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Author Topic: front door with low threshold step which is not good at stopping cold in  (Read 13237 times)
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« on: March 02, 2013, 08:40:11 PM »

Hi all,
A few years ago we installed a composite door with a low threshold door step instead of one of those upvc ones with the step.
All is ok with the door with exception of how seemingly bad the bottom of the door is at stopping the cold. 
The door has 3 rubber flaps at the bottom that stop the wind and cold through however unsurprisingly it still comes through.
I have checked they are in one piece and ok.   

What I want to ask is has anyone out there had the same issue and has anyone come up with a workable solution to the door draft other than putting a draft excluder across the bottom of the door.  at the mo I have one of those long old fashioned snake draft excluders.

the only possible solution I can think of is to build a small step outside which would reduce some of the cold breeze.
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biff
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« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2013, 09:33:18 AM »

Dear Ads,
          When I built our latest house over 10yrs ago,It was double glazing all around but not uvpc because I had noted how thick and ugly and insecure the uvpc frames were compared with the plain white fine alloy frames,so to me it was a no brainer.I did insist  on a nice hardwood front door,engineered with 5 point locking security and double seals around,d/g of course.This door faces directly north and this time of year get the cold winds head on.
                It seems to me and Herself that this door loses more heat than any other opening in the house,so last year,before the winter set in,I placed a sheet of 50mm kingspan right over the door opening overlapping by 100mmon either side just before we settle down for the evening.
       The difference is very noticable,yet the seals on the door are perfect and the door itself has been properly treated every 3 years,so obviously the wood on the door is the problem.You could try placing a sheet of kingspan across the opening like I did,just to see the difference it makes.
 Oh,,I did create a space to the left hand side where the sheet sits upright during the day,taking up no room,so it just moves it own width,1200mm.
                                                                                                           Biff
« Last Edit: March 03, 2013, 09:35:38 AM by biff » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2013, 09:10:32 PM »

Hi Biff,
thanks for the reply with your approach.  Like you my door faces due north so it does get the cold, right now as its blowing cold and snow so can feel that. The composite door with low rise step is much nicer than the upvc things I have seen (apart from this breeze which appears to be a design flaw) Today I have put some spare kingspan 30mm across (approx 100m)m with a fleece flopped over and thats working right now which as you said it really is noticible isnt it!   Spot on with considering the storage of kingspan during the day.  Have a small velco hook for mine. Thanks again for your reply:-) Cheers,  Ads
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dan_c
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« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2013, 11:18:30 AM »

I have a low threshold like this on my composite front door and can't say I've noticed a problem. I will double check down there tonight though as it's pretty cold and breezy here at the moment.
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djh
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« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2013, 11:34:31 AM »

Hi all,
A few years ago we installed a composite door with a low threshold door step instead of one of those upvc ones with the step.
All is ok with the door with exception of how seemingly bad the bottom of the door is at stopping the cold. 
The door has 3 rubber flaps at the bottom that stop the wind and cold through however unsurprisingly it still comes through.
I have checked they are in one piece and ok.

Low threshold doors can be troublesome because they can't compress seals as well as a regular threshold. It sounds like you have flaps that slide across the threshold rather than are compressed against a stop? If the seals still look OK, have they perhaps become stiffer than they were, because of age or the cold? That would stop them sealing as well. You can probably replace them if they do show signs of leaving gaps underneath.

Another possibility would be to add another seal. You can buy face-mounted automatic seals. Face-mounted means you just screw the seal to the face of the door instead of having to cut a rebate. Automatic means that the seal lifts up as the door opens, and presses down when it closes. There are several suppliers, but to give you an idea, you can see some examples at

http://www.lorientuk.com/products/8000-series-automatic-threshold-seals

If you do build a step outside, it would definitely be worth adding a seal that compresses between the door and the step when the door closes.
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Cheers, Dave
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« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2013, 10:14:16 PM »

hi dave,

thanks for this info, indeed the bottom of the door seals appear ok no light comes though when doing the torch test from outside in, the seal is there but clearly not as  good as would like the breeze is coming though, I tried to feel how flexible they were but thats easier said than done on the bottom of the door but im sure the cold will have made them so as its been in negative numbers for some time outside along with the windchill factor.  i recently put underlay across the bottom of the door outside to act as a deflector for the wind which made a noticible difference.   I will have a look at these facemounted seals, thanks for the ideas, its appreciated, will look at that. initially I may have to make a slight step outside with that compression seal to act as a barrier.
thanks again, ads
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