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Author Topic: Double Glazing Help  (Read 2136 times)
smithy891
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« on: May 27, 2014, 12:56:55 PM »

I've got a 12 year house with the original double glazing.
I've had a thermal image/ blown door survey and this has flagged up lots of issues including draughts coming around the double glazing windows and doors. I've slowly dealing with the other issues are they are fairly cheap.

I've called out a few DD sales people and all say that the DD is poor quality and needs replacing. For 1 French door, 2 doors, 1 bay and 10 other windows I've been quoted £9-10K (DD and Triple Glazing UVPC).

Talking to other  trades people, they  think that itís a good idea to keep with the original DD and just change the window seals and re-align the doors/windows and this will make a big difference. The DD sales people say this will only be effective for 1-2 years.

So I don't know what to do. I've not had quotes as yet for seals and realigning.

Do these DD quotes seem reasonable?

Some DD companies suggest the work will take 2 days, some up to 6. One company has 1 employee and he installs all the windows on his own with just a ladder!! I'm concerned with the quality of fitting as I've heard this can be a common problem.

Any recommendations much appreciated.
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w0067814
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« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2014, 03:07:54 PM »

I'm about to replace my entire house glazing, except for one door in the kitchen which is younger than the rest (it was an extension).

I too had people say that just tweaking things would do, but they were mainly handy men, so have an interest in that option just as sales people do in new. I had already decided that new was the only way to go as there are too many things that need doing - I'm sure it would be a continual problematic maintenance thing for years to come. BAsically my windows are shot. Probably 20 years old.

The number of openings in a window, and the number of partitions determine the cost more than area. Reduce the framework and mechanics to a minimum to keep your cost down. (Also lets more light in.)

Don't be fooled by the super low U-Value & triple glazed options. Triple glazing will not attenuate sounds by more than 2 - 3 dB more than double gazing unless you have asymmetric glass thicknesses. They will reduce the heat losses, but the additional cost for the windows means that you are unlikely to come out ahead financially. Your money would be better spent adding insulation elsewhere to compensate if energy is your priority. Do your sums and decide for yourself.

I have the following:

4 off Windows measuring 1.8m wide x 1.0m tall. Full height outward opening windows at each end of approx 30% of the window span each.

1 off Window measuring 1.8m wide x 1.0m tall. Full height outward opening at one end - this time vertically opening to function as fire escape rather than horizontally opening as per usual.

1 off window measuring 1.0m x 1.0m. Single small top opening for ventilation only.

1 off full glazed frosted front door with half width glazed panel to one side.

1 off french patio doors, two outward opening doors. Approx 1.8m wide and 2.0 meters tall.

I've only got one quote in so far from a company in my village. They have a good reputation and have been trading for over 30 years.

Cost to supply and install was £3,500. These are UPVC double glazed units to exceed current regulations.

I'm actually about to get a re-quote to add in a new window which shall require an opening cut in to a bedroom wall. We'll see what that does to the cost.
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Warble
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« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2014, 04:26:27 PM »

I wouldn't believe anything a DG salesman told me. I replaced my windows on my own without a ladder about 20
years ago, with Scandinavian dry glazed timber windows which are as good as new but I still have people trying to persuade
me that I need new uPVC ones.

Timber window seals are easy to replace so why not get one window overhauled to see how well it works?
Seals do get damaged occasionally but they should last 10 years if well treated.
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brackwell
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« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2014, 04:39:16 PM »

I presume you are talking about the seals around opening windows.  Are you aware that on most opening windows they are adjustable to get a tighter seal. All the other possible draughts can be fixed with sealant.  These windows are only 12 yrs old and i would take a lot of convincing they need replacing and definetly not if a salesman told me!

Ken
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gravelld
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« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2014, 04:44:56 PM »

Yeah, which seals do you mean? Do you mean the gaskets between window and frame? Or the sealed units? Or what?
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smithy891
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« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2014, 12:26:01 PM »

Thanks for all your advice.

Just to confirm it's the gaskets/seals around the opening windows. Looks as if we also have issues with the gaskets/seals around the front, rear and french doors.  The front door is wooden/plastic. The rear and french doors are upvc.

The French doors have additional problems in that 1 of the hinges looks as if it is bent. When the doors join in the middle there is around 5-10mm gap. Also, the french door that generally remains closed - you can push the door forwards by around 5-8mm even if it is locked in position.

I've never adjusted the windows/doors to get a tighter seal. Any advice over this much appreciated.

The seals look like they've seen better days. On closing any of the windows there doesn't seem to be any resistance any more.





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gravelld
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« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2014, 12:57:15 PM »

uPVC windows and doors normally take a hex (allen) key at various points, normally around the hinges in my experience. You can adjust how they sit using these. There must be loads of YouTube videos about this. Over time all uPVC windows (that I have owned) have moved and have needed adjusting.
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brackwell
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« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2014, 01:42:20 PM »

Often the hinges and the rollers on the fastening side are adjustable. They are on small cams which can be adjusted with a small allen key.  IF the seals are shot then these are usually just propriety seals. Sounds like non of these things were adjusted in the first place.  This is relatively a small job - forget replacement.  If you are not up to it then just keep asking around and you should find someone to guide/do it.

Ken
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