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Author Topic: [PDF] Ultra-capacitor Assisted Battery Storage for Remote Area Power Supplies  (Read 1510 times)
fourfootfarm
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« on: November 30, 2015, 11:37:48 PM »

Found this PDF which made for interesting reading for those wishing to try something a little out of the norm.

http://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/11039284.pdf

Basically using a bank of ultracapacitors to smooth demand form the batteries and thumb your nose a peukerts law.

As for cost benefit analysis I have no idea.

Would suspect benefits tail off as you go to higher battery voltages as you'd have inherently less amp draw and need many more caps.

They are being used in stop-start systems for cars though which is an idea for one application anyway.
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Outback FM60. EPsolar 30a MPPT and a bunch of Tristar 45's. Hodge Podge of solar ~ 4500w. Various generators and 1000ah 24v forklift battery.

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dan_b
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« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2015, 11:01:18 AM »

This is where my A level physics knowledge completely fails me - supercapacitors. How do they work?  What are they good for and what are they bad at?
I keep reading how they're going to be the next big thing in storage but they do sound a bit sci-fi and always feel like they're going to be here in 50 years time, like useable nuclear fusion!
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fourfootfarm
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« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2015, 12:45:09 PM »

Hi Dan,

They work by being made of sponge so having much greater surface area than your standard cap. This comes at a cost of voltage though. Most commonly available super caps are only rated to 2.7v which means you'd have to hook a fair few of them together to get any useful output.

You can get cheap standard caps in upto 100v flavour pretty easily but they are lacking in capacity.

The main issue is that compared to a battery they have very poor energy density, but they can kick out a serious amount of amps and recharge very quickly too.

My thinking was using them for demand smoothing on your inverter. When the pump for your refrigerator kicks in the caps could take the lions share of the amp surge protecting your batteries and letting them do what they're good at. I appreciate if you have a really nice inverter it probably does this already.
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Outback FM60. EPsolar 30a MPPT and a bunch of Tristar 45's. Hodge Podge of solar ~ 4500w. Various generators and 1000ah 24v forklift battery.

Turkish Turnip
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