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Author Topic: DIY wood burner with boiler???  (Read 61244 times)
Greenbeast
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« Reply #105 on: November 26, 2012, 10:11:21 AM »

Can someone talk to me about flues?

What dia, what height?
Double insulated? Does that need to continue above the roof?
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Heinz
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« Reply #106 on: November 26, 2012, 10:20:19 AM »

My experience tells me that 4" is too small, 47kg gas bottle stove in the machine shop with 4" flue (it's all I had at the time) is always chucking smoke out the door when filling with wood. 6" is a good size which has worked for me on assorted stoves.
Height, taller is better, more 'suck'.
Double insulated, why? Unless there is something you're trying to protect from the heat, I'd always use uninsulated to get as much heat out of the fuel as possible. Best flue I ever had was some 6" cast iron sewer pipe.
Needs to end above the peak of the roof or you'll suffer from downdraught in certain wind directions.

H
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"Do, or do not. There is no 'try' "  Yoda
Greenbeast
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« Reply #107 on: November 26, 2012, 10:29:23 AM »

Thankyou
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #108 on: November 26, 2012, 12:01:09 PM »

tips for going through the roof with single skin flue?
don't want my roof burning off.
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Billy
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« Reply #109 on: November 26, 2012, 01:18:56 PM »

I welded a 10" pipe through the roof to leave an upstand of about 2".  The flue came through this and left a 1" gap which I filled with fire rope to stop the drafts.  Steel spacers kept it central and the storm collar sheds the water over the upstand.  I also used a flat roof cone under the storm collar and over the upstand.  Belt and braces like.



I found this is a useful link too.

http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/stove-chimney-documentation/Installing-stoves-on-boats.pdf

I guess you could glue in a pipe.  On the inside where the wood ceiling is I cut circle out and used a strip of ally to make a fire stop ring.  Obviously an uninsulated flue is going to be a bit hotter.  My was fine but I did change to insulated on the outside as I got a cold spot and the clag used to build up too quickly.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2012, 01:34:27 PM by Billy » Logged
Greenbeast
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« Reply #110 on: November 26, 2012, 02:04:14 PM »

Thanks Billy
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Lincsoldbird
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« Reply #111 on: November 26, 2012, 09:49:33 PM »

Hi I've got a 4in pipe on my fire. just a pipe on the inside of the caravan to get the heat, out side there is 2meters off home made insulated flue.

The 4in pipe is old steam pipe from the scrap yard, outside 6in spiral ducting with rock wool between. These fires need a good draw.

On top off the caravan I welded a 6in collar to a plate and bolted it to the roof, then put the 6in spiral ducting over it.

We are in Linc's so the wind is cruel but still standing.

A 19kg cylinder should make a good stove, best of luck.
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #112 on: November 27, 2012, 11:28:15 AM »

yeah i think i might make up some sort of insulating collar for the roof space
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #113 on: January 16, 2013, 08:25:14 AM »

I've got the body cut down from the cylindeer and cut my lid out (finally had a play with my gas axe, it's bloody brilliant!)

I'm going to make it a bolt down lid so that i can experiment with water jackets/boilers by removing the top.

Hopefully continue working on it this weekend, this cold snap has me energised on the matter again!
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #114 on: January 16, 2013, 08:28:36 AM »

You can buy hard firebricks in all shapes and can cut them also, i'm wondering whether the baffle could be made out of 20mm firebrick that slides down slots in the walls, that way it''s replaceable but won't burn out Smiley

Thoughts?
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dan_c
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« Reply #115 on: January 16, 2013, 08:44:52 AM »

You can buy hard firebricks in all shapes and can cut them also, i'm wondering whether the baffle could be made out of 20mm firebrick that slides down slots in the walls, that way it''s replaceable but won't burn out Smiley

Thoughts?

The baffle in my Westfire Two stove is ~25mm "firebrick" and it holds up well. It rests on another firebrick at the back, and rest on a pin each side for support at the front. Overall it probably spans about 450mm at the front.
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desperate
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« Reply #116 on: January 16, 2013, 08:51:21 AM »

You can buy hard firebricks in all shapes and can cut them also, i'm wondering whether the baffle could be made out of 20mm firebrick that slides down slots in the walls, that way it''s replaceable but won't burn out Smiley

Thoughts?

My plan (if I ever get round to it) is to line the casing with thermalite blocks as they are really easy to cut and drill, and then render the inside with fire cement.

spDe

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www.jandhbuilders.co.uk

still a crazy old duffer!
Greenbeast
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« Reply #117 on: January 16, 2013, 08:54:00 AM »

Thanks!

The prototype will be all steel but when i build the real thing i think i will cast the interior in refractory cement, if i am clever enough i can leave a slot down the sides for firebricks to slide down Smiley

Just read the sedore manual (http://www.sedoreusa.com/pdf/manual.pdf) and am getting excited about cracking on again.
I'm going to forgo the secondary air to start with (as has been suggested by a couple of people), due to simplicity and also the sedore guys reckon the smoke circulates and burns off in the primary chamber.

edit: desp you got there while i was typing  Grin
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #118 on: January 16, 2013, 01:34:09 PM »

After reading the sedore manual and more fully understanding the design and operation it occurs to me that it is the width and depth that control fire size (for a given air inlet aperture.

So the best design is probably quite tall as you can load it and leave it, they quote burns times of 12-20 hours, no doubt this could be extended proportionally by making the box proportionally taller.

I'd be inclined, personally, to make the floor area smaller, for my smaller dwelling (as was mooted originally based on lincs' comments) but keep the height (thus changing the height to area ratio)

Make sense?
« Last Edit: January 16, 2013, 02:06:45 PM by Greenbeast » Logged
Greenbeast
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« Reply #119 on: January 16, 2013, 02:09:31 PM »

Also i think the corrugations might be relatively important for gasses to circulate, what do you reckon?
It'd be easier to build without them
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