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Author Topic: Wonderful close-ups of Rosetta's comet  (Read 29873 times)
clockmanFR
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« Reply #30 on: November 14, 2014, 06:59:12 PM »

Where is biff, when you want him?
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Everything is possible, just give me TIME.
M
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« Reply #31 on: November 14, 2014, 09:39:33 PM »

You can launch from our field. We are up at 700' so saves a bit of fuel  Grin

Great minds think alike Bo. It just could work.

Old Mock, the mechanic, I remember him well,
He once built a rocket, or so they will tell,
From an old winding engine, that he found on the dole,
It was built in the Rhonda and powered by coal.
Sing fal-da-dal-dal-dal-da-day

And when it was finished, he painted it red.
And he called it Bethanual, or so it is said,
And he took it up a mountain on a night late in June,
To get that bit closer said Morgan the Moon

Sing fal-da-dal-dal-dal-da-day


Mart.

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Just call me Mart.     Cardiff: 5.58kWp PV - (3.58kWp SE3500 + 2kWp SE2200 WNW)
clockmanFR
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« Reply #32 on: November 15, 2014, 05:07:50 PM »

Well done biff,    Shocked for getting the thing to function again.

When you get back I will buy you a Pint.!

 Grin
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« Reply #33 on: November 15, 2014, 08:41:56 PM »

I appreciate that there are better/more scientific reports on the situation, but I thought this article on Rosetta and Philae was apt, being as it's from PV magazine:

Philae sleeps, hope rests in the sun

Quote
Philae, Rosetta's spacecraft probe, has reportedly gone to hibernation in an unknown corner of the 67P comet after its secondary batteries could not be charged due a lack of solar irradiation. But all is not lost. In contrast, a whole lot has been gained.

Mart.
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stannn
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« Reply #34 on: November 17, 2014, 07:55:20 PM »

Philae left footprints as it bounced across the comet.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26571-philaes-hop-skip-and-jump-across-comet-67p.html#.VGpRAmtYCSM
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desperate
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« Reply #35 on: November 17, 2014, 08:23:27 PM »

This is a very very slightly educated guess, but it looks to me as if the Philea probe is laying on its side or maybe upside down. In the last image  from your link Stannn where they show the dust cloud, the lander and its shadow we must be looking at a resolution of a metre a pixel or better. Other than the lander and its shadow there seems to be very little other detail, it looks pretty smooth even at that resolution. Some of the other piccys we have seen seem to show a cliff-like structure but with nothing else to give us a sense of scale. I wonder if we are not looking at a cliff, or small rockface but rather an extremely close up view of the ground? There is also a theory that one of its feet is not on the ground, I bet it's poking up in the air, again indicating it could be on its side.

Boo hoo

Desp
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Ivan
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« Reply #36 on: November 18, 2014, 01:40:40 PM »

Laws of physics would dictate that it the lander hit the rotating comet and bounced off, then to an extent it will start to spin itself. Given the distance the lander had to drop down to the planet, the release would have to be awfully precise to prevent it from spinning very slowly on the way down. There's no air to blow it the right way round. I assumed they had gyroscopes to stabilise it during freefall. So far, they're not even sure where it is.
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stannn
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« Reply #37 on: November 20, 2014, 09:35:47 PM »

Listen to Philae landing.....
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26593-listen-to-the-thump-of-philae-landing-on-comet-67p.html#.VG5eO9d_vtt
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« Reply #38 on: November 21, 2014, 10:23:36 PM »

Some interesting scientific detail in that article which I hadn't read elsewhere. It's a shame that we have to wait for peer-review before any of the really interesting stuff is published. I got the impression that the scientists had deliberately censored any real data in order to satisfy their peer-review principles. Whereas I can see the reasoning for this, it would have been nice to release some of the raw data on the live coverage.
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desperate
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« Reply #39 on: November 22, 2014, 05:27:52 PM »

Some scientists do get rather over protective of "their" data, mind you I suppose if you have spent ten tears developing an experiment and another ten years waiting for it to get to its target, one would be a bit miffed if scooped in the last week or two.
Nasa and ESA had enormous problems when the Hubble Space Telescope first started sending images down. ESA instrumentation was barely allowed any recognition, the NASA logo had to be prominently displayed on all images, and above all the flight engineers were only interested in flying the thing, they wern't at all interested in the science wackoold

Philae did manage to complete its primary 60hour mission which as far as I know has sent a lot of data back that will take months to analyse, and there is some hope that it will wake up when P67 gets a bit closer to the sun fingers crossed!

Desp
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Ivan
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« Reply #40 on: November 22, 2014, 07:25:17 PM »

I'm hoping it will wake up. When you consider how far away from the sun it is, I would think there will be considerably more solar energy available, even if the duration isn't increased. Jets of steam could quite easily knock it around (especially as it isn't anchored). However, the landscape did look fairly old in most areas, so I don't imagine the comet sees catastrophic remodeling when it gets close to the sun
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knighty
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« Reply #41 on: November 22, 2014, 11:46:37 PM »

lots of interesting reading here...

#http://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/2mw5ko/we_are_working_on_flight_control_and_science/


the probe weighed 100kg on earth....
on the comet it weighs 1gram (1/20th of an ounce)

to stop it spinning on the way down / when it hit, it had some sort of flywheel fitted inside to counteract the spin.... but it was set to turn off on landing (and spin down slowly by itself)


iirc, after the 1st bounce, it took 7hours to come down and land again!
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« Reply #42 on: November 23, 2014, 12:22:18 AM »

That's more like it - really nice to see the guys on the front line talking so openly and to anyone.

I'd be very interested to learn more about the organic chemicals detected, but this looks like it's been censored for now. No doubt it will form the basis of their major publication.
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stannn
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« Reply #43 on: November 27, 2014, 03:33:02 PM »

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26612-rosettawatch-homing-in-on-philaes-resting-spot.html#.VHdDnWtYCK1
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« Reply #44 on: January 27, 2015, 03:54:48 PM »

This is from a free edition of Science Magazine.
http://www.sciencemag.org/site/special/rosetta/
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