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Author Topic: Stunning photographs of the moon  (Read 4022 times)
bxman
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« on: March 03, 2016, 11:04:24 AM »

If you look at the first 10 seconds of this  clip

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-35702576

I can see several massive craters with debris trails radiating from them 

However I have been unable to find  still images showing the same areas .

Am I the only one that can see this?   or have I got it all wrong ?

Full screen pause @ 8 seconds any later and the image is overlaid by next scene.
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Nickel2
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« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2016, 11:25:55 AM »

Could have been taken at a different time of the lunar day. If you were taking spot-on pics of the moon, you'd do it at optimal lighting conditions. Perhaps the debris-trails from the craters are light at a different time of lunar day.
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EpEver 4210A at 24v
24V 400 Ah battery. (4x200Ah FLA)
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bxman
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« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2016, 11:35:51 AM »

There are several of them any they radiate through a full 360 deg .
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Andyr
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« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2016, 11:39:07 AM »

Hi,
    much also depends on how the picture was processed, they often enhance features with editing software to show up these details..... This is an example I did to show the slight differences in colour coming from different chemical elements on the moon....


* 21-34-42-125 (1024x820).jpg (476.62 KB, 1024x820 - viewed 1813 times.)
« Last Edit: March 03, 2016, 12:13:58 PM by Andyr » Logged

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desperate
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« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2016, 06:07:38 PM »

Those ejecta rays are one of the few features that show best at full moon at Lunar mid-day when the sun is directly overhead if you were standing on the moon that is. The most prominent to the eye is from the rater Tycho, and sligly less prominent is Copernicus, check them out at the next full moon.

Thats a beautifull piccy Andyr, what gear are you using to capture that??

Desp
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Andyr
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« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2016, 06:50:14 PM »

Hi Desp,
            used a 8inch tracking Newtonian and high speed camera (img132).....catching about 60 frames per second, then select the best 200 and combine them to get the sharp detail. Then use the magic of photoshop to bring out the colour details, I'm still a novice, but the moon is an easy one compared to the much fainter galaxies which you need a DSLR or  yet another dedicated camera for. You just need lots of time and a rare clear sky and tolerant wife   Grin

Andy.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2016, 07:36:08 PM by Andyr » Logged

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desperate
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« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2016, 07:20:08 PM »

I know what you mean abount a tolerant wife, mine wont let me into bed anymore after I've been out in the garden until some ungodly hour, can't say I blame her really, a shivering mumbling block of ice can't be pleasant to wake up next to. It is incredibly frustrating waiting for a clear night which you can stay up late for with no moon for capturing deep sky stuff, still as they say, as a hobby astrophotography is looking up. Do you have a reasonably dark sky? mines awfull and unless it is pretty clear the haze tends to drown out anything dimmer than 4th mag or so.

Desp
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Andyr
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« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2016, 07:53:47 PM »

Hi,
   sadly only a few miles from Chesterfield so average skys here.... Sad   We only moved here last year so haven't had the kit out this year as I have a fantastic 1950's solid cast iron pier which I need to concrete into the back garden with my heq5 mount.... another of the to many new projects in the our house, just feel like a waste when I keep seeing Jupiter waiting to be imaged while all my kit sits in boxes.  It will get its first light here later this year I hope...

Andy









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