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Author Topic: Navipets!  (Read 119781 times)
Tigger
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« Reply #510 on: April 17, 2018, 08:08:28 AM »

Oh wow, Chunk really is an impressive cat isn't he.  I do hope you get him sorted and re-homed. 

We have a wonderfully friendly big old boy who at his peak was 14lbs with not an ounce of fat on him and he was neutered as a kitten, I've often wondered how big a cat he'd have made if he'd been allowed to keep his tackle.....
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« Reply #511 on: April 17, 2018, 11:25:55 AM »

Wow he is a chunky chap. Did you watch that tv prog about the adopted black panther at the big cat sanctuary on Kent? Good luck Mart hope you keep your fingers attached to your hand. We had ferral cats in France name of Hiss and Spit. They were as wild as anything we used to put out food for them but they would not let us approach. Hiss had kittens which she hid obviously food was short and she brought them out to show us. It was like a switch flipped and she suddenly decided to trust us, pick her up and look after the kittens. Over time we got her and the little ones 'done'  and from supplementary feeding they were fed daily (still living outside) and should you sit outside you would find yourself wearing cats!  Grin
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« Reply #512 on: April 18, 2018, 07:37:06 AM »

Poor ickle Chunky Munky.

He's so sad in his crate. But he hasn't shut down, he's eating all and any food left for him.

Vet's can't fit him in for a check up and 'snip' till Friday, so my neighbours and I are just feeding him in lots of little sessions following a brief chat and head touch, to win him over.

I've been scratching his chin, and fussing him almost (yep, almost!) down to his tail, and whilst he is submissive I'm still a bit nervous of him.

Managed some photos, but hard to take a good pic, whilst fussing him, and trying to keep the crate door escape route plugged with my head and shoulders, but here he is:




Got to work hard to socialise him now as aggressive ferals that can't be re-homed are dealt with on a catch - neuter - release basis, but aggressive + FIV cats ..... unfortunately ...... can't be. So lots of attention, even if he hates it at the moment, and fingers crossed that blood tests on Friday are OK.



Back to our home - Richard was supposed to be placed yesterday with his match for final training, so this week should be super sad, but he has a slight eye problem that's not uncommon with 'saggy faced' dogs like gun dogs, where his eyelid can go inside out whilst sleeping and irritate the eye all night. So he has to have some minor cosmetic surgery, and so we are stuck with him for a few extra weeks ..... hooray (about him staying, not the eye problem).
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Just call me Mart.     Cardiff: 5.58kWp PV - (3.58kWp SE3500 + 2kWp SE2200 WNW)
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« Reply #513 on: April 18, 2018, 08:05:34 AM »

Taking a photo of a black cat is hard enough, with your added challenges you did well to get such a good shot of him Smiley

Good luck with Richard's cosmetic surgery, such a shame that he has to stay with you a little longer  Grin
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« Reply #514 on: April 23, 2018, 12:43:44 PM »

So, quick update on Chunk. He's now at the rescue center, been neutered, and awaiting blood test results. He was difficult to transfer into a cat box, he tried to hide, then finally fought back out of terror when I picked him up. Managed to put a few holes in me, right through leather gauntlets.

I've been popping down to see him twice a day to fuss him (torture him, as he's so scared) and try to get him used to people. Another volunteer who appears to love and specialise in ferals has said she will take him on in her feral room at home and re-hab him. If he's FIV he can't be released, or go to a home with other cats, or be allowed out, so it all depends on him now and whether he can become a house cat.  fingers crossed!

There are two old campaigners back at the center that I haven't met before but was told I would love, and I certainly do. They are both ex-ferals, and also FIV, and had been living happily for nearly a year in a house, but the lady is moving and can't keep pets, so they are back and looking for a house they can be kept in.

I thought Chunk was big, and our old cat Hobbes (aka fat ginger) who weighed 16lbs, but this teddy bear faced bundle of joy is far far bigger, and also far far fatter, I can only guess at somewher in the low to mid 20lbs.







And at home Richard the guidedog (wanna be) has clarified who is in charge out of him and Flash.





Richard went off today for some fun and games with the trainer, then tomorrow he's having some cosmetic surgery on his slightly too baggy eyelids which occasionally fold in when he's sleeping and irritate the eyeball, so he's having a slight eyelid tuck, Back tomorrow evening, and then we get to keep him for an extra week or two, after which he leaves to be trained in house with his guide dog owner.  Cry
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Just call me Mart.     Cardiff: 5.58kWp PV - (3.58kWp SE3500 + 2kWp SE2200 WNW)
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« Reply #515 on: May 05, 2018, 09:31:50 AM »

When Harry met Sally.

So, we still have Richard as he had to have his bottom eyelids shortened as they kept going inside out at night, and giving him sore eyes. I've never heard of this before, but apparently it's not uncommon in baggy faced dogs, such as Mastiffs, Shar Peis and gun dogs. So we got to keep him for a few more weeks, and he might be going end of next week(ish).

In the meantime we'd arranged to meet Scout's GDO (guide dog owner) as we are boarding him for 2 weeks in June whilst she's on holiday. Scout was the dog we had in Oct/Nov for 5 weeks and loved to bits.

So we met up with Scout and his GDO, and also another GDO with a massive curly coated Retriever called Alfie. Instant friends.

Here are the three of them, Scout leading with Richard and Alfie in hot pursuit:



and here are Richard and Scout, with Richard doing his usual stick trick to get dogs to chase him:




Quick update on Chunk the feral bruiser. I've been visiting him every day for a fuss, but he's still terrified of human touch. His blood tests show he's not FIV, so worse case he can be released on a farm, where he will live outside and get food but doesn't have to interact more than that with humans. But yesterday he went off to the lady who specialises in making friends with ferals, so fingers crossed he'll learn to appreciate human contact and a nice safe house to live in.
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Just call me Mart.     Cardiff: 5.58kWp PV - (3.58kWp SE3500 + 2kWp SE2200 WNW)
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« Reply #516 on: May 05, 2018, 12:25:33 PM »

Great pictures Mart. i love to see them playing.
A regular joy of 'old boys early morning dog walk' is watching our various muts play thugs with each other on the beach
Any further thoughts on getting a full time dog? angel

Good luck with Chuck.  We had a feral called Spit who as the name implies her nature. Happy to eat the food put out but no more. Then one day I was sitting outside and she just came and plonked herself on my lap.  After that was as friendly as you like. Nout so queer !!
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« Reply #517 on: May 05, 2018, 07:48:35 PM »

Latest pack shot, now including a baby
From left to right:
Charley (and Robin), Betty, Frank, Norman, Hari, Alan, Maddie, Joanie, Rodney, Nessa, Tinks

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« Reply #518 on: May 05, 2018, 07:59:57 PM »

Good Lord GB,,What a handfull !!,,
                                  They all look happy and relaxed. You both have talent with dogs, Frank,s ear is still down and will probably stay that way but that is nothing. I once bought a pedigree Shepherd who had a floppy ear and the breeder told me to line it with cardboard and tape it up. It was a waste of time but it might work with his ear. Vossies ear would not rise at all, your dog,s is half up and you never know, it might work. Voss was a brilliant dog but died of a heart attack when he was 8 years old..
                                                                        Biff
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« Reply #519 on: May 05, 2018, 09:47:21 PM »

 The ear has spent some time up but the last week or so stayed down. We shall see, it certainly softens his image but perfectly matches he's temperament (massive softy).

Charley is the whizz but i am definitely getting there now I've had to train the two shepherds myself. They still both need work for different reasons, betty is focused and attentive but nervy and has confidence problems because of her start in life, Frank is a blank slate and has picked things up very well and has no confidence issues but is easily distracted still, given his age. Very rewarding though and great fun on the farm, they are kennelled on the yard and are out with me unlike the rest.
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« Reply #520 on: May 06, 2018, 07:15:42 AM »

Love it GB, love it. And you got em all to pose for the pic too, well beyond my skills.
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Just call me Mart.     Cardiff: 5.58kWp PV - (3.58kWp SE3500 + 2kWp SE2200 WNW)
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« Reply #521 on: May 06, 2018, 08:43:02 AM »

 Once they all know their sit and wait commands it's not too bad. Betty had to be put on a lead as she would wander immediately, don't get me wrong she's great at it in isolation but with any other dogs she gets nervy.
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« Reply #522 on: May 06, 2018, 11:44:17 AM »

Dog leads,
           Dog leads are like dogs , they come in all shapes and sizes. There is quite a lot of confusion in the terminology but first we will deal with the long leads. Long leads can come in various lengths from 40ft down to 10ft. The 40fter is used to calm down excited collies and the 10fter is used to control normal breeds. It is looped in the one hand and fed out between the index and the thumb with the other hand ready to apply the brake as needed.
When buying a lead like this, you need to look at the clip and the spring mechanism and check to see is it strong enough for the job. Very often there is just a silly little alloy rivet between you and your dog breaking free. Then you need to buy a lead that you can see in the dark and be able to prevent it snagging on objects. With big powerful dogs that you are getting used to, A combination of a choke chain and a haltie carefully applied is the best way forward. The choke chain or check chain should have big links, so that the dog is aware of them clicking as it tightens and he can ease the pull before he feel the pressure. Once the dog is happy with the choke chain and used to it, It can be replaced with a heavy duty combination of nylon and chain,,It can only close so much but the links still click and remind the dog to ease off the pressure.I found that certain pound shops sell a lightweight 25mm wide  load straps, bright orange ones,,some with a reflective white band up the center.These are very strong and can be adapted and have good durable clips fitted. The orange strap feeds out through the index and thumb with very little trouble. It is really important that you can see the leads in the dark. Bad things happen when you cannot see the long leads.
Extending leads are a spring loaded coil of lead that is fed out of the coil and controlled by a brake that is worked by the thumb. when the brake is released,the lead recoils back into the casing a bit like a spring loaded measuring tape with a handle. Eventually the brake mechanism sticks on or refuses to work and the thing becomes a complete liability.
  Extending leads should be avoided by people with a dog over 20kgs. they are an accident waiting to happen,,especially the ones with the black nylon cords and the dodgy brakes. I know that we all have them and that we all use them but they are dangerous and you need to avoid them if possible. Do not use them with a dog over 20kgs. Eventually you will suffer. Muzzles are good and a "must" to keep on the right side of the law but you need to be able to flick it off if you suddenly find yourself in enemy territory and your dog is being attacked by some little mutt that knows exactly what a muzzle is for. Your dog needs to trust your judgement and he will have serious doubts if you keep him muzzled when he is getting his head chewed off by some halfwit mutt. Funny enough, you will often find the attacker melting away when the muzzle drops off. Never hit of beat your dog if he is fighting. Just pull him out and gently calm him down. A lot of people that i knew carried a small bag of golf balls and a putter. I never knew them to actually play golf but they did use the putter quite frequently.It is not something that I would advise.
  The long lead hanging on the wall brings back many happy memories,,various dogs have sat looking up and wagging the tail. Angel sits regularly in front of hers, looking up at it sitting stock still.Some of these days ,,that lead will self levitate off the hook and drop round her shoulders. The best made standard dog lead that I bought recently was one out of Aldi ,the one with the ring on one end and the clip on the other approx 6ft long.3.50 euros. The handiest lead of the lot is the 15ft lead adapted from the 25mm orange load straps. It can be rolled up tight and fitted into a normal pocket while you use the standard lead. Halties are an excellent investment. Again,very often the quality is expensive carp and you can make a better one yourself. In my own case, i had to make one for Diesel because i could not get one to fit his head, I used it for only 4 or 5 months. He simply did not need it after that. He turned out to be a very responsible kind of a dog.
If you go prepared with the right lead and equipment you stand a better chance of enjoying your walk and avoiding stress.
                                                                             Biff
 NB, Over 40 years ago and to this day, People debate the use of the choke chain,,I should be calling it a check chain but that term is used on other leads in the States. It is the responsibility of the dog handler to handle his dog correctly and not abuse the choke chain. Properly used,the choke chain links send a clear signal to the dog that is easily obeyed without any upset or distress. I have never used and will never use an electric collar or sonic beepers. These are definitely cruel items. Cesar Milan does impress me. There is  no two ways about it. I know he has his troubles but he has done great work. We all make mistakes and I am no exception. Every day that goes by, we should all learn something new, we should,.

              
        
« Last Edit: May 06, 2018, 12:00:53 PM by biff » Logged

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« Reply #523 on: May 06, 2018, 05:18:21 PM »

Good thoughts biff.
We hate extender leads here, have various long lines, we have used haltis on heads when walking the original 6 on public land. Now we just walk them all off lead and carry slip leads for occasional use. My two shepherds have front loading harnesses for when we go off site (training, etc), they allow a lot of control without potentially cutting into the face.
I know there is debate about electric collars, and they are likely about to be banned, but we have a set of 6, once again from walking in public woods where the hunters amongst the pack would shoot off taking everyone else with them. We don't use them now but i think in the right hands they can be a useful and not necessarily cruel thing. Easy to abuse though
« Last Edit: May 06, 2018, 05:40:53 PM by Greenbeast » Logged
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« Reply #524 on: May 06, 2018, 06:09:15 PM »

One of my friends has what I'd call a 'friendly' choke collar for her shepherd cross. The actual collar is leather adjustable to fit the dog's neck, with a 'D' ring at either end that the leader-chain runs through. When the dog pulls the lead tight, the collar can only pull up to the limit that you set, so it will never cause the gagging that you hear from some collars. It works well and the dog never gets 'choked', only a reminder of who is in charge. In normal use it sags as slack as you set it.
I believe it is called a 'Half-check' collar.
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