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Author Topic: Giant pencil sharpener  (Read 10723 times)
Tombo
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« Reply #15 on: September 29, 2015, 06:43:39 AM »

Yes - a billhook and waist high chopping block would be twice as fast, quieter and safer.  If you like to live dangerously [and are male] you could always play billhook roulette at the same time as sharpening the stakes. 
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renewablejohn
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« Reply #16 on: September 29, 2015, 08:26:24 AM »

Should really not encourage you but my kindling saw is a heavy duty large diameter angle grinder mounted underneath an ex pub dining table with a tungsten steel chop saw blade. You also need an appropriate spacer washer as the blade and angle grinder shafts are different diameters. It works very well but be warned it will snatch the timber at times so always keep hands well away from the blade and never cross hands in front of the blade.
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jotec
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« Reply #17 on: September 29, 2015, 08:59:39 AM »

I use a stock knife for all sharpening. Very effective silent and pleasant to use. I made mine. If an image Google will show lots. Also called a clog knife. They are very versatile for stock removal and much more accurate than a side axe.
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Aiming to reduce dependency on 'mains energy'. Own bio for 120k miles, solar water heating (DIY),  CHP done, Solar PV, use wood cut from own trees.
In U.K. near Worcester
gravyminer
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« Reply #18 on: September 29, 2015, 11:09:48 AM »

charlieb
if its for tree planting does the stick not sit in the hole you dug to get the roots into the ground ?

Otherwise sharp billhook or hand axe as you go.

Always happy to see how dangerous we can make things but accept that guardian angels occasionally have tea breaks
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charlieb
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« Reply #19 on: September 29, 2015, 04:13:35 PM »

Thanks again for all the safety chat folks!    (particularly Renewable John)     All much appreciated (and will be acted on!) but it does make me wonder, and conclude, that that the set-up I photographed is a lot safer than most tree felling work that is done with a chainsaw (I recently completed my chainsaw felling and felling medium trees course), or most actions to switch attachments on old tractors. Anyway, that's a separate discussion. 

Bill hooks and variants have all been tried.  Yes they work, but doing any more than a few tens at a time is simply not feasible. It's a bit like axes and hydraulic log splitters:  yes, a good axe with good technique is quicker for the first half hour but I don't believe anyone who says they'll split more in a day by axe than with a proper hydraulic splitter.   I want to move up from planting  few hundred trees a year to planting several thousands and putting spikes on by hand is not feasible.  (Incidentally if anyone's considering it, I would advise you NOT to use sapling poles cut directly from ash coppice - they rot much quicker than these larch or bought stakes. However it is MUCH cheaper (and more satisfying) to use your own bandsaw ct stakes.    One big larch provided all these thousand+ stakes; if it hadn't been used for this it probably would have rotted or gone for firewood.) 

GM, I use cell grown trees. Makes planting MASSES easier.  But even if I was using bare-rooted plants the stake needs to be driven in deeper than the hole to have any chance of staying up for the 5-6 years it's needed.  (The roe-deer round here have learnt to push against the tubes until the stake breaks!)
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billi
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« Reply #20 on: September 29, 2015, 05:28:14 PM »

there  are those plaining discs for circular saws  to  ..... not sure if it would fit your saw ......



https://www.tecparts.com/haus-hof-stall-und-forst/forst/forst-und-holzbearbeitung/holz-saegen/kreissaegen/kreissaegeblaetter-und-zubehoer/widl-schaelblatt-chromstahl-p445877
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jotec
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« Reply #21 on: September 30, 2015, 09:07:38 AM »



 (Incidentally if anyone's considering it, I would advise you NOT to use sapling poles cut directly from ash coppice - they rot much quicker than these larch or bought stakes. However it is MUCH cheaper (and more satisfying) to use your own bandsaw ct stakes.    One big larch provided all these thousand+ stakes; if it hadn't been used for this it probably would have rotted or gone for firewood.)  


When you need some more try coppiced sweet chestnut, it lasts ages.
I was using our chipper shredder yesterday and it occured to me that if the chipping shoot was modified or replaced with one at the appropriate angel it would be perfect for sharpening stakes. It is a small petrol job that does upto about 2" diameter chipping.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2015, 09:18:23 AM by jotec » Logged

Aiming to reduce dependency on 'mains energy'. Own bio for 120k miles, solar water heating (DIY),  CHP done, Solar PV, use wood cut from own trees.
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djh
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« Reply #22 on: September 30, 2015, 11:36:08 AM »

I had a bunch of ash and chestnut stakes that I left outside for nearly a year. Most of the ash was useless - full of woodworm - while the chestnut was good as new.
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billi
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« Reply #23 on: September 30, 2015, 12:01:07 PM »

... i installed  some  chestnut paling fence , pretty good stuff  genuflect ,  i wounder  if one could get the single sticks loose , so not knitted  into a wire  .....

nice little tree stakes  whistlie .....




but sure larch is  very good as well

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1.6 kw and 2.4 kw   PV array  , Outback MX 60 and FM80 charge controller  ,24 volt 1600 AH Battery ,6 Kw Victron inverter charger, 1.1 kw high head hydro turbine as a back up generator , 5 kw woodburner, 36 solar tubes with 360 l water tank, 1.6 kw  windturbine
charlieb
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« Reply #24 on: September 30, 2015, 04:43:32 PM »

Not much sweet chestnut round here (se scotland). I did start planting a few.a couple of years ago though. I hadn't thought about coppicing them. Nice to know that's an option - especially as my friend with the band saw is threatening to retire soon.
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jotec
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« Reply #25 on: September 30, 2015, 05:48:54 PM »

I have acces to 7 acres. It is cropped in a 7 year rotation, 1 acre a year. It doesn't need sawing as it cleaves straight. I use a froe and a cleaving break in the wood. It is a wonderful way to spend a winters day working in the wood. A sort of step back in time. Most of my chestnut goes for fencing and gates.
A quickly job to keep the dog in.

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Aiming to reduce dependency on 'mains energy'. Own bio for 120k miles, solar water heating (DIY),  CHP done, Solar PV, use wood cut from own trees.
In U.K. near Worcester
gravyminer
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« Reply #26 on: September 30, 2015, 06:37:37 PM »

GM, I use cell grown trees. Makes planting MASSES easier.  But even if I was using bare-rooted plants the stake needs to be driven in deeper than the hole to have any chance of staying up for the 5-6 years it's needed.  (The roe-deer round here have learnt to push against the tubes until the stake breaks!)

Useful info. Thank you.
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charlieb
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« Reply #27 on: October 01, 2015, 10:33:54 AM »

Nice job Jotec.  I'm keen to see how the 30 or so sweet chestnut I've planted get away in the first couple of years.  If we'll I'll consider planting a bit more.  I love the idea of some coppice land that would actually be uesful.  And I quite agree about getting out in the woods working. I use a chainsaw a lot these days, but I still love getting to know the woods and seeing individual trees come one.    Does chestnut make decent firewood too?  (We sell logs and that's always the backstop use for broadleaves, except for the few standards that could get sawn)
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Bodidly
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« Reply #28 on: October 01, 2015, 12:23:45 PM »

Sadly chestnut is not great firewood. It's very slow to dry and burns reluctantly. It will just char if burning slowly but does go if working the stove hard. Chucked some in with a load to one of our best customers and they said don't bring me any of that yellow rubbish again. On the other hand I have some new to woodburning customers who have been perfectly happy with it but I have not let them have any of the "good stuff" yet  whistlie.  It took over two years to get some billets below 20%. On the upside it is delight to process and falls apart at the sight of a splitting blade.
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charlieb
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« Reply #29 on: October 01, 2015, 03:53:06 PM »

Thanks beau. Well worth knowing. (Several years off though. By that time we'll hopefully have much more storage space).
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