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Author Topic: Wood burner feeding cylinder on same floor with door in the way  (Read 20907 times)
Lincsoldbird
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« Reply #30 on: October 21, 2012, 10:16:52 PM »

Hi what are you using for cooking?

If it LPG you may as well make things simple and get a instant water heater as you're going to spend more than you save in the 3 to4 year you are going to be there.

Also they need no power and heat the water you use.

Paul

PS I'm not trying to be ungreen but you're better of saving for your future place as I guess the static is not permanent
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #31 on: October 22, 2012, 07:46:35 AM »

I've got an induction hob and oven, but thankyou
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spaces
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« Reply #32 on: October 22, 2012, 02:36:25 PM »

The suggestion of an inline gas water heater maybe boring and unfashionable but it's effective and easy. I suppose it is the polar opposite of my suggestion on your other thread! But with winter approaching, I'd get a decent s/h stove installed fast for keeping you warm and heat water on top of it in the short term.
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Simplicity, the ultimate refinement
Billy
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« Reply #33 on: October 22, 2012, 04:30:16 PM »

My first one had some 1/2" copper wrapped round the flue a couple of times..   Grin

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Greenbeast
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« Reply #34 on: October 25, 2012, 11:00:10 AM »

If i have a heat leak rad plumb right next to the stove (possibly in a covered porch area on the other side of the exterior wall) that will work via gravity, can i add a pump after this and pump the circuit?

If the power is out the heat will thermosyphon through the radiator?
correct?
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Billy
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« Reply #35 on: October 25, 2012, 11:58:11 AM »

This is a difficult one and may require some sperrimentin.  Grin  I might try this:




Getting over the doorway and back is not an issue.  The heat dump must get rid of its heat in "fail" conditions and I wouldn't bother with a pump.  I don't think it will be necessary.  Take the feed to the dump from the bottom of flow pipe.  This will make sure that most of the heat is shot up.  When it can't get rid of any more heat it will start to make its way through the heat dump.  You have to pay particular attention to levels and you may have to take the feed to the dump from the side and cope with a bit of loss to the tank.  If the boiler is not too big then I reckon it will be fine.

Over the past few years I have experimented with taking feeds from differing positions on the flow pipe and have had some pretty good results without having to put valves in to restrict the flow to the rads.  I have had to play with the levels but I reckon its just fine now.  I was also paranoid about back end corrosion but things seem to be fine so far.   fingers crossed!



There used to be a shed load of info on gravity and the special fitting that were used.  It was from USA but try as I might I can't find it now.  Course that was for pipes and not copper.  I like pipe me.



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Greenbeast
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« Reply #36 on: October 25, 2012, 12:06:36 PM »

thanks mate.

I was thinking of building a crude loading unit out of valves (NO) and pipework, to keep the circuit short until up to temp
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Tombo
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« Reply #37 on: October 25, 2012, 12:19:15 PM »



There used to be a shed load of info on gravity and the special fitting that were used.  It was from USA but try as I might I can't find it now.  Course that was for pipes and not copper.  I like pipe me.



Did you mean this?

 http://www.oldhouseweb.com/how-to-advice/gravity-hot-water-heating-continued.shtml

I bookmarked it when it was mentioned on the forum previously, possibly by you...
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Billy
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« Reply #38 on: October 25, 2012, 12:27:09 PM »

I tried that when I saw the price of thermvars or whatever.  I discovered that they only really work when pumped so didn't bother.  Played with valves but when the fire is on and we need heat to the boiler it tends to be on all the time so it only heats up once.  If it's only on for a chilly evening it doesn't matter if the rest of the system doesn't get hot.  I played with it so much that I connected it up with silicone hose to make it quicker to take apart.  Ended up using it quite a lot when playing.  Fantastic stuff.



Thanks Tombo, oldhouseweb is a name I remember, it was about ten years ago when I first started to plan.  I thought it might have gone.  Brilliant.   extrahappy
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #39 on: October 25, 2012, 12:29:53 PM »

thanks for your insights
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Lincsoldbird
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« Reply #40 on: October 25, 2012, 11:21:24 PM »

Billy is that a piece of blue plastic pipe I spy on the back of your stove. That very no no, stoves have to have copper for 24ins from the fire for boat safety.
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Billy
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« Reply #41 on: October 26, 2012, 08:35:58 AM »

No no,  Grin

it's some rather good silicone.  I also use a smaller diameter to connect the solar to fixed pipe.  Copes with stagnation no problem.  I has mine on a turntable 'cause my home moves.

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Tombo
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« Reply #42 on: October 26, 2012, 09:22:11 AM »

stoves have to have copper for 24ins from the fire for boat safety.

Really? I think you'd be nuts to have any plastic in a thermosyphon  system from a wood burner.  The sound of water boiling in pipe work on a windy night is bad enough without worrying about pipes going soft and squishy.

I know some MCS Solar thermal collectors use silicon pipework internally  and are tested to stagnation temperatures so I'd have thought that was ok.

 Kudos for gimballing your stove Billy!
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