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Author Topic: Forklift batteries and charger  (Read 8596 times)
billi
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« Reply #15 on: June 18, 2014, 02:19:27 PM »

Quote
I just saw in a local free ads paper a "proper" working Lansing electric forklift for 1500. Is that good value? I am guessing the battery capacity to be more than 500Ah.

assuming , that the forklift has some value and the scrap value of the (guessed) 1 ton battery is about 400 , so you spent "only" about 500-600 on a  about 30 kWh battery

If you are lucky it can last a few years (my forklift battery is about 11 years old now - 7 years in my ownership )  , and connect a  Grid tie inverter  like the Steca Grid 300  to it 200 , to feed your house during the night  or a Studer XTS 1400 800 that is much more clever than a GTI and helps the house 24 hours a day and during a power-cut ....

If you are a gentleman and would like to export all your "FiT" funded  PV to Ireland   , then get another 4000  watt PV direct connected to the battery   Grin

Billi






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1.6 kw and 2.4 kw   PV array  , Outback MX 60 and FM80 charge controller  ,24 volt 1600 AH Battery ,6 Kw Victron inverter charger, 1.1 kw high head hydro turbine as a back up generator , 5 kw woodburner, 36 solar tubes with 360 l water tank, 1.6 kw  windturbine
baker
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« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2014, 09:05:02 PM »

billi
sorry
the batteries i have are from a industrial ups
designed for standby
what the chances they last 5 years?
that would be ok with a irish blessing
baker

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billi
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« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2014, 09:24:41 PM »

oh  ... was relating to the thread starter ...

but sure irish force should be with you  Smiley
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1.6 kw and 2.4 kw   PV array  , Outback MX 60 and FM80 charge controller  ,24 volt 1600 AH Battery ,6 Kw Victron inverter charger, 1.1 kw high head hydro turbine as a back up generator , 5 kw woodburner, 36 solar tubes with 360 l water tank, 1.6 kw  windturbine
baker
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« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2014, 09:02:44 PM »

 Biff/jonsey
The ups is a
Smart ups su3000 I net with a external battery  connector at the rear
The battery is 16 x 38ah  12v batteries
The lights draw 250wph  x 8 hours in winter
Do I leave the new batteries in the ups unit or remove then as they are not the same manifacfurer
Will this work for a few years?
Baker


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baker
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« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2014, 10:13:56 PM »

 Biff/jonsey
The ups is a
Smart ups su3000 I net with a external battery  connector at the rear
The battery is 16 x 38ah  12v batteries
The lights draw 250wph  x 8 hours in winter
Do I leave the new batteries in the ups unit or remove then as they are not the same manifacfurer
Will this work for a few years?
Baker


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biff
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« Reply #20 on: July 20, 2014, 10:28:38 PM »

Hi Baker,
         16 batts @ 12volts each and each carrying 38ah = 152 ah @ 48volt configured in 4 seperate strings,Total.
        Examine the loom and follow each cable to its source. Check everything,secure every single connection,
        The anderson at the rear is a 50amp one and well able for the job but you have to bring the strings into a single heavy duty copper connections that will join all the negatives
        on one side and all the positives on the other side,well insulated from each other. Each cable coming from its string must be indentical in thickness and in length so that the draw
        and the charge is spread equally over all the batteries in the bank. Then you connect your new Anderson connector cables(single heavy duty cables) to the  above said      
       single heavy duty copper connections. When you are ready,plug the anderson into the back of the Ups.
         Just leave the UPS for a few hours before you try to start it up from cold. If it fails to boot up,don,t worry. Get your hands on a small 12 volt inverter driven off a car battery
        and plug the AC supply power cable of the SU3000 into it. Leave it for 10 mins and then start it up. The small inverter will fill the caps in the SU and you should be able to cold
        start it after that and do away with the small inverter.
        One small tip. Always switch off the UPS if in doubt before you try and boot it up. It may look dead but it could still be switched on,so switch of off properly,wait a few minutes
         Then go through the booting up sequence. UPSs need time to adjust to their surroundings, The external banks do confuse them. I have known some large ones to refuse to boot
         up unless a small internal battery module was fitted at the start of operations.
         The only way that you are going to know how long the bank is going to last is to use them for a season. You can plan all you like but you cannot really be sure how good it will
         be untill you gets the seasons out of it. After charging the batts,stick the volt meter on them and any suspect duds have to be got rid off.You can still get away with 3 strings
         or 12 batts. You just need to get it up and running before you decide to spend money on a new bank.
                                                                                 Biff
        

    
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baker
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« Reply #21 on: July 21, 2014, 02:47:28 PM »

Thankyou
Will complete next week
And see what happens
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baker
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« Reply #22 on: August 02, 2014, 07:45:22 PM »

biff
pluged in ups and was working fine when grid loss
I switched off ups and connected the battery bank,  getting 53volts on batteries
the ups is putting out 54 volts on the rear connector
when I try to power up on response/ seems dead
disconnected the bank and same /dead
but the ups is pulling 100 watts
any idea
baker
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clockmanFR
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« Reply #23 on: August 02, 2014, 08:04:34 PM »

Hi Baker, Have you done the below?

The APC Smart when starting with just batteries.
 Hold the main start button on until you hear a beep then release the start button during a beep and the UPS should start.

Some times I find that the period the start button needs to be held down varies depending on the capacitors.

Bought one last year as the owner said it would not work, when I held the start button down and awaited the beep beep and it started, the owner was gob smacked.

Normally those APC ups are reasonably bullet proof.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2014, 08:16:30 PM by clockmanFR » Logged

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« Reply #24 on: August 02, 2014, 08:20:06 PM »

whoops sorry baker have amended the 'Cold start' method.
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biff
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« Reply #25 on: August 02, 2014, 08:32:58 PM »

Hi Baker,
          One of the main things that you must not forget,it to make sure that you switch off the UPS before going through the whole rigmarole of booting it up. If say,you switch it on and then boot it up and it fails to start up,you have to switch it off properly and wait a little while to clear the brain before switching it on again and booting up.
         If the caps are empty which in your case they are not because you have got it to work,it should start,however you can drain the caps by leaving it switched on while not in use and not plugged into the mains. In a worse case scenario you can use a small 75watt x 12v car inverter to cold start it without any bother,just remember to remove the 75watt inverter before you load the UPS.
   One other thing, If the UPS has been stored in a damp place you need to bring it into a dry warm place for 24 hours before you try and start it.
                                                                                                   Biff
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baker
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« Reply #26 on: August 02, 2014, 10:12:58 PM »

biff
thanks its switched on when I held the switch on
and the battery is  led,s showing full charge
and pulling 53 watts now on standby, does this mean that the battery bank was  charged? already
where the best to place a fuse/and carrier for the bank
baker
 
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biff
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« Reply #27 on: August 02, 2014, 10:56:31 PM »

Hi Baker,
          The battery monitor on the UPS will never work correctly with the external pack.
       You could fuse each string like it is done inside the UPS with a fuse in each string ,exactly between the batteries,,2 batts either side of the fuse.
          This would cover you for any eventuality and still be as safe as possible.
                                                   Biff
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« Reply #28 on: August 03, 2014, 10:11:32 AM »

Hi Baker,

If you open up the APC UPS, (only if you know what you are doing as the Capacitors and circuitry can still hold a lethal belt!, days, weeks, months later).

Just before the internal battery wire goes to the power IC's you will see a small plastic box with a transparent window and inside a copper strip, this unit acts as the internal fuse. If your UPS is a double rail type there will be 2 internal fuses.

All my lot are 90a each, but I still use a DC MCB fuse protection between the inverter and my external batteries.

Trust this helps?
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biff
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« Reply #29 on: August 03, 2014, 02:44:24 PM »

That little transparent box does indeed house the fuse,
                                           But on the 48v APCs that I have opened the fuse is located in the middle of the string with 2 batts either side. The fuse has got a very high rating,3,000 model has a fuse of 80amps which is really much too high for offgrid use, The UPS will not be charging the Batts so if all the individual strings are fused in a similar manner the fuse can be rated much lower giving much better protection to all the equipment and UPS.
                                     Biff
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