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Author Topic: Giant pencil sharpener  (Read 10725 times)
charlieb
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« on: September 28, 2015, 09:31:09 AM »

How to make one? 

 I've just had a few thousand 4 foot stakes cut using our own larch by a friend with a woodmizer. They're for tree planting (I stick in several hundred in most years; probably more this coming year as I may finally apply for a grant.)     At the moment I've rigged up a little table saw - see photos for bodge (it's a BnQueue handheld job rigged up on heavy vice)  - to A) cut the 8 or 12 ft lengths into 4 footers and B) to put a spike on the end.       It doesn't actually take all that long, but it's pretty boring, sends sawdust into my eyes, and more to the point if I do many thousands like this it's only a matter of time till I manage to trip and fall onto the rotating blade.   

Any thoughts on how to bodge a better/safer way to A) cut the stakes in half or B) sharpen the ends???






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desperate
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Backache stuff!!


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« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2015, 09:38:23 AM »

Get it up at a sensible working height and clear the floor of rubbish would be a start, better still get a proper table saw fight

OK if you are doing just a few your bodge might be ok, but you say "thousands"  you are pushing your luck.

I've seen at first hand the devastation a skill saw does to someones hand..............I never ever want to see that again.

Take care,

Desp
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Justme
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« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2015, 09:44:36 AM »

You can get giant pencil sharpeners for just this job.

Search for "fence post peeler pointer"
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biff
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« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2015, 10:32:20 AM »

Charlieb,
        That is a serious dangerous set up. If you were asked to design a working area that would inflict terrible injuries on a person,you would be hard pushed to beat that set-up.
      Get half a dozen scaffold planks and screw them together with runners under neath, so that your saw is in the middle and that you can move about freely.
    Your health depends 100% on your footwork but anyone can still make a mistake. So a simple  rail above the saw at Approx 900mm ,a simple square right around would also make it easier for you to
     steady up the timbers as the entered the saw. If you slipped of lurched forward the rail would save you.
    I am thinking that you want the saw at a low elevation so that you and get more leverage on the ends of the timbers , however you will perform better at proper working height.
   Working on a level surface, means that you do not tire as quickly and you have more confidence.
    You would need to make the changes now and not wait any longer.  good luck,
                                                Biff
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dhaslam
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« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2015, 11:30:05 AM »

A pair of angle grinders fixed at an angle might do the job. 
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renewablejohn
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« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2015, 11:43:51 AM »

One of these would be handy



Cannot believe he is not wearing engineers glasses or ear protectors.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2015, 11:48:43 AM by renewablejohn » Logged
billi
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« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2015, 12:06:10 PM »

http://www.bsjw.ch/index.php?id=26



just had a gooogle look  cause use a few stakes myself ...    and found this swiss website with strangest  woodworking tools

for the small stakes u use in your pics , i would not even bother to point them ... just predrill a hole in the ground with a crowbar ..

billi
« Last Edit: September 28, 2015, 12:08:52 PM by billi » Logged

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djs63
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« Reply #7 on: September 28, 2015, 04:52:21 PM »

One Navitron mantra is insulate, insulate, insulate and another could be

BE SAFE, BE SAFE, BE SAFE

whether it be saw, axes, electrics... etc.  It is good that people ask for advice though!
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djs63
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« Reply #8 on: September 28, 2015, 04:52:51 PM »

One Navitron mantra is insulate, insulate, insulate and another could be

BE SAFE, BE SAFE, BE SAFE

whether it be saw, axes, electrics... etc.  It is good that people ask for advice though!
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charlieb
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« Reply #9 on: September 28, 2015, 05:54:16 PM »

One of these would be handy

Very true. But no hope of getting one of them in the short term.

I will focus on improving my existing disc saw set up for now. (It was planned as temporary bodge while I checked it would work, but it might get permanentised a bit quicker after reaction here!).     Yes, upping the height will improve things (albeit making the action more difficult as you note Biff) and I will rig up a guard of some sort - RJohn, what I'm doing is pretty much exactly what that Posch video shows towards the end, though on a square stake.    Flat ground is one of those nice-to-have things that often isn't possible though. Definitely not here. surrender          I might look into grinders too though.  Do special disks for softwood exist?


Incidentally, I was chatting to our local fencer the other day.  He said small diameter (young) tree strainers are a bad idea, so those debarker/sharperner machines might not be as tempting as initially thought.  Anyway, as Bili noticed my stakes are only 1 1/2 inches across.  I gave up on using individual saplings years ago after getting RSI slicing the ends off with my machete. (And having occasionally taken a bit of thumb off too.)     

Bili, I've tried bashing these stakes in unsharpened and it works if the ground's very wet but not 90% of the time.  And carrying a crowbar around for pre-drill every time I stick in a tree would be way more hassle than safe-ifying this saw setup -  I like just grabbing a few trees/tubes/stakes each time I'm walking around the place.
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Bodidly
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« Reply #10 on: September 28, 2015, 07:43:06 PM »

They look like quite lightweight sections so wondered if a few blows with a billhook might prove quicker and safer.
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guydewdney
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« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2015, 08:43:19 PM »

small stakes, so do they need 4 way sharpening or would just 1 chop do it?


you have a death machine there, and im pretty lax with safety standards.....
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mike-b-
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« Reply #12 on: September 28, 2015, 09:00:05 PM »

Nearly lost my thumb cutting timber this way. Saw was in a bench vice waist height switch taped in the on postion. a&e said i was bloody lucky signofcross they could not stitch because it ripped it to bits. And they had to clean it out with a nail brush i kid u not. Took about 10 weeks to heal. 30 years ago i was 14. still hurts when its cold. freeze
« Last Edit: September 28, 2015, 09:01:39 PM by mike-b- » Logged

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mike-b-
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« Reply #13 on: September 28, 2015, 09:13:01 PM »

Oh and a very distinctive thumb print.
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« Reply #14 on: September 29, 2015, 06:26:45 AM »

I'd also recommend a nice sharp billhook! After all, they don't need to be super-pointy and if they're less than 2" diameter you wouldn't be removing much wood with each blow.  I'm sure you can find a convenient tree stump that's at the right height to make life easy...

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