see where I was coming from... and after a bit more chat suggested he'd get back in touch with the agent.

I phoned her, she was annoyed he'd suggested the stove wasn't up to heating the room (suggesting he'd advised this particular model) and even more annoyed he had given me a different reason for installing as he had. We both decided it suited him to fit it as it was, radiating most of the heat to the chimney stone.

Anyhow, given one way or another it will be coming a good way forwards, what's the best insulation for the concreted fireplace? I had it running this afternoon and after three hours the outside of the chimney (six inch stone) at stove top level was probably 35-40C (8C air temp). There's going to be about a foot and a half behind the stove and four inches or so at the side for the rearmost few inches of stove which will remain in the nook.

My thinking is sheet steel, bricks and plasterboard - with air gaps between each.
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Justme
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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2012, 08:32:46 AM »

Ask the same question on here & you will get a response from a member called Fahrenheit who knows his stuff.
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« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2012, 08:46:27 AM »

Ask the same question on here & you will get a response from a member called Fahrenheit who knows his stuff.

How do you do that thingy with the linky Justme  Huh
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« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2012, 10:05:02 AM »

Click the Quote button and it will show you the code to use.
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« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2012, 10:40:56 AM »

Inspected the newly installed stove today, to find it looks like this
I can't see what's wrong with it. I have one in a very similar situation and it works very well. I have tried it forward, out in the room and right back like it is now and to be honest, the straight flue pipe is easier to deal with and much stronger. The radiant heat still gets into the room but most of the heat is convected and as long as you have an efficient register plate, this all gets into the room too. If the bricks are warm, then they will radiate too, and for a long time after the stove has gone out.
By "fireplace" do you mean hearth? It looks like you have an adequate one.

wattever
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« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2012, 10:53:53 AM »

The way I see it, a lot of the radiated heat is going into the surrounding chimney stone which is then radiating the heat to the world outside.
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Justme
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« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2012, 12:32:30 PM »


[ url=http://www.thegreenlivingforum.net/forum/viewforum.php?f=21 ] here [ /url ]

With no spaces
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« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2012, 12:44:55 PM »


[ url=http://www.thegreenlivingforum.net/forum/viewforum.php?f=21 ] here [ /url ]

With no spaces

No, I'm fairly sure I'm a member on that board...
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« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2012, 12:51:52 PM »

On checking, I'm not. Will get on with moving house rather than signing up on to more discussion forums!
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Heinz
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« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2012, 12:52:32 PM »

The way I see it, a lot of the radiated heat is going into the surrounding chimney stone which is then radiating the heat to the world outside.

It will be. My woodstove is in a much bigger fireplace and the wall outside used to get warm to the touch, one of the many reasons why I extended the house in that direction, the warm woodstove wall is now in the kitchen  Grin
Many moons ago I had a wodstove in a static caravan which threatened to set fire to the wall. Made a simple reflector from a bit of steel sheet, curved so it would stand up by itself. The reflector was about four inches off the now cool wall. I'm sure something similar would work for you and it's cheap enough to try?
I agree the stove is far too far back but I'd try and avoid 90deg angles in the flue. Mine is straight up and the flue just about keeps itself clean, tarry stuff flakes off and falls straight into the stove.

H

PS we never did see a photo of the shedhouse  Sad
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spaces
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« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2012, 02:08:02 PM »

Thanks Heinz, was thinking of sheet steel, with bricks and air gaps behind to soak up more heat which would otherwise go into the chimney stones. Was considering a rear exit with two 45 degree bends rather than one 90 bend, but have known rear exit stoves with t-pieces and an unsrewable cap on the bottom t for access which have worked well.

We've got used to cooking on the stove top, would be good to have the flu exiting from the rear as an extra benefit. At the moment the thing is about an inch from the chimney wall at the back. It makes no sense to me.

The shedhouse is actually two sheds. The bedshed is 14x10 with the bed, wardrobe, chest of drawers and a small rocket stove in a 25 litre drum (for increased flu heat capture, flu exits towards the bottom of the drum) and is insulated with 60mm kingspan (edit: the shed, not the stove). It's smart and cosy, finished with 6mm ply. The other shed is 20x12 and is very comfortable living indeed considering it only has kitchen foil for added insulation - it sealed draughts and radiated back a bit of heat from the old French stove, making a surprising amount of difference. We were cosy right down to -16C in last winter's big freeze, using vegoil/glycerine/sawdust heat logs (in old carpet tubes) and wood for heating. The rocket stove in the bed shed runs on kindling alone and is fantastic - dismantled now as no use for it, will resurrect somewhere else.

Pics are of the bedshed, a gathering of my wife's friends in the main shed and Ralph the orphan who we're looking after - he enjoys the stove too when it's raining.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2012, 02:22:00 PM by spaces » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2012, 02:48:44 PM »

I think Ralph has just stolen all the limelight  Grin
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« Reply #12 on: May 10, 2012, 03:00:09 PM »

You're right - my terriers are very upset.
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brackwell
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« Reply #13 on: May 10, 2012, 03:07:47 PM »

I would run with Heinz. Reflective sheet of POLISHED steel curved all round the stove should work wonders. Keep it away from the brick if possible to create a very effective air gap insulation. Perhaps even a sheet angled over the top to direct convected air into the room

Ken
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dhaslam
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« Reply #14 on: May 10, 2012, 03:37:15 PM »

A big chunk of  insulation  at the back wouldn't be any harm either.     The worst thing is that the chimney will still be losing heat to outside all the way up.   It looks   wrong to have the stove so far in  and also it is in the corner of the room  where  it would be  better at an angle.  like this slightly mad version  http://oddsnendsmnr.com/woodstove.htm
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