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Author Topic: 80+ Plantinum power supply  (Read 9232 times)
Tinbum
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« on: January 31, 2015, 11:43:38 AM »

I have a computer running 24hrs a day and wanted to reduce it power usage so bought one of these power supplies.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/400W-Seasonic-Platinum-SS-400FL2-PSU-92-Eff-80-PLUS-Platinum-Full-Modular-/121534079476?

I could have done with out all the fancy packing and a lower price but it came with a 7 year guarantee. I'm quite amazed at the reduction in power usage- about 130w or about 3kWh a day. It will take a couple of years to pay for itself but I bought it more to help my batteries out in the dark winter months
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Nickel2
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« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2015, 03:01:15 PM »

The important thing is definitely the efficiency of the unit. Each module in your confuser will only draw the amount of power that it wants regardless of power supply, and reflect that power requirement back as current drawn from the mains.
I am still torn between buying a new monitor, (LED - 200 or so), and staying with my existing good-quality Iiyama vision-master pro. (CRT, likes electricity, bought it 10+ years ago, never go wrong until tomorrow morning,  Wink ).
What amazes me is the power drain for a modern 48" LED telly, some of them 60W or less.
 I have set the processor speed to clock-down during idle-time to reduce power, but the whole thing is still the hungriest beast in the house.
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nominous
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« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2015, 01:01:52 PM »

Look into under volting as well for energy saving.

The efficient PSU's are great but be wary of over sizing as some are not as good as you might thing when under low loads.

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mespilus
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« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2015, 01:40:12 PM »

Yes,
I also sat on my hands as led tvs became available,
relying upon an old (ca 2002 notional widescreen 21 inch crt Samsung
bought for about 170 from the John Lewis High Wycombe 'Returns section').

As more and more tv was broadcast for widescreen, I was unable to see at a glance
the top banner with abbreviated names & scores in sports programmes.

Finally succumbed to a 48 inch Toshiba, dumb tv/screen,
just checked the Energy sticker on the back: '44W' consumption.

The Samsung crt is 75W, so getting on for 4x as energy intensive.
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Countrypaul
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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2015, 03:09:29 PM »

Yes,
I also sat on my hands as led tvs became available,
relying upon an old (ca 2002 notional widescreen 21 inch crt Samsung
bought for about 170 from the John Lewis High Wycombe 'Returns section').

As more and more tv was broadcast for widescreen, I was unable to see at a glance
the top banner with abbreviated names & scores in sports programmes.

Finally succumbed to a 48 inch Toshiba, dumb tv/screen,
just checked the Energy sticker on the back: '44W' consumption.

The Samsung crt is 75W, so getting on for 4x as energy intensive.

How do you get 4x just out of curiosity? the screen is about 1/4 of the area and the power consumption nearly half so almost 8x by my calculation.

I too had a 21" CRT until 2013, then a 25" CRT hand down, and finally bought a LG 42" LED in January 2014 (both the CRTs expired) and also found I could read the scores on sport programs again!
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RIT
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2015, 05:48:16 PM »

Look into under volting as well for energy saving.

The efficient PSU's are great but be wary of over sizing as some are not as good as you might thing when under low loads.



That's the reason for the 'Plantinum' designation as it indicates that even at just 20% load it has at least 90% efficiency.

The best are those with a 'Titanium' designation as at 20% load they are rated at 94% and have a certificated rating of 90% for 10% loads. So far I've only seen reports of this standard being used in PSUs of 1500W+, which are designed to support many high end graphics cards.

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Why bother? - well, there is no planet B
mespilus
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« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2015, 07:59:01 PM »

'Twas just a quick lunchtime look-in,
and,
my arithmetical powers deserted me.

Not wishing to exaggerate the advantages of led/lcd over crt,
48/21 and 74/44 both, each approximated to 2,
forgetting the diagonalisation of tv screens.

A quick measure gives 
crt 16 3/4 by 12 1/2 or  209.375
led/lcd 41 1/2 by 23 1/2  or 975.25 a ratio of 4.66

power 44/75 = 0.59

or 7.94 which is pretty much on the nose of your value of 8.
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gravelld
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« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2015, 09:44:26 PM »

Your best bet is to go with more modern motherboard chipsets and processors. Intel et al have put a lot of effort into this in recent years. My server idles at 45W. Obviously shutting down storage etc also important.

Efficient PSUs are great but it's also a proxy for general build quality of the PSU I find.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2015, 10:31:49 AM by gravelld » Logged
jonesy
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« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2015, 10:15:58 PM »

I'm quite amazed at the reduction in power usage- about 130w or about 3kWh a day. It will take a couple of years to pay for itself but I bought it more to help my batteries out in the dark winter months
I'm quite amazed too. If changing a psu has saved 130W, what was it drawing before? My desktop takes 120W including the screen, although I rarely use that as the more powerful laptop takes 30W.
What are you using to measure the consumption.  if you are running off battery then both the efficiency and the power factor become important.  CFLs generally have a poor PF, so a 11W actually costs you say 22VA at the battery on some I've measured.  Not noticed it being too bad on power supplies, but they don't try too hard to fix PF on the cheaper ones.
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RIT
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« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2015, 10:59:30 PM »

I'm quite amazed at the reduction in power usage- about 130w or about 3kWh a day. It will take a couple of years to pay for itself but I bought it more to help my batteries out in the dark winter months
I'm quite amazed too. If changing a psu has saved 130W, what was it drawing before? My desktop takes 120W including the screen, although I rarely use that as the more powerful laptop takes 30W.
What are you using to measure the consumption.  if you are running off battery then both the efficiency and the power factor become important.  CFLs generally have a poor PF, so a 11W actually costs you say 22VA at the battery on some I've measured.  Not noticed it being too bad on power supplies, but they don't try too hard to fix PF on the cheaper ones.

Its quite common, you can purchase a 500w PSU for less than 10 (often these come as part of low cost case bundles), but its low draw usage efficiency could be below 60%. So on a low power system or one with a variable power draw there could a lot of loss. These units can also have very high draws when the system is in standby mode, I've had units drawing 40w in standby.

As noted by gravelld noted newer parts allow much lower power systems to be built. I have a Quad core 3.4Ghz Xeon server system running that draws 23w when idle (peaks at 84w). One of the ways in which I managed this was to use a nano psu. This uses an external 12V power block and can provide up to 160w to my system.
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Why bother? - well, there is no planet B
gravelld
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« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2015, 10:32:27 AM »

Yes, also server class components (like Xeon) tend to be lower drawers of energy because data center owners require it.
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Tinbum
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« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2015, 11:38:20 PM »

I'm quite amazed at the reduction in power usage- about 130w or about 3kWh a day. It will take a couple of years to pay for itself but I bought it more to help my batteries out in the dark winter months
I'm quite amazed too. If changing a psu has saved 130W, what was it drawing before? My desktop takes 120W including the screen, although I rarely use that as the more powerful laptop takes 30W.
What are you using to measure the consumption.  if you are running off battery then both the efficiency and the power factor become important.  CFLs generally have a poor PF, so a 11W actually costs you say 22VA at the battery on some I've measured.  Not noticed it being too bad on power supplies, but they don't try too hard to fix PF on the cheaper ones.
Initially it was measured with a simple plug in adapter but this actual reduction figure comes from the reduction in the power using a calibrated energy measuring device off the openenergy forum on the phase it is running on. The plug in unit showed 270w using the old 900w PSU. The computer has a 16 channel cctv video camera board with plenty of cooling fans and 6 hard drives. The office isn't quite as warm now though, but its not used that often.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2015, 11:45:42 PM by Tinbum » Logged

85no 58mm solar thermal tubes, 28.5Kw PV, 3 x Sunny Backup 5048, 3x Sunny Island 5048, 2795 Ah (135kWh) (c20) Rolls batteries 48v, Atmos wood gasification boiler, Brosley wood burner, 2000lt buffer tank and 250lt DHW
gravelld
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« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2015, 02:06:59 PM »

What sort of HDDs? The "green" lines tend to use a fair bit less. How are they used, is it possible to shut them down?

900w is one beefy PSU.

270w is an awful lot by modern standards for a headless box.
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