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Author Topic: Navipets!  (Read 119814 times)
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« Reply #225 on: December 30, 2015, 08:23:49 AM »

Silly post and apologies for stretching the limits on the word 'pet', but we've just watched the film Jurassic World, and the following headline from the Guardian reminded me of Jeff Goldblum's line from the original film, Jurassic Park:

"I'm, I'm simply saying that life, uh... finds a way. ..."

Lion booked in for second vasectomy after partner gives birth

Mart.
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« Reply #226 on: December 30, 2015, 09:21:10 AM »

Hi Mart,
       I wondered if you disagreed with keeping Blink in her cage overnight or while we are otherwise occupied with household choirs. Cats like to roam free and cats go where they like to go.
   Then there is the security of the cage for feeding and when she is tired and wants to sleep or play her games on her own. In there she never feels intimidated by the sheer size of Diese and can retreat and go to sleep when she feels like it. The only alternative was to keep her outside through the storms and flooding. She spends the best weather outside and ranges free,yet comes when she is called.
At the moment, She seems very content and if she complains,,Diese will pop in to talk to her, which is quite often.
  This is not cage training like some folks use to train stubborn breeds of dogs but more of a stop gap until I learn enough about the subject to make a proper decision.
 I know nothing about cats or very very little. I am allergic to cats fur and have been since i was small,so this whole adventure is totally new ground for me. Mrs Biff is very taken with Blink and they connect well. Cruelty to animals is usually born out of ignorance and stupidity,more than the deliberate attempt to be cruel. Strange as it may seem, I knew three vets personally who were banned from keeping both horses and dogs, Two of them treated dogs of mine, one was 92 when she was banned and I felt a kind of sorry for her because I knew that she was no longer capable of looking after herself never mind her animals. I can only say that she was an excellent vet and no one was more surprised to read about her case in the papers than I was.
 We all have different views on how to handle things, Plu has won each round so far and I have no intention of letting her use Blink and dominate her while she founds a super colony,So i have picked a friendly farmer,the guy who has a problem with rodents in his grain store and Plu will be getting a brand new job as head of pest control on his farm as soon as I can trap her. He is keen and Plu is of the character that will suit him right down to the ground.
                                                    Biff
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« Reply #227 on: December 31, 2015, 07:54:23 AM »

Hiya Biff. To be honest, no idea about cats and cages. If she seems happy then don't worry yourself. Cats seem to like having a small safe place (like a nest) when they are young. Due to decorating coincidences we always seemed to have a 'mucky' room available each time we acquired another lost cat, so they always got locked away at night till they were older (spayed/neutered 6 months(ish)) so the older cats could still use the cat flaps, or in Flash's case, as he was a big tough feral, till we were sure he trusted us, then it was his choice to stay or go ..... he slept between Wifey and me last night, so 18 months on I think his views are clear.

Fifi the GDP is crate trained. In fact it's one of the Guide Dog requirements. Though when she gets older we are allowed to let her sleep in a basket (etc) so long as she can't wander the house, so locked in kitchen, or dog gate across kitchen door for instance. It's not that they are draconian, it's just that the dogs have to be trained for a worse case scenario, so no going up stairs, on the furniture etc in case their owners don't allow it. Of course, if their owners don't mind that's fine, but harder to train it out, than in.

She likes her crate, sometimes preferring to sleep there than in the living room with us, but again, strict rules that the crate is never to be used as punishment, it's her safe, den, place stuffed with blankets, dressing gowns and a large toy (or two) for cuddles. She only gets locked in at night, or if we leave the house (2hrs max).

Thinking about Blink's cage, I'm sure your dogs are very well behaved, but feeding her there sounds like a good idea, as cats are grazers, unlike dogs, so it's better to leave food down, but can be tricky with dogs able to clean a bowl in one mighty lick.

I reckon you should just go with the flow, if she didn't like 'crate time' she wouldn't keep coming back, and cats aren't stupid, they do seem to like the safety of a household with a dog. Territory disputes especially with un-neutered Toms that roam/patrol each night can cause cats a lot of stress, but a garden or land patrolled by even friendly dogs, tends to keep the riff raff away.

Mart.
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« Reply #228 on: January 03, 2016, 11:45:06 AM »

The weather facepalm,
                   Normally when I open our front door and set Blink down on the step, She takes off across the yard in bounds of joy. You could almost hear her shout,"Freedom" but this morning the wind blew the door back in and Blink had to struggle to get off the step. I had not realised it was so rough, So I opened the door again and set her in her cage after a dry down and a romp with the rat who has suffered terribly, His wheels and undercarriage are gone and he must be dead by now,but she still returns to make sure by giving him deadly killer bites on the back of the neck and pedaling his would be intestines out on the floor. Diese has managed to curb his excitement and his drooling is now back down to almost zero.
  On the other hand, He has taken it upon himself to remind me to let her out to play round the floor and indeed he also opened the cage door himself and let her out no less than 3 times untill he buckled the cage door,leaving it twisted in such a way that it is now very difficult for me to even open the two catches because while one works freely,the other is jammed almost solid. (You will not believe this,,,he has just sprung her again as I type this. I had forgotten to slide the difficult catch(lower one) into place.
  So there you are. Blink now free outside and Diese all shy and bashful.
 She is very bold and spoiled now and developing this stalking habit of jumping out in  front of everybody, especially Diese. I would not class her as a nuisance quite yet but she is working toward that title.
 She is without doubt an outdoor girl and is now fit and strong and well able to look after herself. I will still give her a bed for the night and good food and hopefully she will remain on good terms with us. I have no illusions that somehow,she would blend into the household and become one of the family, I am off the opinion that she will be able to do this better from outside the house,rather than inside and once the good weather comes back she should be ready to make it under her own steam with a bit of food supplement. It is fascinating watching her different modes of gene inheritances ,kick in.
 She perfects her pounce on the rat from all kinds of different angles. It was she who crushed the head after all and left the marks on the underside of the plastic throat. the skid marks of her little incisor can be seen repeatedly sliding into the main puncture hole in the throat, She is born to hunt and kill without the slightest hesitation. She cannot help it. All I have to do to catch her is roll the rat at my feet and she has to pounce on it. Just like the brown trout to the mayfly on a breezy day.
  Even different breed of dogs inherit different traits of behaviour. Not just to hunt and to track but to obey and to be biddable. Domesticated wolves stay quite tame until they reach maturity but they are very much their own boss before the 2 year time frame arrives. They will not take orders from any human unless the people involved have a hold over them,through pups and traveling outside their patch(with the pups). Domesticated Dogs go through a little rebellious stage at 8weeks. It is hardly noticeable, their little sharp teeth pull and rip at bones and bite the hand that reaches down to help and that is the time where the conditioning starts. The Shepard pup learns not to snap but to be patient while the marrow is spooned out of the big cow thigh bones.They learn the reward for patience.
  The large aggressive breeds that link to the Spitz and are more original, don,t bother with this rebellious pup streak, they just take it all in their stride. However, They have to be conditioned to handle commands before adolescence arrives because such very personal things like bones,etc will not be given up quite so readily. That is where the training comes in . They are taught to fetch, drop,leave and come to heel. The confrontation over the bone is removed and the inhibitor is gently installed. Experienced trainers and handlers look out for certain traits that signal a certain type of dog 12 months into the future. It does not always go to plan. Nothing is ever perfect. the beauty of a good dog handler is that he can mask the dogs faults and even make them disappear over time if the dog proves to be excellent in other departments.
 Lorenz wrote great stuff in "Solomon,s Ring" and "Man Meets dog" and yet again in "Upon Aggression". These books used to be my bibles on animal behavior,  Peter Neville is excellent and very down to earth. Cesar Millan "is" very good. They do not get it right every time. You have to allow for the loose cannon of insanity creeping in. It happens in dogs as well as humans.
  We would need to live several lifetimes to get it right but by then we would have got fed up dealing with the educated idiots.
 As for Blink, She is an incredible little being,full of guile and charm,who can go on the defensive,fake hurt and seconds later bound around the place like a joyful dervish. Her co-ordination is improving and she does not crash as much as she did. If she is anything like her Mam,she will be quite a handful.
                                                                    Biff
 NB, It is wrong to generalise,like I have done here. There are so many exceptions to the rule that it makes a mockery out of tables and graphs, Yet there is a basis or a starting point from which to set sail, From the singing Dhole dogs to the long legged red wolf of Patagonia,with its blood filled spongy pads for bouncing up and down after mice,not to mention the African wild dogs..
  These adaptable genes never cease to amaze us.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2016, 11:57:53 AM by biff » Logged

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« Reply #229 on: January 03, 2016, 08:57:45 PM »

Alan the Rottweiler is now about 8 months old. He's growing in to a fine young dog, he's got some puppy cheekiness of course but is extremely well behaved





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« Reply #230 on: January 03, 2016, 09:41:03 PM »

GB,
 Arn,t they the terrible lickers?
  I have never know a breed like them for licking you every chance they get.
  Very nice dog, I wish you the best of luck.
                              Biff
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« Reply #231 on: January 03, 2016, 09:49:53 PM »

Is he ever, lick lick lick, all the time!
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« Reply #232 on: January 08, 2016, 12:10:26 AM »

Blink has adapted well to her change of fortune,
                                           She has private sleeping quarters, Private toilet and a dining area with papers to cover her meal when she is finished. She gets the run of the living room in the early morning, I put her meal into her cage,she is quite happy to eat in there with the door open or closed,Then if the weather is good and not freezing,she takes off into the big world around 9ish and does not need to come in again until around dark unless it gets very stormy and bitter cold, Then I open the front door,,call her,wait a minute and then she walks in, straight up the stairs,right into the living room and into her cage to eat. Natily and Diese are timed to have their meals at the same time,so there is no horse play and games of hide and seek.
   Diese is still very taken with her but Natily is not overly keen and will steal her treats very quickly if she decides to show off and tease her with it. Diese on the other hand is mesmerised by her hunting skills and acrobatics,I think he believed that she was only visiting and not supposed to stay as long as she has and now that the penny has dropped he wants to be able to organise some kind of pecking  order which of course is not an option as far as Blink is concerned, He will tell on her when she gets up on the seats and push her off with his nose but half the time,Blink is only doing it to tease him and wind him up. They greet each other properly outside which is nice, Natily is a little indifferent but she is a tad off hand anyhow and Diese is her golden boy,so there is a nose slightly out of joint but will come OK in time.We have never allowed a cat in the house before and this time is it only on a trial basis but Blink seems to understand and has not put a paw wrong since she came in the door, no puddles or postcards,she stops her game and zooms into her cage to her toilet quarter when the need arises,,then after a bit of digging and rearranging the litter,,re,emerges and get back into the game. It takes 10 minutes to change her litter each morning and I must design and build a better system, She is 6 months old in a 2 weeks time and I am going to have to get some kind of advice from the vet. Plu is about but staying out of sight.So far so good, Hopefully we can get Blink into the spring and the good weather. She grown a lot in the time she has been in our care,
 She is one of the most entertaining little characters you could wish for and certainly brightened up Diese,s life. I have not attempted to train her or boss her but she is now showing a sense of humour and bold teasing antics which is good. She is the ultimate super sluth and her body language is classic stuff which I recognise in the old paintings by the dutch masters. There is an innocence in her that is hard to put along side Plu and one cannot help but come to the conclusion that the hard life drove Plu to the point of bitter malice. I was to expect all kinds of problems with Blink,with the mother that she had and the harsh treatment that she got from Plu but the opposite has been the case, She is well balanced and extremely intelligent. One can only wonder how that came about.
                                                       Biff
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« Reply #233 on: January 08, 2016, 09:47:49 AM »

Crate trained does not need any excuses making for it, it's the stupidity of the minds eye of a human pure & simple.

Give a dog a crate, safe, dark, large enough to turn around  & stretch & you are fine, we tend to call them the night cage & that means that they are well protected from draughts & heat loss incurred from open spaces.

Safe & preferable imho, they wander in of their own accord & snooze on the vet bedding fleece & extra's ...an often fought over space precisely because it so appreciated by  "Captain sexy-pants & the ladies".

Even in their large pen there is a cage within, large enough for 3 boxers or 4 at a grumble with the door open.

What humans need to think about is why bitches & queens look for small safe dark places to give birth in the night for & get rid of pre-conceptions, a crate is only a bad place if a rotten human makes it so!
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« Reply #234 on: January 11, 2016, 11:56:38 AM »

Crate trained does not need any excuses making for it, it's the stupidity of the minds eye of a human pure & simple.

Give a dog a crate, safe, dark, large enough to turn around  & stretch & you are fine, we tend to call them the night cage & that means that they are well protected from draughts & heat loss incurred from open spaces.

Safe & preferable imho, they wander in of their own accord & snooze on the vet bedding fleece & extra's ...an often fought over space precisely because it so appreciated by  "Captain sexy-pants & the ladies".

Even in their large pen there is a cage within, large enough for 3 boxers or 4 at a grumble with the door open.

What humans need to think about is why bitches & queens look for small safe dark places to give birth in the night for & get rid of pre-conceptions, a crate is only a bad place if a rotten human makes it so!

Quite right, ours are all crate trained and 2 of our adults still eat in theirs (to avoid GDV/bloat after meals)
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« Reply #235 on: January 11, 2016, 11:56:52 AM »

updated pack shot:

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« Reply #236 on: January 11, 2016, 11:59:50 AM »

Super photo GB.
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« Reply #237 on: January 11, 2016, 12:32:35 PM »

My god! ..& I thought we were suckers for trouble with 4 boxers (1 recently adopted)  facepalm  Grin

I guess you've seen that "island pack" off Vancouver!? ...that's a sight to behold!

Was just talking to the wife about our boy, who is still poorly, we are coaxing him along (he's happy enough) ,..but his illness will warrant (we'll want) an autopsy come his time ..more animals ought to be offered (well you pay actually) for a vet school like the Fitz to carry it out, there is not enough progress made in animal medicine & treatment without.

 
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« Reply #238 on: January 11, 2016, 01:31:15 PM »

Nice pack GB,
               But boy o boy, there is a lot of work there. Grin. We had 4 dogs for a while and I recall that it was not that much trouble because 2 were quite senior citizens and the other 2 were rather respectfull . They got along well. One moment I am thinking of getting another dog and the next I put it off because old Nat is struggling sometimes and another dog might put too much pressure on her. Blink is bad enough at teasing her but I could imagine another young dog bouncing about her and Nat not being able to tell it off,like she does Blink.
         Is the collie high up on the left to the front, wall eyed or have different colored eyes,? GB.
                                                                                     Biff
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« Reply #239 on: January 11, 2016, 01:47:52 PM »

Ha yes they are a fair bit of work that's for sure. Can't wait to move to the farm, walking them will be easier!

Yes the rotti has come along this year and 'partnered up' with the big young leonberger (front left), they're inseparable and she's young enough and big enough to give as good as she gets (and he'll never out grow her), Alan can often be found hanging off of her neck or limbs

The collie is a red merle and merles often have different coloured eyes
« Last Edit: January 11, 2016, 01:50:01 PM by Greenbeast » Logged
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