navitron
 
Renewable Energy and Sustainability Forum
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Anyone wishing to register as a new member on the forum is strongly recommended to use a "proper" email address. Following continuous spam/hack attempts on the forum, "disposable" email addresses like Gmail, Yahoo and Hotmail tend to be viewed with suspicion, and the application rejected if there is any doubt whatsoever
 
Recent Articles: Navitron Partners With Solax to Help Create A More Sustainable Future | Navitron Calls for Increased Carbon Footprint Reduction In Light of Earth Overshoot Day | A plea from The David School - Issue 18
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 6 7 8 9 [10] 11   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: DIY wood burner with boiler???  (Read 61004 times)
Greenbeast
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2319


WWW
« Reply #135 on: February 09, 2013, 03:44:06 PM »

yes, that was gonna be my first attempt, just a box of water

Logged
Greenbeast
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2319


WWW
« Reply #136 on: February 09, 2013, 05:29:34 PM »

I've added rope now, and it's woefully under 'aired' now, i practically have to have the door wide open to get a good clean flue gases ad decent heat.

So i'm thinking my air intake near the bottom isn't enough, i'll have to add more holes
Logged
Brandon
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1348



« Reply #137 on: February 09, 2013, 08:20:34 PM »

GB, give yourself the opportunity to have air inlet equal to that of the CSA of the flue when the air is wide open, you can always temper it with a slider.
Logged

changing the world, one roof at a time.

Quality is never an accident; It is always the result of
high intention, sincere effort, intelligent direction, and
skilful execution; It represents the wise choice of many
alternatives.
Greenbeast
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2319


WWW
« Reply #138 on: February 10, 2013, 01:54:52 AM »

ah ok, so I've got a 5" flue, do i need air inlets equal to that in area?
Logged
Heinz
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 795



« Reply #139 on: February 10, 2013, 09:44:10 AM »

No. Mine has a six or seven? (can't remember which) flue and the air inlet is about four inches, reduced to 1/3 of that or less for normal running. It is good to have a large intake for getting a stove going.
My house stove has an 8 inch flue and four one inch inlets. When lighting it, it helps to crack open the door a tiny bit which tells me that the four one inch inlets are a bit too small.

H
Logged


"Do, or do not. There is no 'try' "  Yoda
Greenbeast
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2319


WWW
« Reply #140 on: February 10, 2013, 09:54:10 AM »

great thanks!
Logged
mike7
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


« Reply #141 on: February 12, 2013, 07:26:01 PM »

Re air intake aperture - the taller the flue you have, the greater the draw. The greater the draw the smaller the inlet you will need - and the more energetic the inflow of air will be. The more energetic the inflow is, the more turbulence there will be in the firebox, tending to give more complete combustion. All of which means that a tall flue is a Good Thing.
Logged
Greenbeast
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2319


WWW
« Reply #142 on: February 12, 2013, 07:38:05 PM »

thanks for that, i will bear it in mind. there's quite a short flue on this version but i'm planning for much taller in my caravan
Logged
Greenbeast
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2319


WWW
« Reply #143 on: February 19, 2013, 08:13:16 AM »

I've increased the air intake and also double the flue length, (now about 3m, but does include a double 90deg)

I've built a little water jacket, it really is little, i calculated it at 750ml! Got holes drilled in the workshop wall yesterday, cylinder elevated and header tank in position.
Hoping to get some plumbing bits this week and get the boiler hooked up for a test run this weekend.
Logged
Greenbeast
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2319


WWW
« Reply #144 on: February 23, 2013, 10:38:52 AM »

having a nightmare welding up this boiler, can't get it to stop leaking!


Anyway, i've been giving thought to the boiler situation, i'm wondering if, given the boiler-in-back-box idea actually affords us another opportunity. That of choosing whether to use the boiler or not during stove use.

My thining is that one could have a moveable damper that would shift the flue gas/secondary flame to one side of the back box or the other, one side containing the boiler and the other empty and clear.
Sure they'd be some residual heating of the water even in non-boiler mode but it could be handy if the cylinder is up to temp and you still need room heat

Thoughts?
Logged
Heinz
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 795



« Reply #145 on: February 23, 2013, 07:51:07 PM »

Welding tanks etc. Prep the edges, grind off the millscale and if the steel is thick bevel the edges. Grind back the end of each weld run so the next run is overlapping the end of the previous run. If a seam has multiple leaks or the weld looks at all snortery, don't mess about adding weld on top of it, grind it all back out and do it again.

Re. the movable damper. Good idea  Grin Friend of mine has a similar setup for his open fire back boiler. Simple baffle sends the heat round the water tank or bypasses it.

H
Logged


"Do, or do not. There is no 'try' "  Yoda
Lincsoldbird
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 89


« Reply #146 on: February 23, 2013, 08:13:32 PM »

My old Esse range cooker had such a baffle, sending the heat to cooker or the boiler. Worked well enough.
Logged
Greenbeast
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2319


WWW
« Reply #147 on: February 24, 2013, 08:27:48 AM »

Thanks heinz, might have another bash today

Good to hear my idea might work. Of course i know how useful it will be. The caravan might be so well insuated that whenever it's alight i need hot water.
Logged
Lincsoldbird
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 89


« Reply #148 on: February 24, 2013, 07:46:34 PM »

I find a stick welder better than mig for tanks, being a boat builder I,ve made the odd one or two in my time.
I test mine to 5 PSI and use washing up liquid to find the leaks.
Only had one in 15 years that did not have a leak so don,t dispair.
Logged
Greenbeast
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2319


WWW
« Reply #149 on: February 24, 2013, 09:10:04 PM »

all i've got is a stick welder! Smiley

finally got it leak proof today, got it installed and fired up, took the water from 4C to 40C in 5 hours.
Bear in mind the cylinder only has 1" insulation and is sitting outside (temp 0C)

I'm trying to think how a few inches more insulation and having the cylinder at 'room temp' would affect the performance.
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 6 7 8 9 [10] 11   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!