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Author Topic: DIY wood burner with boiler???  (Read 61247 times)
dickster
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« Reply #120 on: January 16, 2013, 04:21:20 PM »

Two penneth worth.

Built 3 little brick walls round the back and sides of squirrel stove to act as heat store. V good.

Used cement fibre boards where flue went through roof.

Put flue pipes in upside down, enjoyed some high tar inhalation then put them in the right way up.
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Heinz
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« Reply #121 on: January 16, 2013, 11:45:21 PM »

Also i think the corrugations might be relatively important for gasses to circulate, what do you reckon?
It'd be easier to build without them

Methinks the corrugations would help with circulation but a similar effect could be had by adding a few bits of flat bar vertically on the inside for less effort than all that bending. It would also depend on the fuel. If you dump in a random heap of logs, no corrugations required. Carefully pile in logs and the corrugations become important?
The other thing is the Sedore manual states,
'As of May 1992, your furnace is approved to burn the following fuels:
Hardwood, Softwood, Woodchips, Sawdust, Wood shavings, Cob corn, Kernel corn,
Sunflower seeds, Sunflower tops, Recycled hardwood cubes, Barley, Oats, Wood pellets,
Recycled cardboard cubes, and Tree saver firewood. '

Now, if you dump in a load of sunflower seeds, the corrugations are doing nothing, so are they really vital or part of the patent, sales pitch, mystique?

H

PS why the feck would anyone burn barley, oats, etc? Is food really worth so little?
« Last Edit: January 16, 2013, 11:48:43 PM by Heinz » Logged


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Greenbeast
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« Reply #122 on: January 17, 2013, 07:42:24 AM »

good points Heinz, i did consider the random vs stacked wood idea. Definitely a good one on the more fluid fuels, because i wasn't planning on using them i didn't even think about them filling all the voids.

I'd like to get my all steel prototype running in the next few weeks if possible. That won't have any corrugations anyway.
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Brian H
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« Reply #123 on: January 17, 2013, 09:00:28 AM »

I've come across grain burners before. It seems wrong, but the ex-farm price of grain is often lower than the price of bought in fuel.
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Lincsoldbird
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« Reply #124 on: January 19, 2013, 10:46:47 PM »

Hi you burn grain that is mouldy or no use for cattle, very cheap
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #125 on: January 27, 2013, 10:10:30 PM »

Made some progress this weekend, got my cylinder 'lip' sorted as well as the baffle, added a flood internally, also tidied up the lid and started cutting the hole for the flue (lid not shown)


Next job is cut a opening for loading  and give it a door/lid
Then drill air vents and build a sliding cover Smiley
« Last Edit: January 27, 2013, 10:12:05 PM by Greenbeast » Logged
Heinz
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« Reply #126 on: January 27, 2013, 10:31:15 PM »

Looking good  Grin
'Flood' ?

H
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #127 on: January 28, 2013, 07:35:41 AM »

ha ha, floor!

Wanted a flat base to build the fire on and then the opening at the bottom is a little more calculable in terms of area (should i need to)
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Lincsoldbird
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« Reply #128 on: January 28, 2013, 11:53:12 AM »

Should work well that.

If your like me you will get it finished just in time for the summer heat wave Grin
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #129 on: January 28, 2013, 11:57:56 AM »

Yeah it wasn't lost on me that i made the most progress on a day that was brilliant sunshine....
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #130 on: January 28, 2013, 11:59:03 AM »

I just realised i've got an old copper cylinder in the yard, so i can properly play with boiler/water jacket options Smiley
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #131 on: February 02, 2013, 06:44:03 PM »

got some more work done today, lid bolted down, opening cut out, door cut out and fitted, air vent fitted.
Just got to add a flue interface (and flue) and put a port in the back for priming the flue





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Greenbeast
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« Reply #132 on: February 04, 2013, 03:12:30 PM »

lincs, i don't know if we've covered this, but how big is the opening at the bottom of the baffle?
I've currently got mine at 100, ready for an 30-50mm ash bed and then 50-70mm air gap
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #133 on: February 09, 2013, 02:17:12 PM »

finished the protoype!

Here is the firebox burning away


Here you can see in the port ive added at the rear, in the backbox


Here is s hole at the top of the backbox, flame present here and measured 715C


I expect the presence of so much flame in the back box, and in fact quite high up the firebox once it got going, is because i've fitted no fire rope yet to seal the lid and the door, also the baffle is just tacked in place, hence air can get in the top and pass aroud  the full height of the baffle to a certain extent.
I will let it burn down and add rope next, probably tomorrow now.

Overall i'm well pleased. it was easy to light by priming the flue with a newspaper fire in the back box.
Next big job is to experiment with boiler options in the back box.
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rogeriko
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« Reply #134 on: February 09, 2013, 03:01:41 PM »

This is what I use couldnt be simpler. 2 holes and mount it vertically in the back box so the flames surround it on all sides. 65 pounds on ebay (back boiler) or make one.


* smallboiler1.jpg (54.83 KB, 570x400 - viewed 1883 times.)
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