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Author Topic: A foul wind a blowin  (Read 157450 times)
camillitech
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« Reply #1035 on: May 15, 2017, 08:14:45 AM »

Our hybrid ferry runs off XP,it does a fine job, hope it's still working. The late Steve Job was most pi55ed off when he ordered a superyacht which had a similar ICMAS (intergrated, control, management and alarm system) and he was stuck with Windoze  hysteria

Hey Tod, I once lost a slow worm in my house when I was a child. My dad caught it with a scythe whilst cutting the grass so I took it inside for recuperation. Of course it escaped and we never found it. I never saw another for fifty years until recently I was strimming and guess what, I cut one with the strimmer  Undecided methinks it died a day or two later, I did come across it the day after about 25m away but it didn't look great.

Methinks newts are like lizards Biff and actually shed their tail if it gets caught, though I only base this assumption on seeing a couple with stumps that seemed to be doing OK. They occaisionally get stuck in my neighbours ball cock!!



The day wasn't the 'wall to wall' sunshine promised, in fact it was very much 'April showers' but come the evening it was boodly amazing with a respectable 20kWh of solar and 5kWh of wind. That'll be the island of Harris way across the Minch, not often I see that at 22:00 from me laptop.



Off to the quarry now for another couple of tons of gravel  bike
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« Reply #1036 on: May 15, 2017, 09:12:04 AM »

Strewth,
        This is uncalled for, Wind and rain. We never ordered this. Totally unreasonable it is. The wind from the south west licks the water of the street and flicks it up the leg of my trousers, even the hounds are disgusted. It is utterly callous and unthinking. The worst thing is, Mrs Biff has ordered a pair of those baggy shorts, The ones with all the pockets, Khaki things, sounds messy but you see I was to wear these in the yard and get a few rays of sunshine on my pins. The shorts have not arrived yet, maybe they will be redirected to my namesake in Timbucktwon,
  Worry not dear members, I am an optimist, I see the glass totally empty,clear and shiny and waiting for a decent fill, no half way measures for me.
Yes I am an optimist. Our Turbine is milling like a hero and what ever little sunshine there are, it is going straight into the tanks and who could deny that such a thing gives immense pleasure. No ashes to empty for months on end,, My porridge was excellent.  It is the poor man,s central heating.
As for newts and slow worms, I am sure that our newts will be swimming with delight this morning. I once owned a house that had some 7 steep rear concrete steps down to a concrete drying area that held a further 2 steep steps down to a small lawn that you could swing two small cats on. The place was living with golden slow worms. My X was getting into the composter stage of our relationship and was using a large bin to deposit all kinds of household compostable goodies, like cardboard egg cartons,tea bags, etc, So out she went this morning and lifted the lid and with the lid in one hand and the compostable items in the other she let a scream, dropped the lot and ran for it. I had a cautious gawk and there on top of the lot were 3 to 4 of those slow worms. Now we had seen plenty of them before because they inhabited the areas where the soil fell away from under neath the concrete drying area. She would tell me they were totally harmless and to be very careful not to disturb them. They were protected , she said.  But that morning, I would say they probably shed their skins a bit quicker than normal.. She said they caught her unawares. Life goes on.
    Wuff breakies,,coffee and I will arise and go now and,,,,,,
                                        Biff
  Ahh About mixing concrete.  Mixing concrete is one of those jobs that once you get the hang of it, you look forward to emptying out the drum and judging the contents,,a little more or less water,,sand   gravel and it gets so satisfying when you get it absolutely right that you want to keep at it so that you will become an expert. The problem is,,,,,You are already an expert and are being lulled into the joys of working with a shovel,,,,enjoying your food,  Enjoying your sleep, the good salty Raasay air in your lungs, Getting up early and feeling good about it.
You will miss it.
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« Reply #1037 on: May 15, 2017, 10:58:51 AM »

We have slow worms here.

They deposit their young under the stones that I placed to stop lost cars reversing over the grass verge in our cul-de-sac lane.
It's very sandy here and the ants build nests under the stones so a lovely supply of eggs for the baby slows.

Once saw a grass snake chasing a frog across one of the lawns - the frog knew he was being chased and hit speeds that would win gold so got away.

Plenty of other wild life as we are on the edge of the National Trust woods - all the woodpeckers (the green ones also love ants), owls a plenty.

Put bread out onto the lawn and, within seconds, it's like a kamikaze attack with rooks, jackdaws, big crows, the 4 local magpies and the odd jay - even a pair of red kites landed the other day to have a look.

Fox has a regular round through our plot. We used to have badgers trundling about, but no more.
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« Reply #1038 on: May 15, 2017, 09:14:59 PM »

The rolling lawn..The ridge is clearly visible between the tower base and the anchor point on the far right. This was filled with good clean rubble, and two feet of topsoil all on top of approx 5ft of peat with a hard level brown  rock under neath the lot, The rock would hold the water and the peat would be susceptible to expansion/ contraction and hydraulic dynamices                                                                                                                                                    [,
                                                 Biff


Biff

Im curious about that ridge forming in your lawn and wonder if its two more general lines of settlement, one each side of the ridge.

A possible explanation for settlement being the migration of finer material into voids in the base material .
You mentioned filling up to raise the lawn and may have forgotten what you lost in the lower layers ?

We once put in a 4ft dia pipe to a sewage pumping station and then built a fine access road on top with kerbs and shiny machine laid bitmac.
The spec for big pipe required  bed and surround with 40mm single size aggregate then layers of compacted clean 'as dug' subsoil up to formation then the usual road construction.
A few months after the job was completed there was a major deluge and the silty subsoil between pipe surround and road formation got washed into the voids in the 40mm clean stone.
The road simply fell to bits. It was an unbelievable sight as some of it sank a foot or more.
Sewage pumping stations by their nature tend to be at low points in the topography so there was a lorra water showed up.
The experts got all excited and tried to blame the contractors for failure with compaction but we were able to show the clean stone pipe surround nicely infilled with subsoil.
Ever since then South West Water ( and pretty much every trench with gravel ) has specified a geotextile wrap to stop migration of finer material into pipe surround.
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camillitech
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« Reply #1039 on: May 16, 2017, 07:43:02 AM »

On the subject of concrete Biff, what can you recommend as an additive for the kind of work I'm doing, hard standing for parking vehicles, digger, dumper on. My bulider left loads of the stuff when he finished the house and I've run out. I normally use washing up liquid but he had all different types that seemed to be frost proofer, retarder, water proofer or plasticiser. All three of them seemed to make the stuff easier to work with, any tips.

Cheers, Paul
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« Reply #1040 on: May 16, 2017, 09:28:50 AM »

  Hi Paul,
        The one thing you must not do is use fairy Liquid in the concrete sh*tfan or lime,,,, or plasiciser , It BAD, velly BAD, Grin
  Even if building brick/blockwork you have to use Plasticiser and only the recommended dose per batch.
 Concrete depends on the ability of the fine pieces of grit to vary in size enough to slot in between the bigger gravel, so you would use 4 shovels of clean gravel and 2 of washed sand and 1 of cement.
That would give you a mix that should bring the fat to the top and make it workable. If you were near a builders yard and could buy the ballast already mixed it would be 8 of ballast and 1 of cement but because you are trying to work with what you have you will need extra sand and extra cement.
You only use a retarder of the weather is very hot and you have large areas to trowel smooth, It does make it a little stronger by delaying the hardening process but in your case it is better not to make it too strong, You might need to lift some of it in the future.
  Concrete is strange stuff, You can get perfect results immediately and you could be faffing about for days to find that the sand is dead and that it dries up like gypsum. If it is outside and not going to be built on, i would wash some shore gravel and sand (3 times through the mixer,fresh water each time). I am sure that you would have no bother finding pea gravel. A mix like that makes incredible concrete and as it wears,the peas shine in the light.(H,Mmm might be illegal Shocked Shocked) Add to your quarry gear to make it manageable.
                                                                     Biff

 
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biff
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« Reply #1041 on: May 16, 2017, 09:57:28 AM »

Good morning GM,
                 That ridge is a hard one to figure out. On the bottom is flat rock that slopes approx 4" in 20ft towards the bottom of the garden and the shed. There were pockets of rough river sand but the main thing was that the rain water could not sink down past the rock and the bog on top(4 to 5ft) would flood during the winter. So I drained that whole area and the level in the garden dropped, Then I trucked in a min of 50 truck loads of good clean site fill and tracked (with an EX130)  dead level. I trucked in a further 2ft of top soil over the lot. I allowed for a good 12" of further settlement,
 So I knew what was in there and for ages i was baffled. Eventually the penny dropped and I came to the conclusion that the wind turbine tower and the turbine were the only culprits available to blame.
We had a few weeks of exceedingly dry weather which exaggerated the contours. Now,I never run the turbine while it is down on the trestle and suspended from the winch cable , like i used to do but it is a bit late in the day. Still I will keep and eye on it. My Daughter was quite interested in this.
I think what is happening is that during the storms, even when the turbine is up and running, The turbine brakes and sends small tremors down the guys. The guys are anchored to cubes of concrete and by and by the right frequency transfers to the concrete cubes which are arranged around the base of the turbine @ 9pm-12pm-3am and it is the tremors that pass between these solid weights that is shuffling the top layer to the middle ridge, The anchors on either side do not have to move at all, just send the tremors or resonance and the ripple effect meets in the middle.
Now this could be a big load of cobblers or as Ms Thornberry said Boxxxxks but it is the only thing that makes any kind of sense.
                                                                              Biff
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« Reply #1042 on: May 16, 2017, 09:58:56 AM »

 genuflect

Cheers for the info Biff, it's a ready mixed stuff from the local quarry I'm using, crusher dust and 20mm chips. Every one locally seems to use it and swear by it. It actullally seems to set like concrete even without cement in it. I did the last concrete pad at 10:1 and around 150mm thick, is that too weak? Also the stuff is available in 10mm chips, which would be better? Would I get away with 100mm if I used reinforcing mesh?

Cheers, Paul
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« Reply #1043 on: May 16, 2017, 10:06:58 AM »

We have the same mix here, it's all everyone uses for hardstanding - the more you compact it the harder it gets, but it's still porous and would come up very quickly.

We only add cement to it if it's got to look "pretty"
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« Reply #1044 on: May 16, 2017, 10:25:57 AM »

 Hi Paul,
      Sounds like you are using the limestone chips,grey/blue and the dust. They use that here as well, That is pretty good gear, I have added a shovel of washed sand and got a decent mix. I would not go past 8 to 1 with the sand included in the 8.   150mm is a lot of work but remember the ground you are sitting on and have you used a whacker plate. I would not worry about it. 10 to 1 is a foundation mix and that is still pretty strong. Even if a few hairline cracks appear inn 6 months time,,it is still not going to go anywhere.
   The way to prevent cracking is to put plenty of expansion joints at regular intervals or get out the consaw and cut them later. Some guys just fire in a broad mat and level it off, then come back and set the consaw at 50mm deep, They blow out the cut with an airline and fill with mastic, When it moves with settlement you cannot see the crack because it is under the mastic. This has proved to be the best was of doing it because working with the fiber expansion joint was a time consuming headache.
 A142 will not stop it from cracking even if it is 150 mm.  If it was just to park the jeep on or the car, I would do it in 100mm and 150mm round the edge. But no less than 100mm. A digger or a 7ton truck will crack it even with loads of A142, that is where the expansion joints come into it. Good hard ground is a massive advantage.
                                                                            Biff
                                                          
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« Reply #1045 on: May 16, 2017, 12:22:57 PM »

Cheers Biff, so worth getting a ton bag of corse sand to add into the mix? It was 50 a bag here last time I bought one  Shocked When I last got it from a quarry it was only 7 but the quarry closed and there's nothing else nearby apart from the mix I get at Sconser quarry, methinks that's around 25 for a couple of tons on me trailer. I used to have a cracking two stroke Whacker given to me by a mate 30 years ago but after 20 years of never using it again I gave it to another pal. Methinks it has long since gone to the dump  Cry Twas a pure beast of a thing and you had to keep yer toes well clear of it  Grin

Paul
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« Reply #1046 on: May 16, 2017, 12:46:29 PM »

 Yup, I would get the ton bag and Keep it safe, cover it. don,t let the wind blow it all over the place.
        It does bind the chips better especially if you were making lintils or a doorstep. You can see the difference when you remove the screeds round the edges.
 One of the things about weak concrete is that even though it will not break up, it will still "wear" and in dry weather there will be more dust coming off it. You will not get as much loose dust with a good mix and when it cures ,you can seal it easier so that it will shed the water quicker and not be as liable to frosting or getting the face lifted..
 It is worth while taking that little extra care. I would not float it, Just tamp it nice and fine or smooth it and then use the stiff yard brush over it. This is where the washed sand scores high. There is nothing that will break a leg or smash a hip as quick as black ice on smooth concrete. A fall to let the surface water away is also important but I can see that you have already sorted that.
  If you fine tamp it, direct the runs with the fall so that the water can get away quickly.
                                                         
                                                                                                   Biff
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camillitech
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« Reply #1047 on: May 16, 2017, 02:46:57 PM »

Cheers Biff,

what about the chips, 10mm or 20mm? I found the 10mm easier to work with but thught the 20mm would be stronger, what's the advantages of each?

Cheers, Paul
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« Reply #1048 on: May 16, 2017, 06:18:38 PM »

Hi Paul,
     The 20mm chip would be fine, You could mix the 10mm through it ,if you liked. The bigger chip is easier on the cement. The smaller chip is easier to work with and tamp down into place.
 The smaller chip rolls before the screed easier when you are pulling back and tamping. It is really a matter of choice.
You could try 4 of 20mm + 2 of 10mm,+ 1 of sand+ one of cement. You will know when you tip it out, how good it will be. the way it plops into the barrow and spreads out.
It sounds like a load of bother but you could get a very nice stuff that would be both strong and easy to work with.
The best way to do it is to measure the water, start with half a bucket in the mixer first, then the 4 of 20mm,,then the shovel of cement,,then the 2 of 10mm and then the sand in that order, Don,t keep adding water wait till the whole lot has mixed for a few minutes, Then go again,,All told the little belle will hold the 24 sq shovels comfortably, you can bung in 32 but it will start flying everywhere even if you tilt the drum back. If you stick to the 24 you will match batch after batch, just get the amount of water in at the start and then it will not stick to the back of the drum. I found those stands dodgy. The original stands had 4 legs and even they were liable to fall over and buckle the drum. I have chewed the heads of some of the lads for hitting the drum with the shovel, after a while the open rim of the drum gets all chewed up and can give a nasty cut on the back of the hand.
                                                                         Biff
 
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« Reply #1049 on: May 16, 2017, 06:23:19 PM »

That ridge in Biffs garden made me think of something that happens in a neighbors garden.  

We live at the top of a 400ft limestone ridge. The neighbor lives about a quarter mile away down the hill about 120ft lower down the south side of the ridge.  He meticulously maintains a very nice  lawn in his back garden.  Now, when we get very heavy rain here the centre of the lawn bulges up by 2- 3 inches, i guess the bulge diameter is 20-30ft.  His house is about 50 feet away and It doesn't seem to worry him but I'd be slightly manic about it.  Is it a spring or a sink hole or what? It's related to water drainage off the hill but the lawn doesn't seem to get boggy at all?



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