navitron
 
Renewable Energy and Sustainability Forum
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Anyone wishing to register as a new member on the forum is strongly recommended to use a "proper" email address - following recent spam/hack attempts on the forum, all security is set to "high", and "disposable" email addresses like Gmail, Yahoo and Hotmail tend to be viewed with suspicion, and the application rejected if there is any doubt whatsoever
 
Recent Articles: Navitron Partners With Solax to Help Create A More Sustainable Future | Navitron Calls for Increased Carbon Footprint Reduction In Light of Earth Overshoot Day | A plea from The David School - Issue 18
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Is the Soladin 600 noisy?  (Read 8687 times)
Paulh_Boats
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2795



« on: February 06, 2008, 08:44:57 PM »

There is a You Tube video (in Dutch) with a comment suggesting the Soladin 600 is noisy. Is that true?




cheers
Paul
Logged
Ian
installers
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 317


« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2008, 08:46:17 AM »

Paul, the Soladin 600 has a small, temperature controlled, variable-speed fan inside the casing.

When the unit is not working very hard, the fan does not rotate and the unit is all but silent (a bit of hum but not intrusive). As the input stages heat up, the fan starts to rotate and the perceptible noise level starts to increase. At full bore, the fan is much more noisy than it needs to be.

As the unit is not environmentally protected, it needs to be installed inside. They have tried to "design" the case so it looks pretty and put flashing lights on it to make it more "fun" - so they think it would be OK in a domestic environment. Personally, I would not have it in the main living area of my house - much too noisy when driven at more than about 250 watts.

I hope this helps.

Regards,
Ian
Logged
Paulh_Boats
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2795



« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2008, 11:24:27 AM »

Ian,

Thanks that is very helpful as I never knew it had a fan. I'm thinking of installing it in the cupboard under the stairs where we have our freezer. We leave the door ajar to keep the cupboard cool and could close it if necessary.

It may even be possible to build a small waterproof enclosure on the other side of the cupboard wall at the side of our house. I have already decided that would be a good place to keep batteries outside the house as short cables could connect to inverters/chargers in the cupboard and all the wiring and equipment could be hidden.

Do you know if the SunnyBoy designs are quieter? I might be able to stretch my budget and I would have reserve capacity in a 1100W model.


Also how does the noise level compare to a PC or laptop fan?

cheers
Paul
« Last Edit: February 08, 2008, 05:43:51 PM by Paulh_Boats » Logged
Ian
installers
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 317


« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2008, 05:51:03 PM »

Paul - The Sunny Boy range is an altogether better range of inverters. If your budget can stretch to it - that is the way to go. I have installed numerous SMA inverters and have yet to have any go wrong; in comparison, I have had one Soladin 600 DOA and 2 others develop faults after some service time.

The small Sunny Boys are, I think, passively cooled and therefore silent but for a very small amount of hum. The larger Sonny Boy units are fan cooled but a lot less noisy than the Soladin 600 at full bore.

In addition, all the Sonny Boys are IP65 external weather conditions rated (except for the ONE that is designed for internal installation) so can be closer to the power source. Another plus is the Sunny Data software which is strides ahead of the Soladin 600 offering in sophistication and communications.

I suspect installing the Soladin 600 in the cupboard under the stairs alongside a freezer could generate a bit more heat than you might think - so an external placement would probably be a better bet.

I hope this helps.

Regards,
Ian
Logged
billi
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 8830



WWW
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2008, 07:20:29 PM »

Paul

the sunnyboy  isnot much more monney  or am i wrong ?

and nearly double the output if wanted
Logged

1.6 kw and 2.4 kw   PV array  , Outback MX 60 and FM80 charge controller  ,24 volt 1600 AH Battery ,6 Kw Victron inverter charger, 1.1 kw high head hydro turbine as a back up generator , 5 kw woodburner, 36 solar tubes with 360 l water tank, 1.6 kw  windturbine
Paulh_Boats
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2795



« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2008, 09:28:22 PM »

Billi,

Soladin 600 about £400, max 550W   Sunny Boy about £775 about 1100W max

So you sort of get what you pay for, power wise.

Ian,

Great info, thanks. My current PV is 560Wp so thats right on the limit of the Soladin. Its an odd mix of 2x180W Evergreen, 2x64W Unisolar and about 12 ex-equipment 6W panels.

My background is electronics and I have designed a wiring plan to almost balance the Imp currents. (2x64W in parallel + 180W + 180W = 75V,  with the 12 small panels sprinkled around to balance the current flow).

The problem is that the Evergreen panels have a peak current of 6.9A, which is too high for the Sunny Boy 700,,,but the 1100W model needs at least 140V and I don't have enough panels!

I was planning for the Soladin 600 which goes up to 8A in the 45-125V range, which is ideal for my panels which I picked up for £2.50/Wp on average. So on balance the Soladin is the best entry point for me. As for faults I can fix the power related ones like blown transistors.

cheers
Paul
« Last Edit: February 08, 2008, 10:12:52 PM by Paulh_Boats » Logged
Ian
installers
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 317


« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2008, 08:42:09 AM »

Paul - Agreed, The Soladin is probably best for you at the moment - based on your existing panels.

Prepare to be a little bit disappointed with your overall power output. Mixing different panels in a string never delivers what you expect it to under UK insolation conditions. Try to parallel as much as possible with the aim of providing just enough voltage to start the inverter from each string. In the end this will give you more annual power output even though you will restrict the PEAK output (either from panel configuration or inverter envelope).

If you do multi-string, then think about installing a fuse or blocking diode into each of the strings to mitigate against the very small likelihood of a reverse current flow.

I hope this helps.

Regards,
Ian
Logged
billi
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 8830



WWW
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2008, 08:57:17 AM »

Paul

If its the same sunny boy it costs here 580 punds sterling or 779 euros



http://cgi.ebay.de/SMA-Sunnyboy-SB-1100-ENS-ESS-Wechselrichter-PV-Solar_W0QQitemZ200165409308QQihZ010QQcategoryZ125067QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQtrksidZp1638.m118.l1247QQcmdZViewItem

regards Billi
Logged

1.6 kw and 2.4 kw   PV array  , Outback MX 60 and FM80 charge controller  ,24 volt 1600 AH Battery ,6 Kw Victron inverter charger, 1.1 kw high head hydro turbine as a back up generator , 5 kw woodburner, 36 solar tubes with 360 l water tank, 1.6 kw  windturbine
Paulh_Boats
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2795



« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2008, 09:09:44 AM »

Ian,

Thanks - good advice. Yes its will be tricky matching the peak power points as they vary with isolation. But to some extent that is the fun bit of the project as I picked up some of the panels at a bargain price 50% below cost  Smiley which ultimatly reduces my payback time. So losing 10% I can live with.

I can try parallel and series/parallel combinations. I also have a Soladin 120 which has worked very well with my two Unisolar 64W panels .....so Frankenstien is taking shape  Grin

Billi,
Ahh! thanks for the ebay link.
Logged
Alan
Guest
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2008, 02:26:54 PM »

Soladin 600.
Yes it is noisy. Mine is in the boiler house so not a problem. I would not like the intermittent fan noise in doors.
The electronic / printed circuit board design is well thought out but the software is very unpredictable. Mine spends a lot of its time not connected to the grid. I think they have gone over the top with trying to interpret the G83 guidelines. The remote serial link and computer software for data logging is also very hit and miss. Every time you boot the logging program it for gets what day it is, im surprised they donít bug fix that one.  That said it is a very well made nice bit of kit.

The Windy Boy 6 K.W. inverter.
Homer Simpson could have designed the printed circuit board and the electronics much better than the manufacturer. It is well known with I.G.B.T. mosfets that consideration on gate input design is required to limit parasitic triggering of the device. They could not have fitted the IR 2113 High / low gate drivers in a more remote location from the fet inputs. Then they run the printed circuit board tracks right though the high voltage / high current series / parallel capacitor banks. I have given up totally trying to keep it running, the fets and drivers have been changed twice now, in the manual it flashes a message along the lines of. If this keeps being displayed then contact the manufacturer. No mention about be aware there could be a horrendous bang any second.. A total redesign is required that uses two I.G.B.T. modules instead of the eight individual fets with the gate triggering problems just waiting to happen, also they have used 20 electrolytic capacitors with all the associated printed circuit board interconnection.   They should look at the excellent range of  Mitsubishi inverters that use high / low modules and two large capacitors with copper bus bar connections. The windy boy has just about every disaster waiting to happen incorporated in the design. That said there software interpretation of the requirements of G83 and there data logging software is much better than the Soladin 600.

Regards

Alan
Logged
Paulh_Boats
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2795



« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2008, 10:06:59 PM »

Alan,

Ours will be in a cupboard under the stairs. The cupboard door opens in the dining room and the dining room door opens to the hallway in the centre of the house. So if necessary we can shut 2 doors to keep the noise down. I put a radio on in the cupboard and with either door shut you cannot hear it in the rest of the house.

Why does it go off grid and can it be tweaked? I'm slightly stuck up a creek with no paddle as the Soladin 600 is the only inverter that suits my panels (without additional panels).  Undecided


The PCB layout of the WindyBoy seems a bit poor and lack of noise filtering on the gate inputs suggests it was an early design?? For data logging the 600 Wizard I downloaded has enough info for me. If I wanted more I would write my own program.

cheers
Paul
Logged
Bill H
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 339



« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2008, 07:44:18 AM »

Hello Paul and co.

I have a Soladin 600 in an outside shed (not as advanced as Frot's Charnobyl but getting there !)

As Ian said, the fan kicks in typically above 300 watts and gradually becomes more noticeable as the power level (and hence temperature) rises.   The unit needs to be on a non-resonating surface otherwise there can be some additional vibration.  Peak noise is similar or a bit greater than a PC cooling fan.

Only advice would be to make sure there is plenty airflow to the unit to keep the temp down - above 40 deg it begins to throttle back, and that can be reached on a warm sunny day in the shed.... so I mounted the unit in the shade close to the floor.   

I've not had any problems with the system dropping off the grid though.

I'm just about to commission a second Soladin - though reading through this maybe I should have gone with the Sunnyboy upfront.  There has to be some value in modularity and flexibility though.

Best

Bill
« Last Edit: February 10, 2008, 07:46:52 AM by Bill H » Logged

The only safe place for a fusion reactor is 93 million miles away.
Paulh_Boats
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2795



« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2008, 10:51:58 AM »

Bill,

Thanks for the info. I also think flexibility and modularity are important for us pioneering types!

Try attaching a large PC fan to the Soladin case - they shift a lot of air and are quiet also. You could switch it automatically with a heating thermostat set to 30C. Keeping the temperatures down improves electronic equipment reliability also.

Depending how adventurous and skilled you are with electronics a CPU cooler might do a great job. They regularly remove 50 Watts which is what the Soladin will dissipate on full power.

cheers
Paul
Logged
Alan
Guest
« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2008, 12:30:19 PM »

Hello Paul

The grid electrical supply here is not good in a remote village location, the Windy Boy inverter coped much better with the electrical disturbances caused on the grid system. If your grid supply is more stable the Soladin 600 will perform very well. The fan noise is not excessive but if you were relaxing in the same room as the inverter a guest would probably comment on ď whatís that noise ď . As said its better off in a cupboard with plenty of ventilation. As Ian said the design has been catered for the domestic environment, if the box was slightly larger with better heat sinks fitted there would be no requirement for a cooling fan to be used.
With the Sunny / Windy Boy inverters and the use of the installer software useful modifications can be made to maximise the usefulness of the system. I am not aware of any software thatís available to enable any flexibility to be obtained with the Soladin 600 inverter. As for data logging software version 1.4.9. is the one that forgets the date at times.

Regards

Alan
Logged
Paulh_Boats
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2795



« Reply #14 on: February 10, 2008, 04:18:50 PM »

Alan,

I have version 1.4.2.1 built 17/06/07 of the Wizard and I have never noticed the date being wrong. PM your email address to me and I could send the soladin.exe file to you (1.4Mb compressed as a .rar file). Having said that 1.4.9 gets the date ok...... so maybe you have a windoze problem?

Occasionally on older PCs the battery for the real time clock fades away when not used for a while. That might give Windows the wrong date before it has time to syncronise to an atomic clock on the web, which is usually done once every week.

-cheers
Paul
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!