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Author Topic: Draught proofing chimney  (Read 11083 times)
sb79
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« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2014, 11:32:05 PM »

Nice stove. Is that a firebelly?

As stated previously, a new register plate with insulation is what is needed. For insulation use the nasty itchy green rockwool (isover?) which is pretty inert - you can point a blowtorch at it and it just changes colour. Don't use the ordinary yellow or orange stuff as you'll have stink when you light the stove as it will burn.

Also, I could be wrong but it looks to me as though the connector from stove pipe to liner is upside down and looks like it has silicone sealant on it? The twin walled section of the connector should be onto the liner with the single walled section into the stove pipe. And fire cement should really be used to seal the various parts together rather than silicone if indeed it is silicone....

Steve.
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gravelld
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« Reply #16 on: February 25, 2014, 11:01:38 AM »

I'll post some photos if I get the chance, but there's not a lot to look at and what I've done is ugly! What I did in the end was stuff fire rope in the middle bits around the pipe and then some left over rockwool (yep, isover) between the plate and the bottom of the old chimney, and then covering the flat part of the plate. It's not perfectly sealed but it's far, far better than before.

The difference was immediate and marked. That stove (yeah, Firebelly FB2) now heats the lounge plus the hall and upstairs. I think if left burning all day it would heat the house, although use up half the Amazon in the process.

The key for me was ROI. A new register plate would cost quite a bit of money.

Thanks for the tip on the connector, will look into that. Also looks like some of the seal between the stove and the pipe has disintegrated around the back. Should fire cement be used there too?
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gravelld
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« Reply #17 on: May 20, 2014, 12:35:22 PM »

I'm thinking of coming back to this now and installing a new register plate.

How does one do this as a retrofit job? Online, all I can see are whole register plates with a hole for the flue e.g. http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/wood_burning_stoves/Register-Plates.html .

Am I supposed to take the flue off to fit those, or cut through the plate so it's in two pieces and fit (a little like it is now, only with the correct flue hole size)?
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Ivan
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« Reply #18 on: June 16, 2014, 05:25:13 PM »

An easier, cheaper option would be to make up a small plate that just covers the centre of the existing register plate (say 9" square. Then screw this from underneath to the existing register plate using hex-headed self-drilling 'roofing' screws (one in each corner. Make up a card template or draw round something of the same diameter to work out where you need to cut the new plate.

Yes, it will be draughty with a hole here!! I speak from experience, even with a much closer fit between register plate and flue.
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gravelld
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« Reply #19 on: June 16, 2014, 05:36:02 PM »

Thanks Ivan. I was actually looking at this over the weekend.

Turns out that there's what looks like existing fireboard there already, only it doesn't cover the entire lintel. Here's the best photo I could take with all of the existing register plate removed:



There's the section at the mantelpiece-side of the inglenook towards the right-centre of that photo. You can see the screws holding in the fireboard nearer the camera.

That section makes things more difficult because it exposes another gap as well as around the flue itself. I need to fill that in. Either I can take all the existing fireboard out and replace, then fit a small sealing plate or affix new fireboard to just the gap in the lintel and seal imperfections with fire cement.

Or could fill it with expanding foam which I think is heat rated... but my foam gun nozzle is rigid and would be difficult to get it into the gap I think. Fire cement? Quite a large gap though I think... at least 10mm.

I suppose I could take off the existing fireboard for inspection... will do if it provides extra info.
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Ivan
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« Reply #20 on: June 16, 2014, 05:48:01 PM »

Is it badly constructed, or was it originally for a larger flue pipe than you have now? I did wonder for a moment whether the plates were intended to slide into place, clamped by larger washers until I took a closer look.

Sealing the gap is going to be difficult - most foams/silicones etc are going to be burnt by the temperatures. Flues will often get too hot (250-400C). There are some high temperature silicones, but they seem to set like fire cement, and this will eventually (not so long, in fact), crack and fall out. The only real solution is to use a new metal or fibreboard plate.
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gravelld
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« Reply #21 on: June 16, 2014, 06:09:11 PM »

Hey Ivan. I have zero experience of this so I'm not sure which piece you're referring to when you ask whether it is badly constructed. I moved into the house with this in place. I don't know if a larger stove used to be there. That collar you can see is connecting to the shiny chimney liner.

Yeah, I want to just fix this for good really now, I bodged it over last winter (I suppose no harm in once-a-year-or-so fire-cement top ups though).
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