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Author Topic: Carbon Offsetting does it really do anything?  (Read 7128 times)
pantsmachine
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« Reply #30 on: March 18, 2019, 04:59:17 PM »

I did something like this last year  when thinking eco invest with SSE shares rather than RDS when SSE announced 100% renewables going forward. God loves a tryer!
« Last Edit: March 18, 2019, 05:02:58 PM by pantsmachine » Logged

HUGE insulation depth.
5.12 kw PV system with Solar edge.
4.8 kw Pylon tech battery storage.
All Low energy bulbs.
Solar I boost charging 210 ltr OSO system tank.
Balanced & zoned CH wet system & Hive 2
Wood fired thermosiphon cedar hot tub.
Masanobu Fukuoka inspired veg garden & fruit trees
GarethC
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« Reply #31 on: March 18, 2019, 05:31:03 PM »

@Ken. I'm with ecotricity. If they didn't work to create -additional- renewable capacity, my worry would be, isn't this just -diverting- what green electricity currently exists to me (notionally) rather than someone else? And even though they do create additional capacity, my concern is what % of their profits go towards that (I'm worried that it's pretty low).

So in my head, paying into a bond (or some other scheme) where all the money contributes to renewable capacity that might not otherwise be built, it's probably more beneficial. I think...
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nowty
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« Reply #32 on: March 18, 2019, 06:09:23 PM »

Mmmmmmm that's an interesting question, my pension fund is heavily invested in Solar and Wind farms but am I carbon offsetting by investing in renewables or is the end purchaser of the low carbon energy carbon offsetting.

We both cannot be offsetting the same carbon.

Or are neither of us offsetting as we are not taking carbon out of the atmosphere like we might if we invested in growing a forest where there is not one.
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11kW+ of PV installed and 56+ MWh generated.
Lithium battery storage of 50+ kWh.
Hot water storage of 15+ kWh.
Heat storage of 15+ kWh.
6kW Ground source heatpump.
EV BMW i3 (another 30+ kWh's of storage).
260,000+ litres of water harvested from underground river.
Home grown Fruit and Veg.
Bodidly
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« Reply #33 on: March 18, 2019, 06:45:21 PM »

What's the view on (and this might already have been considered to death) investing in renewable energy projects? I. E. If I invest in an ecobond (or whatever they're called) that contributes to building an extra wind turbine, is that better?

Already have some Ecobonds and get our lecy from Ecotricity. Must admit to not considering the Ecobonds as offsetting but it probably is.

Ken. I did a couple of carbon footprint calculators but did allow for the fact out electric is from 100% renewables.
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GarethC
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« Reply #34 on: March 19, 2019, 10:29:23 AM »

Have been considering this, and I really like the idea of directly investing in renewable energy projects, via bonds etc, as a form of carbon offsetting. Unlike with buying leccy from ecotricity, I -know- all the money's going to go to adding capacity, and fairly soon. Unlike projects that plant trees or purchase low emission stuff in Africa... Well, I don't know, but I'm just now sure I trust these projects to deliver the carbon reductions promised.

I'd like to work out how much renewable energy a given investment in, say, an onshore wind turbine, could be expected to provide. Sure this option shows up in carbon offsetting calculators? Or can we work it our ourselves?
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JohnS
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« Reply #35 on: March 19, 2019, 11:43:45 AM »

Have been considering this, and I really like the idea of directly investing in renewable energy projects, via bonds etc, as a form of carbon offsetting. Unlike with buying leccy from ecotricity, I -know- all the money's going to go to adding capacity, and fairly soon. Unlike projects that plant trees or purchase low emission stuff in Africa... Well, I don't know, but I'm just now sure I trust these projects to deliver the carbon reductions promised.

I'd like to work out how much renewable energy a given investment in, say, an onshore wind turbine, could be expected to provide. Sure this option shows up in carbon offsetting calculators? Or can we work it our ourselves?

Sometimes I think that there must be a lot of double or triple counting of offsetting. 

You will count this as offsetting.

So will the guy who purchases the output from your investment.

As for biomass, I think that is the biggest con there is.  Firstly, we are waking up to the damage to our health from wood burning fires, especially open fires.  Secondly, once upon a time, all fossil fuel was biomass.  wackoold   horror  fingers crossed!  stir
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Bodidly
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« Reply #36 on: March 19, 2019, 12:16:50 PM »

Some more food for thought https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2011/sep/16/carbon-offset-projects-carbon-emissions

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brackwell
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« Reply #37 on: March 19, 2019, 03:31:57 PM »

  especially open fires, they can be negative heat with more heat escaping up the chimney than is produced when the fire is burning.  
« Last Edit: March 19, 2019, 04:04:13 PM by brackwell » Logged
wookey
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« Reply #38 on: June 03, 2019, 02:02:03 AM »

Offsetting is generally pretty dodgy. It largely takes the form of 'paying poor people to diet for you'. But if you choose your projects carefully it might be better than nothing. I find solaraid appealing as it's pretty direct replacement: kerosene -> solar LED lamps. 1 tonne/yr from kerosene replaced for 8 IIRC: https://solar-aid.org/offset-your-carbon/  But you are still getting poor people with tiny carbon footprints to lower their emissions rather than doing it yourself.

Investment in low-carbon energy is definitely a good thing. I've done a lot over the last decade (probably over 120K by now).
Abundance is a good platform: https://www.abundanceinvestment.com/
 They fund energy projects and have recently branched out into housing too.

Energy4all is also good, but have rather fewer projects these days: http://www.energy4all.org/index.php
 They specialise in community energy schemes/co-ops.

Things like ecobonds are nice and simple.

And there are good finds in wind/PV. You buy shares, but the fund is designed to pay a dividend, rather than generate share value increases:
TRIG: https://www.trig-ltd.com/
 (UK and French PV and wind)
Greencoat: http://www.greencoat-ukwind.com/
 (UK wind)
These were pioneers - there are others now.

Most of these things are not protected investments - so if it goes wrong you lose your money. Don't invest in any of this stuff if you can't afford to lose the money. Quite a few of them are long-term too: 17-20 years to get all your money back so again they are not much use if you might need the money soon. On the other hand they are great if what you want is a regular income. Rates vary from 4 to 12% generally reflecting the risk.

The big one is your pension fund. What is it invested in? It's likely to dwarf other investments.
 Try to find a fund based on something like the FTSE4good index, rather than standard trackers which tend to be fossil fuel heavy.
 Even FTSE4good is 1.1% Shell, but that's in comparison to 7% in the typical trackers.
 It's still hard to get genuinely fossil-free investments in pension-fund world, although that is hopefully changing after a load of them signed a big agreement last year at COP24.
 'Ethical' funds are doing pretty well these days (not true 15 years ago), so it's not at all hard to justify switching.

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Wookey
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« Reply #39 on: June 03, 2019, 06:37:48 AM »

That's -extremely- helpful, thank you. I was really struggling to find options that met my criteria. Essentially, I've been looking for investments that I could be confident would add to the marginal supply of renewable energy quite directly (so investments in wind and solar really), as I felt that, as long as we need to increase renewable energy generation as fast as we can, I could be most confident in the emissions benefit of the investment. But I'd really struggled. I was aware of abundance, but all their projects are things like waste to energy, about which I'm unsure.

I will look into TRIG and Greencoat. How would I find other options like this? My wife and I hope to stick a chunk of our pension funds into something like this, so hopefully at least a few tens of thousands. Every bit helps I reckon.

I'm going to try to work out how much renewable energy a given investment is likely to generate. Should be doable with a few basic assumptions of installation cost of utility scale PV or wind plus capacity factors. I -think- this form of investment should give a much better bang for your buck in terms of emissions reductions than other measures.
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Bodidly
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« Reply #40 on: June 03, 2019, 08:37:48 AM »

Great stuff Wookey. Many thanks
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nowty
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« Reply #41 on: June 03, 2019, 02:26:05 PM »

And there are good finds in wind/PV. You buy shares, but the fund is designed to pay a dividend, rather than generate share value increases:
TRIG: https://www.trig-ltd.com/
 (UK and French PV and wind)
Greencoat: http://www.greencoat-ukwind.com/
 (UK wind)
These were pioneers - there are others now.

Other quoted (stockmarket) investments are,

John Laing Environmental Assets (JLEN)
https://jlen.com/

Bluefield Solar Income Fund (BSIF)
www.bluefieldsif.com/

Next Energy Solar Fund (NESF)
www.nextenergysolarfund.com/

Foresight Solar Fund (FSFL)
https://fsfl.foresightgroup.eu/

GCP Infrastructure Investments (GCP)
www.graviscapital.com/funds/gcp-infra/about

I have a sizable chuck of my pension fund invested in all of them.
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11kW+ of PV installed and 56+ MWh generated.
Lithium battery storage of 50+ kWh.
Hot water storage of 15+ kWh.
Heat storage of 15+ kWh.
6kW Ground source heatpump.
EV BMW i3 (another 30+ kWh's of storage).
260,000+ litres of water harvested from underground river.
Home grown Fruit and Veg.
gnarly
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« Reply #42 on: June 03, 2019, 10:42:10 PM »

You can also work out how much electricity you are generating from the annual report.
e.g. Greencoat UKW say that in 2018 they generated 2003 GWh and from the market cap and share price you can then work out that each share generates 1.7kWh of electricity per year, delivered into UK grid.  It shows how efficient 'big wind' is...
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pantsmachine
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« Reply #43 on: June 08, 2019, 08:41:23 AM »

Lots of good investment ideas here. I am looking to move away a percentage of oil shares and investing more in wind & solar. Thanks lads.
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HUGE insulation depth.
5.12 kw PV system with Solar edge.
4.8 kw Pylon tech battery storage.
All Low energy bulbs.
Solar I boost charging 210 ltr OSO system tank.
Balanced & zoned CH wet system & Hive 2
Wood fired thermosiphon cedar hot tub.
Masanobu Fukuoka inspired veg garden & fruit trees
nowty
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« Reply #44 on: June 08, 2019, 02:38:13 PM »

And there are good finds in wind/PV. You buy shares, but the fund is designed to pay a dividend, rather than generate share value increases:
TRIG: https://www.trig-ltd.com/
 (UK and French PV and wind)
Greencoat: http://www.greencoat-ukwind.com/
 (UK wind)
These were pioneers - there are others now.

Other quoted (stockmarket) investments are,

John Laing Environmental Assets (JLEN)
https://jlen.com/

Bluefield Solar Income Fund (BSIF)
www.bluefieldsif.com/

Next Energy Solar Fund (NESF)
www.nextenergysolarfund.com/

Foresight Solar Fund (FSFL)
https://fsfl.foresightgroup.eu/

GCP Infrastructure Investments (GCP)
www.graviscapital.com/funds/gcp-infra/about

I have a sizable chuck of my pension fund invested in all of them.


There are also a couple of recent start up investments into Grid Battery Storage which I am also invested in.

Gresham House Energy Storage Fund (GRID)
https://newenergy.greshamhouse.com/funds/esf

Gore Street Energy (GSF)
www.gsenergystoragefund.com
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11kW+ of PV installed and 56+ MWh generated.
Lithium battery storage of 50+ kWh.
Hot water storage of 15+ kWh.
Heat storage of 15+ kWh.
6kW Ground source heatpump.
EV BMW i3 (another 30+ kWh's of storage).
260,000+ litres of water harvested from underground river.
Home grown Fruit and Veg.
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