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Author Topic: DIY wood burner with boiler???  (Read 61003 times)
Greenbeast
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« on: October 17, 2012, 08:26:29 AM »

I'm a trainee bodgineer and i'm refurbing a static caravan on the cheap.
Looking to build my own wood burning stove, and if possible include a water jacket

What thoughts come to mind on possible designs and problems i might have?

Initially thinking of using an old gas cylinder (i built my first forge from one) but then a making a steel plate box from scratch might be more sensible
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biff
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« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2012, 09:17:05 AM »

Good morning Greenbeast,
                         It might be better to buy a second hand stove,something with a proven track record for efficency and safety.There are loads of different type stoves for sale,You could hardly buy the material to makeup a stove for the price you would pay for a decent secondhand one.The safety factor is the all important one and you will need,smoke alarms and fire extinguisher at each end of the static,
  This would be the one of the most important decisions,in your circumstances which needs serious consideration.
                                                                 Biff
                                                                                     
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2012, 09:36:22 AM »

Yes you could be right
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billi
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« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2012, 10:02:29 AM »

Perhaps an"ordinary" stove and a  selfbuilt heatexchanger for the flue pipe Huh

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danny stardust
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« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2012, 04:06:38 PM »

I considered incorporating a back boiler or flue heat exchanger in my log burner in the static.
But as there was only me and it being a temporary stay in the static while my house was getting certain renovation work I decided against it in the end. The van was often left unheated and uninhabited for long periods too, and any system could suffer frost damage unless it was drained down.
Also the generally lightweight structure of a caravan is not ideal for supporting a large tank. In the end for simplicity I just kept a huge pan on the stove's top surface that could be decanted for the dishes and washing when required. It also made a reasonable heat battery during the night when I let the stove go out over night for safety reasons.
It might be a fine balancing act trying to heat the large tank of water and not have the place roasting from the radiated heat of the stove.
I could heat my static from 0deg to a balmy 28deg C in just a couple of hours with stove cranked up to 11..........while the beers were chilling in the snow outside.
It is possible to cook on a stove too, so possibly choose or make one that has a decent sized flat top area. My stove had a large top surface of 13" x 25". I recall having an abundance of pans on the go once, think it was frying pan with chops, tatties boiling, cauliflower simmering,  with spinach steaming above, home made cheese sauce on the go, and a quick gravy pan squeezed on at the end (no lumps in cheese sauce or gravy by the way). It did get a tad hectic at moments, but made club DJ Carl Cox working 4 decks looks simple! LOL

But as mentioned already, fire extinguishers and at least a couple of working smoke detectors are an absolute must to have in place.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2012, 04:12:40 PM by danny stardust » Logged

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Greenbeast
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« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2012, 07:30:39 PM »

i'll likely be living there full time for 2-3 years

it'll have full kitchen and shower room and plumbing for both,
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Lincsoldbird
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« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2012, 09:52:41 PM »

Hi we have lived in a static for 6 years and I built a sedora type stove. Google it. Best thing since sliced bread.
Cost me next to nothing and does stay in for long periods. The best bit it will burn almost any thing including sawdust and shavings.
We don't have a boiler but the web sight shows one can be fitted
PS don't build it the same size as the 3000 or you will fry, scale it down in width not height.

Best of luck statics ain't as bad as people make out it just a different life style.

Paul
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dhaslam
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« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2012, 11:19:12 PM »

The Sedore looks like a good design.    It needs secondary air  at the  flue outlet which would also help water  heating  coils in the  back section.   The only thing is that the tall chimney  might be a bit difficult for a caravan.   
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knighty
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« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2012, 01:44:22 AM »




it does look quite good

but should have access to the back of it, for cleaning etc.. ?
(especially if it has a water heat exchanger in there)


EDIT: actually...

it's advertised that you can fill it to the brim, and then leave it going slow for 24 hours....  but it doesn't look to me like the wood will flow into the burn area on the right very well and/or it'll fill up with ash before that ?
« Last Edit: October 22, 2012, 01:49:07 AM by knighty » Logged
Greenbeast
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« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2012, 07:48:48 AM »

Hi we have lived in a static for 6 years and I built a sedora type stove. Google it. Best thing since sliced bread.

Best of luck statics ain't as bad as people make out it just a different life style.

Paul

Thanks i'll check it out.

TBH i'm really looking forward to it, currently sharing a house with my ex-wife and the static is on a farm in the country where my forge/workshop is, can't wait!
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2012, 08:48:48 AM »

looks interesting, any further tips on building one?

Did you use corrugated steel? anything you changed about the design?
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spaces
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« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2012, 02:23:03 PM »

Greenbeast, google "Aprovecho woodburner" - there are a couple of pdfs which are full of great info. I'll be building a rocket stove flued through an old 45 gallon drum later this year to heat a (well-insulated) garden shed, hoping to use just a bundle of sticks of kindling a day for heat to keep stored items dry. You'd ideally need a header tank connected to the mains for heating water off an uncontrolled heat source, not easy in a static. How about a cast iron bath outside, with a fire lit under it, it doesn't need be as crude as it sounds - it could all be boxed in and have a chimney away from and above the occupant, with remote controls for the air supply from within the bath! With a bit of pipe, a pump/gravity and a well-insulated cover this could also be your hot water storage and supply. Even build a small shed round it all!!  extrahappy
 
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Simplicity, the ultimate refinement
Greenbeast
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« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2012, 02:26:58 PM »

i will check that out thanks.

ha ha, nice idea, i think i'm still looking to keep things a little more civilised  Grin

hoping i can pressurise the coil as per: http://www.navitron.org.uk/forum/index.php/topic,18459.0.html
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spaces
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« Reply #13 on: October 22, 2012, 02:43:55 PM »

More civilised to have a sauna shed with hot bath than tiddling about in a caravan shower, in my book.  Cool
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Simplicity, the ultimate refinement
Greenbeast
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« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2012, 03:27:06 PM »

i'm installing a full shower room with a decent sized shower cubicle  Grin
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