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Author Topic: Infrared Heating Panels  (Read 4034 times)
kristen
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« Reply #30 on: November 08, 2018, 07:27:30 AM »

Our retrievers will happily climb into the fire place and lie there until I can smell their fur singeing ... but, yeah, come rain, snow, hail ... they will run outside the moment I open the door and aren't bothered to come back in.

We have LED Collar Lights for when they go out at night. I googled one to give you an example, but can't find the type we have (little tube with carabiner type clasp onto collar ring) as there were gazzilions of choices, everything from whole collar LED day-glow colour- which might actually be better as if my dogs lay down their little LED light can be pointing straight into the ground!
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camillitech
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« Reply #31 on: November 08, 2018, 07:40:03 AM »

LED collar, I like it, there are 20K on eBay so I'm sure I'll find one.

Cheers, Paul
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http://lifeattheendoftheroad.wordpress.com/

'Off grid' since 1985,  Proven 2.5kW, Proven 6kW direct heating, SI6.OH, 800ah Rolls, 4.75kW PV ,4xTS45, Lister HR2 12kW, , Powerspout pelton, Stream Engine turgo, 60 x Navitron toobs and a 1500lt store. Outback VFX3048 and 950ah forklifts for backup,
oliver90owner
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« Reply #32 on: November 08, 2018, 09:01:44 AM »

... and got this 150 watt ceramic infrared bulp to fit into the bulb holder , to keep the dog warm over night   costs intotal  27 Euro  for a small heater  Grin , looks good too ...


Billi

WOW!  150W! Talk about pampered pets!! I have 10W pet heater plate.  Not IR, just a 10W resistor stuck on a plate in a sealed box.  Placed under the petís bedding, presumably.  I use it in conjunction with a vivarium temperature controller to maintain my beer/cider/wine fermentations at around 18 degree Celsius.  Works a treat and rarely requires full power, even in an unheated room...  The dog sleeps nearby, but has never had any form of heating in its cage.  If it is cold it buries itself under the bedding, or if warm it sleeps on top.

Back in the farm days, we used to keep day-old chicks warm with a 250W lamp - they definitely needed the warmth for the first coouple of weeks.  Piglets were given one, too.  That may have been more powerful.  The piglets were simply encouraged to sleep away from the sow, in the first few days after farrowing, to prevent them being accidentally killed by the sow laying on them - as there was not so much room in the pigsty.

Yes, we had house dogs, but there were also collies and labrador/retrievers which slept in their kennel, outside, all year round.
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sam_cat
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« Reply #33 on: November 08, 2018, 09:03:51 AM »

Without knowing exactly what you are looking at...

Anything which turns electricity into heat is close to exactly 100% efficient. It is also a very expensive way to provide that heat.


ASHP/GSHP?

Can be considerably more than 100% efficient..
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oliver90owner
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« Reply #34 on: November 08, 2018, 09:12:33 AM »

Without knowing exactly what you are looking at...

Anything which turns electricity into heat is close to exactly 100% efficient. It is also a very expensive way to provide that heat.


ASHP/GSHP?

Can be considerably more than 100% efficient..

Not so.  Heat pumps have a COP - a measure of how much heat they can move from one side of the pump to the other, compared to the elecrical energy used.  They MOVE heat, not convert anything from one energy source to another (which cannot be better than 100% - or we would have perpetual motion)!
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sam_cat
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« Reply #35 on: November 08, 2018, 09:47:37 AM »

Without knowing exactly what you are looking at...

Anything which turns electricity into heat is close to exactly 100% efficient. It is also a very expensive way to provide that heat.


ASHP/GSHP?

Can be considerably more than 100% efficient..

Not so.  Heat pumps have a COP - a measure of how much heat they can move from one side of the pump to the other, compared to the elecrical energy used.  They MOVE heat, not convert anything from one energy source to another (which cannot be better than 100% - or we would have perpetual motion)!


Wink

I know, just being a bit pedantic (its something I am good at)... At a simplistic level they use electricity and output heat, 1kW in, (ideally) 3-4kW out. Yes, its more complex than that but ignoring the 'how' the input is electricity in these systems, and the output is heat.
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Philip R
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« Reply #36 on: November 11, 2018, 08:53:40 PM »

In a large non airtight building, like a factory, I would be looking at gas fired ambirad radiant tubes or ceramic plaques radiating at shorter wavelength IR than the radiant tubes.

These do generate heat using gas which is more energy efficient than electric heaters.

I have seen electric ir panels sold into some houses in south Cheshire. Only for the residents wishing they had kept the legacy oil fired system, on account of it much cheaper running costs.
Philip R
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kristen
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« Reply #37 on: November 12, 2018, 06:58:39 AM »

I have seen electric ir panels sold into some houses in south Cheshire. Only for the residents wishing they had kept the legacy oil fired system, on account of it much cheaper running costs.

If existing wet-system infrastructure exists I agree. We put them into offices expecting high running costs, but avoiding the significant capital cost of a (new) wet system (and nightmare if we wanted to move office partitions / radiators). Running costs have been lower than we expected.
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Griffen
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« Reply #38 on: December 01, 2018, 11:58:24 PM »

We are moving to a very small offshore island where everything has to be brought in. The cottage heating system is shot. Becoming self sufficient as far as winter heating is concerned is not an option at my age so we are looking at installing IR panels running on the night tariff  after insulating the house.  Many thanks for a great discussion.
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A.L.
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« Reply #39 on: December 02, 2018, 10:28:45 AM »

hello,

We are moving to a very small offshore island where everything has to be brought in. The cottage heating system is shot. Becoming self sufficient as far as winter heating is concerned is not an option at my age so we are looking at installing IR panels running on the night tariff  after insulating the house.  Many thanks for a great discussion.

If you intend to heat during the day the cheapest single rate tariff would be better. If you want to heat at night and attempt to store the heat for daytime then cheap oil filled radiators fro Aldi/Lidl would be just as effective and considerably less capital spend.

Are you going to insulate with external wall insulation to preserve your ability to store heat in the walls etc?, do you have enough heat storage capacity in the building after insulation to use only stored heat on most days?
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kristen
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« Reply #40 on: December 02, 2018, 02:02:43 PM »

We are moving to a very small offshore island where everything has to be brought in. The cottage heating system is shot. Becoming self sufficient as far as winter heating is concerned is not an option at my age so we are looking at installing IR panels running on the night tariff  after insulating the house.  Many thanks for a great discussion.

The Far Infra red Panels we have heat "you" (and surfaces) and not the air, per se (the air heats later, after conduction), so you feel warm, being heated by IR, even if air temperature is not very warm. Thus I don't think a suitable candidate for running in house "unattended" at night.

You could get a small panel and try it to see if you like the heat (i.e. when the room is cold and the panel is pointing at you).  We have these under desks where people's feet are cold (because their desk blocks the direct path of IR from heater in ceiling to their feet). Can't find suitable one on Amazon - smallest is around 1KW and we have smaller than that under-desk - probably 350W - 1kW are change from 40-quid.

For E7 don't you need whatever the modern equivalent of "night storage heaters" is? parent had them when i was a kid, full of thermal bricks that stored the heat from Nightly-charge until the following evening.
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